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How to Identify and Track Your Real Estate Competitors
We all face competition in life. As a real estate agent, you're no stranger to the tough process of the competition. Regardless of the difficulties that competition might bring us, it's important to realize that competition is a healthy way to drive the progress of the real estate industry in general and your real estate brand specifically. But what makes you stand out and succeed in regard to your competitors is realizing your strengths and weaknesses as well as those of your competitors. This is why it's important to conduct a comprehensive competitive analysis and research your potential real estate competitors. Let's talk about the principles of competition. There are two types of competition: direct and indirect. So who are direct and indirect competitors of real estate agents? Direct - Direct competition consists of businesses that offer the same service as your brand. So in the case of real estate agents, they are in direct competition with other real estate agents. Indirect - Indirect competitors, unlike the direct ones, don't offer the same service, but they still meet the same needs with an alternative way. For example, real estate agents' indirect competitors can be services like for-sale-by-owner. Knowing your indirect competitors is as important as knowing the direct ones. It helps you to further the knowledge on why people choose or opt out of choosing your services. How Can You Identify Your Real Estate Competitors? After identifying your main competitors an important task falls on you to track them. Here's the criteria you should pay attention to: Real Estate Keywords Check what keywords they are targeting for organic and paid search. Knowing what keywords your competitors are targeting, in addition to knowing the general trends, will help you to identify what your competitors are lacking in terms of keywords. Tools like SpyFu can help you understand what your competitors' main keywords are. It's really hard to surprise and engage visitors because of the huge abundance of digital content. That's why content that is shared means your competitors found some niche that wasn't explored yet. Research it, and take your time to analyze why this content is shared. Try to understand it, but don't copy. Google Alerts Google is one of the most popular search engine platforms out there. People strive to make their content rank on at least the first page of Google, if not appear in first place. This is the ultimate goal of every successful business. This can be achieved with a certain amount of luck, but most importantly by being constantly aware of the current trends in your industry and being mindful of competition. Google Alerts helps you to achieve both. It can help you to know what other publications are writing about your competitors, what content pops up for certain important keywords, or even what others write about you. Knowing your backlinks is one way to understand where your SEO efforts are lacking. When you know your own backlinks and understand your competitors' backlinks, you can determine where you need to strengthen your marketing efforts. Tools like Ubersuggest and SEO Explorer can help you with that. Manual Checking In addition to checking your competitors with certain tools, you should also do manual research. The simplest thing to do is check Google with the keywords you want to rank with. Check who's taking first place. That might be an indicator of whether they're your direct or indirect competitors. Pay attention to local searches. You want to rank locally, so use keywords like "real estate agents near me," to help determine who your real estate competitor is, and optimize your own Google My Business profile. How to Track Your Real Estate Competitors and What to Pay Attention to Social Media Social media is one of the most important channels to connect with your potential and existing clients. Knowing the general trends in the real estate market and how your competitors are using social media will make your social media plan more comprehensive. Real Estate Blogs Even though visual content is what people are gravitating towards these days, blogging is still as popular as ever. Blogging brings necessary traffic to your website, while providing useful information to your visitors. Knowing what your competitors are writing about can spark creativity and give you new, fresh ideas to write about. But remember, even though copying is sometimes considered a form of flattery, this is not the case when it comes to digital content. Blogs can inspire you to create content of your own, but don't copy them word for word. Real Estate Newsletters Email marketing is a time tested method to engage and connect with your audience. It's an efficient way to deliver important messages and updates. If your competitors have a newsletter subscription form, subscribe to see what kind of emails they're sending. This will also give you an idea of a new newsletter campaign. Client Reviews Understanding how your competitors communicate with their clients will help you to identify your strengths and weaknesses and improve your own customer service. Knowing what your competitors' clients lack means you can fill that niche and offer a better service. Tools That Help You to Track and Identify Your Competitors Ubersuggest - Website traffic, SEO explorer, keyword analyzer and much more Alexa - Has a free option for site info and showcases the website rank and compares websites that are determined to be competitors Ahrefs - Has a free option to check domain ratings and showcases website authority (the higher DR you have, the better) SpyFu - Comprehensive keyword analyzer Google Alerts - To know what others say about your competitors, set up a Google Alert for specific keywords Social Mention - Helps you to identify what people on social media say about your brand or your competitors Google Keyword Planner - Also can be used to identify keywords of your competitors, and since the data comes straight from Google, it means the data is more accurate Semrush - Another great tool for checking keywords To view the original article, visit the Realtyna blog.
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When Will U.S. Buyers See Relief From Skyrocketing Home Prices?
Home prices usually follow the laws of supply and demand: when demand is strong, supply diminishes, and prices rise, creating an incentive for owners to sell and builders to build. As the supply of homes for sale increases, those high prices moderate or decline. But, on a year-over-year basis, U.S. home prices have increased for an astounding 110 months straight; and since the pandemic began, they've risen at an extraordinary pace. Just this past April, the median home sales price in the U.S. was $341,600, nearly 20% higher than the year before. So when can buyers expect to see some much-needed home price relief? Too Much Demand, Not Enough Supply The issue with the law of supply and demand lately has been…well…not enough supply and too much demand, especially surrounding new home builds. Builders can't keep up with new home demand due to shortages of materials and appliances, along with skilled labor. Lumber prices alone are more than 250% higher than last year, and are adding nearly $36,000 to the average cost of a new build. The extreme supply shortages have driven up the median price of new homes to $372,400, the most substantial annual gain since 1988, when prices rose 87% in one year. New home builds aside, we're also seeing two of the largest generations in history — millennials, and Generation Zers, reach homebuying age and ability. More than 80% of millennials plan to buy a home at some point in their lives, and last year, 39% of all homebuyers were younger than 40. Mortgage rates below 3% ignited the generational pressure to purchase, and home sales surged to the highest level since 2006, despite pandemic challenges. Record sales quickly drained available inventories, and by the end of 2020, supplies of homes for sale were the lowest since 1999, when the National Association of Realtors first kept inventory records Now, inventory is so low and prices so high that sales are finally starting to slow, falling for the third straight month in April. (READ MORE: How Are Sellers in the Current Market REALLY Doing?) Can the Drought Get Any Worse? Even though record numbers of millennials are entering the market, it's not a journey some want to take with seemingly no home price relief in sight. Buying a first home is so expensive today that nearly one out of five prospective millennial buyers say they are giving up on homeownership and plan to rent for the rest of their lives. Will their sitting out the market help ease inventories? Not likely, at least not right now. There's no sign that the laws of supply and demand can restore balance to the real estate economy any time soon, and it may be just a matter of time until the inventory drought shuts sales down to a trickle. Still, there are some positive signs that demand will decrease and supplies will increase enough to bring some home price relief: Mortgage Rates Should Increase, Tempering Demand-driven Price Hikes Home price relief won't happen until mortgage interest rates rise and home supplies improve. For two years, forecasters and mortgage companies have said that higher rates are just around the corner. This year, they may be right. Inflation is suddenly surging for the first time in decades, and Fannie Mae's economists predict housing could contribute more than two percentage points to inflation by the end of 2022. The forecasted rates on a 30-year fixed mortgage will reach 3% by mid-year and stay above 3% through 2022. The Mortgage Bankers Association sees rates reaching 3.5% by the end of 2021, and 4% in the second quarter next year. New Home Starts Are Up The inventory of previously owned homes reached record lows in April, but on a year-over-year basis, housing starts (new homes being built) in March surged to a nearly a 15-year high, and April starts were 67.3% higher than they were in April 2020. Fannie Mae forecasts an aggressive 16.3% increase in single-family home construction this year over 2020, but that increase in new homes amounts to about 2.4% of demand — far below what is needed to meet it. As Price Appreciation Slows, Sellers Will Become More Motivated Just as the fear of higher mortgage rates motivated buyers in 2020, the fear of falling prices driven by rising rates will motivate sellers. As a result, listings may begin to increase on a year-over-year basis in the first quarter of 2022, when sellers prepare for the spring sales season. Baby Boomers, who own 41% of the nation's homes, have been much slower than earlier generations to downsize as they age. Millions of Boomer homeowners lost more than a decade of appreciated equity after the housing crash in 2007, and many are waiting until prices peak to sell and regain as much equity as possible. In last year's price boom, older Baby Boomers sold their homes at a higher rate than any other age group. When it's clear that the current boom has run its course, more Boomers will be listing their homes for sale. The Experts Forecast Significant Changes in Prices by 2022 Economists at Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and several of the best real estate data and analytics firms forecast changes in market trends two years in advance. As of May, Fannie Mae forecasted that the median national price will rise 9.5% for new homes this year but only 4.4% in 2022. Home prices will continue to grow at 12.2% this year and 3.9% next year for existing homes. As of April, Freddie Mac forecasted that the price boom would end this year. Freddie's experts forecasted that all home prices, new and existing, will increase only 6.6% this year―a decline from 11.3% in 2020―and 4.4% in 2022. The respected real estate analytics firm CoreLogic agrees that home price increases will slow down this year, reporting that median year-over-year national price increase will fall to 2.8% by April 2022. Lawrence Yun, chief economist at the National Association of Realtors, also agrees. "We'll see more inventory come to the market later this year as further COVID-19 vaccinations are administered and potential home sellers become more comfortable listing and showing their homes," said Yun. "In addition, the falling number of homeowners in mortgage forbearance will also bring about more inventory." "Despite the decline, housing demand is still strong compared to one year ago, evidenced by home sales from this January to April, which are up 20% compared to 2020. Moreover, the additional supply projected for the market should cool down the torrid pace of price appreciation later in the year," Yun said. The Bottom Line Mortgage interest rates are the critical factor driving housing demand. It's more than likely that by the end of this year, rates could drive upwards of 4% or higher. Sellers, led by Boomers eager not to miss the price peak, will bring a modicum of relief to the inventory shortage. In 12 months, the rate of price appreciation for single-family homes will be half its current rate of 19.1%, if not lower. By then, inventories will improve but won't return to healthy levels until pent-up demand is met and new home construction makes a more significant contribution. So while we can't expect to see home prices fall, we can expect their increases to slow down significantly. Steve Cook is the editor of the Down Payment Report and provides public relations consulting services to leading companies and non-profits in residential real estate and housing finance. He has been vice president of public affairs for the National Association of Realtors, senior vice president of Edelman Worldwide and press secretary to two members of Congress. To view the original article, visit the Homes.com blog.
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Why Builders Can't Keep Up with Home Sales
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How Are Sellers in the Current Market REALLY Doing?
We've all heard about the on-fire housing market and how it's positioned sellers to ask for much while conceding little. But just how much are sellers in the current market really reaping hefty benefits? How are they feeling about the selling process? What desired outcomes are guiding their selling decisions? Homes.com surveyed 1,600 respondents from across the country to find out. Survey Findings Snapshot The current market is paying hefty dividends for sellers, prompting many homeowners to put their homes up for sale sooner than planned to take advantage of market conditions. Our survey found that 82% of homeowners who sold in the last six months accepted offers at listing price (33%) or above (49%), nearly half of them sold in less than a month, and a quarter of them had five or fewer showings before finding a buyer — reflecting both the low supply of available homes and the rush to buy when new listings hit the market. Shortage? What Inventory Shortage? One of the major hesitancies homeowners have in today's market is a concern about low inventory — and for good reason! Who wants to sell their home without the guarantee of finding another home to buy? But, as our survey found out, this wasn't as big a problem as might be expected. Significantly, of the sellers we surveyed who intended to sell and immediately buy a new home to move into, 86% were able to do just that, despite limited inventory. The rest cited a move into rentership while continuing to house shop. Of the sellers who didn't have any plans to buy after selling, 24% said they moved into their secondary home, 19% had already purchased a new home build and rented while waiting for construction to complete, 11% began renting simply because they wanted to, and 9% decided to move in with family or friends. Smooth Sailing Sellers haven't just enjoyed the success of buying new property; they've also reaped the benefits of smooth selling processes. Looking at finances, our survey found that 49% sold above listing price, while 33% of sellers sold at their original listing price. In fact, 27% wound up accepting offers $10,000, even $20,000+ higher than their requested sale price. Cha-ching! Glancing at the process between listing and offer acceptance, 27% of sellers said they had five or fewer in-person showings before selling, while 26% had between six and ten. Amazingly, nearly 10% had no in-person showings at all. But, this is perhaps not as surprising as it might be in previous years; thanks to the growing prevalence of virtual tours, there's been an upward trend in buyers' openness to purchase a home sight unseen. We also found a strong correlation between the number of showings sellers' homes had, and the number of offers they received. A third of sellers said they sold their homes within the first five offers received, and nearly two-thirds wound up selling within the first 10. This roughly correlates to the number of showings, indicating that sellers received bids after virtually every walkthrough. It also offers a glance into why homes are flying so quickly off the market so soon after being listed! If you've been helping clients on the hunt for a new home, you've likely encountered this scenario: your buyers find a home they love, you schedule a tour for as soon as you can, but by the time you get there, the home has already been sold. You're in good company; this blink-and-you-miss-it issue has been plaguing buyers across the country for months, and doesn't show signs of slowing down! When we asked sellers how long their homes were listed before they sold, 22% said the process took less than two weeks, 25% were on the market between two and four weeks, and 27% for between one and two months. In other words, only less than a third of sellers' listings were on the market for longer than two months. Calling the Shots Another story dominating headlines in the real estate sphere lately has been just how much power sellers have over the purchase process. A mix of sharp demand and low inventory have left sellers holding all the cards, and our survey found they're using them to their full advantage! Many of the sellers surveyed indicated they refused consideration of contingencies and other strings-attached offers; 28% of them required all-cash payments, no contingencies and/or less than 30 days to close, while 14% opted for selling their homes completely "as is," leaving buyers without the flexibility available in less competitive markets. Interestingly, we found that they were more amenable to making repairs requested after showings or home inspections, with 56% agreeing to perform repairs, upgrades or replacement requested by buyers as a condition of sale. Of those who made those adjustments, 34% spent $10,000 or more, but one in four were able to recoup those costs by selling for $10,000 or more over listing price. Why Did They Sell in the First Place? As if the initial adjustments to pandemic life weren't stressful enough, our survey found that COVID-19 challenges were major drivers for homeowners deciding to sell; 43% cited financial impacts from the pandemic as their primary reason for selling. Other reasons included job relocation (14%), upsizing or downsizing needs (14%), a desire to move to another neighborhood (8%), retirement (4%) or a transition to remote working providing the option to relocate (4%). For many sellers, the market itself was influential in their process, with one in three entering the market only because they saw the opportunity to sell quickly and profitably. Twenty-three percent said their local market opportunities sped up their planned timeline to sell, while a surprising 11% actually hadn't planned to sell at all, but changed their minds in hopes of cashing in on the booming demand. And yes, this did happen; 5% actually received unsolicited offers on their homes, and they wound up selling them! What Can We Expect Moving Forward? It's not likely we'll see immediate relief from this blistering market any time soon; however, Homes.com will continue this survey series with a focus on homeowners who are planning to sell in the coming months. What types of homes will they be listing? At what price will their homes be listed? Will they be more willing to negotiate terms? Stay tuned to find out! To view the original article, visit the Homes.com blog.
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Spring 2021 Housing Market: Will the Extremes Calm Down?
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Will the Great Urban Flight Last?
As COVID-19 has ravaged across the country, millions of people have faced lockdowns and home quarantines. Homes have become classrooms, offices, recreational spaces, and countless other identities. Especially in urban areas, walls have increasingly felt like cages, leaving residents craving open spaces, more square footage, and greenery. What has since transpired is nothing short of a phenomenon we're calling "The Great Urban Flight."
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The Collateral Damage of the Pandemic on Real Estate
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How 2020 Changed Homebuying and Selling
In the first week of March 2020, hundreds of thousands of home sellers put final touches on their properties before their agents listed them for sale. At the same time, a new and deadly coronavirus strain was sweeping the globe. Within a matter of weeks, home sales would plummet to their lowest levels since the housing crisis of 2007, and by year's end, 2020 changed homebuying and selling in drastic ways.
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2021 Housing Inventories: Will They Run Out?
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5 Predictions for the 2021 Housing Market
Following one of the strongest years for residential real estate on record, the 2021 housing market has some large proverbial shoes to fill. Both home sellers and buyers fared well in 2020; median home sale prices reached a record $304,100, surpassing $300,000 for the first time in history, while mortgage rates hit record lows. Optimistic housing economists expect a recovering national economy to improve the housing market even more in 2021. They see it motivating sellers who sat on the sidelines in 2020 and restoring confidence to buyers who did the same. Some housing forecasters have even predicted that 2021 will be a better year for residential real estate than 2020. Not everyone agrees with the rosy outlook, however.
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4 Factors Influencing the Real Estate Rebound
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3 Key Stats that Show Just How Busy 'Busy Season' Was
There's no doubt this has been the busiest busy season in some time. Spring shutdowns delayed the peak home-buying period by two months, and a pandemic-induced exodus from cities has resulted in a record-setting number of transactions in the suburbs. But just how busy is busy? Our data scientists crunched the numbers, and the results are even more mind-blowing than you might have thought.
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27 Real Estate Statistics You Should Know and Understand
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5 Shocking Yet True Real Estate Statistics
An article published by The Close highlights 57 real estate statistics that help real estate agents and those in the industry understand their market better. Understanding and leveraging these statistics to your benefit is the goal of this blog post. We have highlighted five of the statistics in the article that we feel is the most crucial to your real estate career. To learn more, please continue reading:
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Understanding the 2020 Real Estate Market
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Real Estate Agents' 2020 Market Predictions
Will 2020 favor buyers or sellers? What will be the biggest barrier to homeownership this year? What can agents do to prepare first time buyers? We asked over 400 real estate agents across the country what they think will happen this year. Do their predictions match what's happening in your local area?
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Friday Freebie: 2020 Real Estate Market Outlook
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How to Create a Market Activity Report for Any Neighborhood
When your clients or prospects are interested in tracking a neighborhood's activity, the RPR Market Activity report is the perfect fit. First, it's flexible and can be generated for any geography, even areas drawn by hand using the RPR map. In addition, the report itself includes changes in a local real estate market based on listing information and MLS data.
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What Does a Possible Economic Recession Mean for the Housing Market?
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Don't Make These Mistakes with Your Market Reports
Even folks who aren't thinking of buying or selling a home in the near future enjoy reading well-written real estate market reports. If you aren't using market reports in your marketing efforts, you're missing out on a prime opportunity to show your area expertise. However, it's not enough to slap up an MLS graph and call it a market report.
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5 Simple Steps to Share Your RPR Market Activity Report on Facebook
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RPR Reports: A Member's New Best Friend
Whether you're new to NAR or simply new to Realtors Property Resource, we're here to help get you started and get you using the most powerful business data tool in real estate. One of the many advantages to being a REALTOR is members-only access to RPR. What Is RPR? Realtors Property Resource is the nation's largest property database. As a new agent, this user-friendly, data-driven platform and business tool should never leave your side. Regular use of RPR will help you help your clients, which can lead to more listings, and hopefully, more deals! RPR makes it easy for REALTORS® to stand out from their competition. Using RPR as a real estate business tool will make you a more informed, more savvy, and more efficient REALTOR®. Ready to better serve your clients, market yourself like a pro, and grow your brand and business? Let's dive in... On-the-Go and in the Field, RPR Reports Give REALTORS® an Edge RPR reports put property details, market trends and neighborhood insight into one, convenient package that you can access anywhere, anytime. Picture this scene: you're conducting your first property walkthrough with your first clients. After viewing the home, your clients ask a basic question or two about square footage and number of BD/BA. But after the softballs, in come the curveballs! They might ask about taxes, warranties, school ratings, flood zones, property history, community resources, etc. As a REALTOR® with the RPR app in your palm, you can literally tap into RPR and instantly pull up real time, dynamic property data. You can even customize a property report with client comments, notes and photos, and text it to them right there on the kitchen island. Armed with these comprehensive reports, you can quickly and confidently answer any and all questions. Which will put your clients at ease, and position you as a knowledgeable, local real estate expert. RPR Report Topics RPR reports are a breeze to create and the customizable features will surely impress your clients. Here's a list of the different types of reports you can create: Buyer Tours: Select properties to tour, determine the order you'd like to see them, and create a colorful, client-friendly report to share with buyers. Market Activity: The report includes samples of active, pending, sold, expired and distressed properties, as well as recent price changes and upcoming open houses for a period of up to three months. Neighborhood: Paint a lifestyle picture with details on employment opportunities, traffic, weather, parks, dining, etc. The Neighborhood Report summarizes economic, housing, demographic and quality of life information about an area. Schools: Summarizes student populations, testing outcomes, parental reviews, ratings, and contact information about a public or private school. Compare schools within a district or a specified radius, and/or select up to 20 nearby listings to include in the report. Property Valuations: Gives details about the overall characteristics of a property such as values, foreclosure activity, market statistics, demographics, history, taxes and school information. Mini Property: The Mini Property Report is all about the essentials and includes info on the estimated value; home facts like bedrooms, baths and square footage; and photos. It's a great way to share property data with buyers at the onset. Property Flyer: A quick and easy way of marketing any property. Upload your own photos, enter a headline, and/or details about an upcoming open house. Seller's Report: Reviews the subject property, shows the condition of the local market, presents comparable properties for side-by-side comparisons, recommends a pricing strategy, and shows estimated seller proceeds. New REALTORS® Should Also Become New RPR Users! An easy-to-use, real estate tech tool that will make your job easier and make a serious, favorable impression on potential clients?! Yep, it's true. And it's literally made just for you. Visit the RPR site today and be sure to install the RPR app to your tablet or smartphone. Access to this powerful, real estate data tool is exclusive to REALTORS® and best of all, it's completely free as a part of your NAR membership. And also make sure to join the RPR Facebook Connect group. To view the original article, visit the RPR blog.
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3 RPR Report Customizations You Should Be Doing Now
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[Infographic] Best Seasons to Sell a Home
Ask most anyone which season is the best to sell a home, and likely, with little hesitation they will respond, "Summer." This stands to reason. Schools are out, giving families a clean break to transfer children to a new area. The weather is much nicer for attracting people to open houses. Many have a starry-eyed, relaxed attitude, freeing brain space to dream and plan for change. It can be, with well-laid plans, the perfect time to sell. But is it the BEST time to sell?
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Understanding the Real Estate Market to Generate More Sales in 2019
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Are You Keeping Home Sold Price Records?
When you want to look up some home sold prices for comps or other purposes, it's fast and easy to go to the MLS and get them. Do you know how long your MLS database keeps home sold prices where you can access them? Many remove them after five years, but check your MLS rules or ask, as it's important information. Whether you've checked or not, virtually everyone at some time or another wants information about home sold prices, and serious buyers and investors want long-term price appreciation information as well. The key here is "long-term." If your MLS is purging sold records after five years, that's all the reliable historical data available. There must be some value in having older sold price information, and you can build your own database easily.
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Research Properties with the RPR Map
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Share This: Market-Driven Graphics Your Sphere Will Love
Want to spruce up your website, blog, or social media profiles with sophisticated, market-driven imagery? Today, we'll show you how to take advantage of a resource that's free to you as a dues-paying REALTOR. Take Advantage of High-End Market Visualizations We all know NAR-affiliated realtor.com as a popular property search portal--but did you know that the site also has a Research section that's chock-full of interactive maps and charts that you can share with your clients and prospects? It's true--and REALTORS are free to embed, download, and re-post these visualizations across their marketing channels! Here's a sampling of the interactive reports realtor.com currently offers, and suggestions for how to use them in your marketing efforts:
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Find the Local Market that Offers the Best Growth Opportunity
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Top Job Markets for Real Estate Professionals vs. Top U.S. Real Estate Markets
As with the start of any year, professionals within the industry are anxious to know the markets where they have the most opportunities for business. As WalletHub points out, "location, location, location might be the most hackneyed expression in the real-estate profession," and applies to both the real estate professional and their clients. Recently, WalletHub analysts "compared 150 of the largest U.S. cities across 14 key indicators of a healthy real estate environment." The findings of the study were intended to highlight the best places to be a real estate agent in 2017. Check out how their top 20 compare to what realtor.com predicated as the top housing markets for 2017. WalletHub's Top 20 Places to Be a Real-Estate Agent Honolulu, HI Seattle, WA Denver, CO Boston, MA Aurora, CO Madison, WI Reno, NV San Francisco, CA Irvine, CA Austin, TX Colorado Springs, CO Portland, OR Henderson, NV Lincoln, NE Santa Rosa, CA Spokane, WA Nashville, TN Vancouver, WA Washington, DC New York, NY "In order to determine the best cities for real-estate agents, WalletHub's analysts compared 150 of the most populated U.S. cities across two key dimensions, including 'Job Opportunity & Competition' and 'Real-Estate Market Health.'" Each city was graded individually and on a 100-point scale.
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Grow as You Go: Searching Your Subject Property on RPR®
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Friday Freebie: Guide to Mobile Engagement
The explosion of mobile devices has changed how consumers search for real estate. More importantly, it's transformed how your website generates leads. Think that prospect who couldn't access your site on their iPhone will visit again from their laptop? Think again. The truth is, if your site isn't optimized for mobile, you're missing out on a huge number of leads. Mobile is an intimidating world, and it can be hard to know where to begin. In this week's Friday Freebie, we highlight a guide that can show you exactly where to start. Download a free whitepaper from Delta Media Group Delta Media Group started seeing dramatic changes in consumers' online search behavior starting in 2010. "Those changes in behavior are maturing now," said Delta CEO Mike Minard in a recent interview. "The method in which REALTORS® need to engage these customers is different." To get agents and brokers up to speed on these changes, Delta has released an informative white paper that's easy to read, regardless of your level of tech savvy. "The Mobile Customer Experience: Trending, Optimization, and Application" explores recent trends in online engagement, backed by traffic statistics from over 35,000 websites. In this free paper, agents and brokers will learn more about: Mobile engagement trends Measuring client expectations Mobile web vs. apps Click here to download the white paper now!
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Product Review: RBIntel
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Is there a market for haunted homes?
With a two-year-old and an eight-week-old at home, it's not often that I get a chance to kick back and watch a little television. However, last Friday I was fortunate enough to get a couple of hours to zone out in front of the tube. I caught a show on the Travel Channel called "Ghost Adventures," where a group of three "ghost hunters" lock themselves into a haunted location overnight and use various gizmos and gadgets to capture haunted activity. This particular episode featured a young couple who had recently purchased Black Moon Manor in Greenfield, IN. Since their purchase, the couple has experienced "unexplained" activity and asked the "Ghost Adventures" crew to investigate (cue the "Ghost Busters" theme music). As the crew interviews the owners and videos the inside of the house you have to wonder, why on earth would anyone buy this property?
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How to Use the RVM in a Pricing Discussion
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Mobile stats stack well for Rand Realty
I recently had the chance to sit down with the great folks over at BHG Rand Realty, New York, to discuss their current mobile strategy, changes they want to make to the present and where they want to go and do in the near future.  Matt and Joe Rand proved to be industry leaders on the mobile real estate forefront over a year ago when they launched the robust mobile version of www.RandRealty.com which was unlike any mobile site of its kind at the time.  Their new initiatives will only serve to continue that statement, I can assure of that having had a sneak peak, but that’s not what we will focus on here in this column. Instead, what I think is even more worthwhile than discussing what they will be doing, is reviewing the success they have had with what they have already done.  A report that was presented in during this meeting showed that their mobile website was the 12th largest source of traffic, just slightly less than Realtor.com the 11th largest source.  If that doesn’t put in perspective how any consumers are accessing your website from their mobile devices on a daily basis than I don’t know will.
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HomeGain Releases 2nd Quarter 2011 National Home Values Survey Results
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How Branding Builds Trust and Familiarity for REALTORS®
Every type of business needs to pay close attention to branding, real estate included. Most potential clients don’t know anything about your business until you establish and build relationships with them. Their first impressions and perspectives of the company will come straight from whatever branding they’re exposed to. Even after clients know you, branding continues to affect how they view the company. It serves as a reminder that the company is successful and always ready to help them connect with the property of their dreams.  
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