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CoreLogic Loan Performance Insights Finds Declining Mortgage Delinquency Rates for April as States Impacted by 2017 Hurricanes Continue to Recover
CoreLogic, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its monthly Loan Performance Insights Report. The report shows that, nationally, 4.2 percent of mortgages were in some stage of delinquency (30 days or more past due, including those in foreclosure) in April 2018, representing a 0.6 percentage point decline in the overall delinquency rate compared with April 2017, when it was 4.8 percent. As of April 2018, the foreclosure inventory rate – which measures the share of mortgages in some stage of the foreclosure process – was 0.6 percent, down 0.1 percentage points from 0.7 percent in April 2017. Since August 2017, the foreclosure inventory rate has been steady at 0.6 percent, the lowest level since June 2007, when it was also 0.6 percent. The April 2018 foreclosure inventory rate was the lowest for that month in 11 years; it was also 0.6 percent in April 2007. Measuring early-stage delinquency rates is important for analyzing the health of the mortgage market. To monitor mortgage performance comprehensively, CoreLogic examines all stages of delinquency, as well as transition rates, which indicate the percentage of mortgages moving from one stage of delinquency to the next. The rate for early-stage delinquencies – defined as 30 to 59 days past due – was 1.8 percent in April 2018, down from 2.2 in April 2017. The share of mortgages that were 60 to 89 days past due in April 2018 was 0.6 percent, unchanged from April 2017. The serious delinquency rate – defined as 90 days or more past due, including loans in foreclosure – was 1.9 percent in April 2018, down from 2.0 percent in April 2017. The April 2018 serious delinquency rate was the lowest for that month since 2007 when it was 1.6 percent. "Job growth, home-price appreciation, and full-doc underwriting have pushed delinquency and foreclosure rates to the lowest point in more than a decade," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. "The latest CoreLogic Home Price Index report revealed the annual national home price growth was 7.1 percent in May, the fastest annual growth in four years. U.S. employers have also continued to employ more individuals, as employment rose by 2.4 million throughout the last 12 months with 213,000 jobs added last month alone. Together, this heightened financial stability is pushing delinquency and foreclosure rates to record lows." Since early-stage delinquencies can be volatile, CoreLogic also analyzes transition rates. The share of mortgages that transitioned from current to 30 days past due was 0.8 percent in April 2018, down from 1.2 percent in April 2017. By comparison, in January 2007, just before the start of the financial crisis, the current- to 30-day transition rate was 1.2 percent, while it peaked in November 2008 at 2 percent. As a result of the 2017 hurricane season, Florida and Texas are the only states showing significant gains in 90-day delinquency rates. According to the CoreLogic Storm Surge Report, Florida has the most densely populated and longest coastal area and thus the most exposure to storm surge flooding (compared to the 19 states analyzed in the report) with more than 2.7 million at-risk homes across five risk categories (Category 1 – Category 5 storms). Louisiana ranks second with more than 817,000 at-risk homes, while Texas ranks third with more than 543,000 at-risk homes. A major storm did not strike Louisiana in 2017, but Florida and Texas are still recovering from Hurricanes Irma and Harvey, respectively. "Delinquency rates are nearing historic lows, except in areas impacted by extreme weather over the past 18 months, reflecting a long period of strict underwriting practices and improved economic conditions," said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "Last year's hurricanes and wildfires continue to affect today's default rates. The percent of loans 90 days or more delinquent or in foreclosure are more than double what they were before last autumn's hurricanes in Houston, Texas and Naples, Florida. The 90-day-plus delinquent or in-foreclosure rate has also quadrupled in Puerto Rico." For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider. The company's combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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CoreLogic Reports Declining Foreclosure Rates in February, Signaling a Strong Economy
CoreLogic®, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its monthly Loan Performance Insights Report, which shows that, nationally, 4.8 percent of mortgages were in some stage of delinquency (30 days or more past due, including those in foreclosure) in February 2018. This represents a 0.2 percentage point decline in the overall delinquency rate, compared with February 2017 when it was 5 percent. As of February 2018, the foreclosure inventory rate – which measures the share of mortgages in some stage of the foreclosure process – was 0.6 percent, down 0.2 percentage points from 0.8 percent in February 2017. Since August 2017, the foreclosure inventory rate has been steady at 0.6 percent, the lowest level since June 2007, when it was also 0.6 percent. The February 2018 foreclosure inventory rate was the lowest for the month of February in 11 years; it was also 0.6 percent in February 2007. Measuring early-stage delinquency rates is important for analyzing the health of the mortgage market. To monitor mortgage performance comprehensively, CoreLogic examines all stages of delinquency, as well as transition rates, which indicate the percentage of mortgages moving from one stage of delinquency to the next. The rate for early-stage delinquencies – defined as 30-59 days past due – was 2.1 percent in February 2018, up from 2 percent in January 2018 and unchanged from February 2017. The share of mortgages that were 60-89 days past due in February 2018 was 0.7 percent, down from 0.8 percent in January 2018 and unchanged 0.7 percent in February 2017. The serious delinquency rate – defined as 90 days or more past due, including loans in foreclosure – was 2.1 percent in February 2018, unchanged from January 2018 and down from 2.2 percent in February 2017. The February 2018 serious delinquency rate was the lowest for the month of February since February 2007, when it was 1.6 percent. "Last year's hurricanes continue to have an effect on loan performance in affected markets, showing up in statewide data," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. "Serious delinquency rates in February were 50 percent higher than in August 2017 in Texas, and nearly double in Florida, even though the wind and flood damage was primarily in coastal markets. In Puerto Rico, the damage was widespread. Serious delinquency rates were up five-fold over the August-to-February period, with a significant increase in all metropolitan areas there." Since early-stage delinquencies can be volatile, CoreLogic also analyzes transition rates. The share of mortgages that transitioned from current to 30 days past due was 0.9 percent in February 2018, up from 0.8 percent in January 2018 and down from 1 percent in February 2017. By comparison, in January 2007, just before the start of the financial crisis, the current- to 30-day transition rate was 1.2 percent, while it peaked in November 2008 at 2 percent. "Overall delinquency rates fell in the U.S. over the past year, driven by a long run of stringent underwriting, higher employment and wages," said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "At the same time, our CoreLogic U.S. Home Price Index (HPI) showed a 6.4 percent increase in home-price appreciation for the 12 months, which ended in February 2018. These factors bode well for the fortunes of both homeowners and mortgage servicers." For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider. The company's combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity Decreases 19 Percent in Q1 2018 to Stay Below Pre-Recession Levels for Sixth Consecutive Quarter
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CoreLogic Reports Early-Stage Delinquencies Increased Slightly in December But Serious Delinquency and Foreclosure Inventory Rates Declined Year Over Year
CoreLogic, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its monthly Loan Performance Insights Report which shows that, nationally, 5.3 percent of mortgages were in some stage of delinquency (30 days or more past due, including those in foreclosure) in December 2017. This represents no change in the overall delinquency rate compared with December 2016 when it was also 5.3 percent. As of December 2017, the foreclosure inventory rate, which measures the share of mortgages in some stage of the foreclosure process, was 0.6 percent, down 0.2 percentage points from 0.8 percent in December 2016. Since August 2017, the foreclosure inventory rate has been steady at 0.6 percent, the lowest level since June 2007, when it was also 0.6 percent. This past December's foreclosure inventory rate was the lowest for the month of December in 11 years; it was also 0.6 percent in December 2006. Measuring early-stage delinquency rates is important for analyzing the health of the mortgage market. To monitor mortgage performance comprehensively, CoreLogic examines all stages of delinquency, as well as transition rates, which indicate the percentage of mortgages moving from one stage of delinquency to the next. The rate for early-stage delinquencies – defined as 30-59 days past due – was 2.3 percent in December 2017, up 0.1 percentage points from 2.2 percent in both November 2017 and December 2016. The share of mortgages that were 60-89 days past due in December 2017 was 0.8 percent, down from 0.9 percent in November 2017 and up from 0.7 percent in December 2016. The serious delinquency rate – defined as 90 days or more past due, including loans in foreclosure – was 2.1 percent in December 2017, up from 2 percent in November 2016 and down from 2.3 percent in December 2016. The December 2017 serious delinquency rate was the lowest for the month of December since December 2006, when it was 1.5 percent. "The wildfires in Sonoma and Napa counties began October 8 and destroyed or damaged thousands of homes. Two- and three-month delinquency rates have spiked in these two counties, more than doubling between October and December," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. "The after effects of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria continue to appear as well. Serious delinquency rates in the Houston and Miami metropolitan areas doubled between September and year-end and quadrupled in the San Juan area of Puerto Rico." Since early-stage delinquencies can be volatile, CoreLogic also analyzes transition rates. The share of mortgages that transitioned from current to 30 days past due was 1.1 percent in December 2017, up from 1 percent in both November 2017 and December 2016. This was the highest rate for a December, as it was 1.2 percent in December 2013. By comparison, in January 2007, just before the start of the financial crisis, the current- to 30-day transition rate was 1.2 percent, while it peaked in November 2008 at 2 percent. "The effect of the wildfires and hurricanes on delinquency transition rates was all too clear in our latest analysis," said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "In Sonoma and Napa counties, both 30-to-60 day and 60-to-90 day delinquent transition rates in December were more than double what they had averaged the prior year. Likewise, neighborhoods affected by hurricanes have seen a jump in transition rates in the months immediately following. These natural disasters have stalled or reversed the decline in 30-to-119 day delinquency rates that we had seen previously." For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider. The company's combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity Drops to 12-Year Low in 2017
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U.S. Distressed Sales Share Drops to 10-Year Low in Q3 2017
66 Percent of U.S. Markets Have Now Exceeded Pre-Recession Home Price Peaks; Homeownership Tenure Up to New High of 8.19 Years, New Record Profits for Sellers; Cash Sales Share Up Annually for Second Straight Quarter Following 15 Quarters Down IRVINE, Calif. – Nov. 2, 2017 — ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's largest multi-sourced property database, today released its Q3 2017 U.S. Home Sales Report, which shows that distressed home sales — including bank-owned (REO) sales, third-party foreclosure auction sales, and short sales — accounted for 12.5 percent of all home sales in Q3 2017, down from 13.5 percent in the previous quarter and down from 14.1 percent in Q3 2016 to the lowest level since Q3 2007. "Distressed sales nationally are now the exception rather than the rule, and we would expect the distressed sale share to return to the pre-recession norm of single-digit percentages within the next year given the current downward trajectory," said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president at ATTOM Data Solutions. "Distressed sales have become more localized in nature, with some of the biggest increases from a year ago in markets experiencing regional economic weakness or a natural disaster event that has triggered a jump in foreclosure activity." Distressed sales share increases in Corpus Christi, Indianapolis, Cedar Rapids, Baton Rouge Among 146 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000 and at least 100 distressed sales during the quarter, those with the highest share of distressed sales were Atlantic City, New Jersey (35.2 percent); McAllen-Edinburg, Texas (24.5 percent); Montgomery, Alabama (23.7 percent); Akron, Ohio (23.2 percent); and Youngstown, Ohio (22.5 percent). Metros with the smallest share of distressed sales in Q3 2017 were San Jose, California (3.1 percent); Salt Lake City, Utah (3.3 percent); Austin, Texas (4.1 percent); San Francisco, California (5.2 percent); and Provo-Orem, Utah (5.5 percent). Counter to the national trend, 29 of the 146 metros analyzed for distressed sales (20 percent) posted a year-over-year increase in the share of distressed sales, led by Corpus Christi, Texas (up 33 percent); Indianapolis, Indiana (up 30 percent); Cedar Rapids, Iowa (up 29 percent); Baton Rouge, Louisiana (up 25 percent); Provo, Utah (up 22 percent); and Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (up 22 percent). Major metros with an increase in the share of distressed sales compared to a year ago included New York, New York (up 6 percent); Dallas, Texas (up 13 percent); Houston, Texas (up 7 percent); Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (up 1 percent); and Phoenix, Arizona (up 6 percent). Median sales prices exceed pre-recession peaks in 66 percent of local markets The median sales price nationwide in the third quarter was $248,000, up 10 percent from a year ago to a new all-time high — 3 percent above the pre-recession high of $241,900 in Q3 2005. It was the second consecutive quarter where median home prices nationwide were above the pre-recession peak. Median home prices increased to new all-time highs in 55 of 126 metro areas analyzed for home price appreciation in the report (44 percent), including Los Angeles, Dallas, Atlanta, Detroit and Seattle. Median home prices have exceeded pre-recession peaks since the end of the recession in 83 of the 126 metro areas (66 percent). Median home prices are still below pre-recession peaks in 43 of 126 metropolitan areas analyzed for home price appreciation in the report (34 percent), including New York (6 percent below); Chicago (10 percent below); Philadelphia (2 percent below); and Washington, D.C. (3 percent below). Markets with median home prices in Q3 2017 still furthest below the pre-recession peak were York, Pennsylvania (60 percent below); Naples, Florida (24 percent below); Modesto, California (21 percent below); Bridgeport, Connecticut (20 percent below); Mobile, Alabama (19 percent below); and Las Vegas, Nevada (19 percent below). Ann Arbor, Ocala, Salt Lake City, San Jose, St. Louis post biggest home price increases Among the 126 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report, those with the biggest year-over-year increase in median home prices were Ann Arbor, Michigan (up 16 percent); Ocala, Florida (up 16 percent); Salt Lake City, Utah (up 14 percent); San Jose, California (up 14 percent); St. Louis, Missouri (up 14 percent); Other markets in the top 10 for biggest home price increases were Reno, Nevada (up 13 percent); Seattle, Washington (up 13 percent); Las Vegas, Nevada (up 13 percent); Greeley, Colorado (up 12 percent); and Salem, Oregon (up 12 percent). Biggest home seller profits in San Jose, San Francisco, Seattle, Austin, Portland Home sellers in Q3 2017 sold for $58,000 more than their original purchase price on average, a percent gain of 31 percent above original purchase price on average — the highest average dollar gain and percent gain since Q2 2007. Among 128 metropolitan statistical areas with at least 200,000 people and sufficient historical home sales and price data, those with the highest average percent gain for home sellers in Q3 2017 were San Jose, California (80 percent); San Francisco, California (71 percent); Seattle, Washington (65 percent); Austin, Texas (59 percent); Portland, Oregon (58 percent). Counter to the national trend, 32 of the 128 metropolitan statistical areas (25 percent) analyzed for home seller gains posted a quarter-over-quarter decrease in average percent gains, including San Francisco, California, Santa Rosa, California, Modesto, California, Denver, Colorado, and Boulder, Colorado. Average homeownership tenure increases to new record high in third quarter U.S. homeowners who sold in the third quarter had owned an average of 8.19 years, up from an average of 7.97 years for homes sold in the previous quarter and up from 7.77 years for homes sold in Q3 2016 to a new record high as far back as ATTOM has data available, to Q1 2000. Among 99 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000 and sufficient historical data, those with the longest average homeownership tenure for homes sold in Q3 2017 were Springfield, Massachusetts (12.48 years); Worcester, Massachusetts (12.41 years); New Haven, Connecticut (12.35 years); Boston, Massachusetts (12.25 years); and Bridgeport, Connecticut (12.24 years). "The marked increase in the length of time that Seattle homeowners are staying in their homes is notable — in 2000, the average home ownership tenure was 5.5 years and today it is more than a decade," said Matthew Gardner, chief economist at Windermere Real Estate, covering the Seattle market, where the average homeownership tenure of 10.16 years in the third quarter was the 18th longest in the country and a new record high for Seattle. "This would help explain, to a degree, why we are experiencing such a lack of inventory in the Seattle market. I wouldn't be surprised if we saw this number rise further as homeowners choose to stay in their homes and remodel rather than actively compete for a new home." Metro areas with the shortest average homeownership tenure were Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (6.52 years); Detroit, Michigan (7.08 years); Austin, Texas (7.11 years); Denver, Colorado (7.20 years); and Tulsa, Oklahoma (7.23 years). Counter to the national trend, the average homeownership tenure decreased from a year ago in 19 of the metro areas analyzed, including Portland, Oregon (down 1 percent); Cincinnati, Ohio (down 1 percent); Salt Lake City, Utah (down 1 percent); Honolulu, Hawaii (down 2 percent); and Dayton, Ohio (down 1 percent). Cash sales share increases in Grand Rapids, Tucson, Albany, Modesto, Chattanooga All-cash buyers accounted for 27.2 percent of single family home and condo sales in the third quarter, down from 28.2 percent in the previous quarter but up from 26.7 percent in Q3 2016 —the second consecutive quarter with a year-over-year increase following 15 consecutive quarters of year-over-year decreases. "Across Southern California, home price appreciation, and low listing inventory, are contributing factors demonstrating a pent-up demand for home buyers wishing to take advantage of the benefits associated with homeownership," said Michael Mahon, president at First Team Real Estate covering the Southern California market. With cash transactions accounting for nearly one out of five closed escrow transactions within our market, it is clear consumers continue to leverage all cash offers as a method of offer differentiation, in attempts of purchasing a home." Among 132 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000 and at least 1,000 single family home and condo sales in Q3 2017, those with the highest share of all-cash sales during the quarter were Mobile, Alabama (53.8 percent); Tucson, Arizona (50.4 percent); Scranton, Pennsylvania (49.1 percent); Grand Rapids, Michigan (48.5 percent); and Palm Bay-Melbourne-Titusville, Florida (46.6 percent). Seventy-six of the 132 metro areas analyzed for cash sales (58 percent) posted a year-over-year increase in share of cash sales, led by Grand Rapids, Michigan (up 110 percent); Tucson, Arizona (up 88 percent); Albany, New York (up 87 percent); Modesto, California (up 55 percent); and Chattanooga, Tennessee (up 49 percent). Institutional investor purchases up in Clarksville, Charlotte, Jacksonville, Nashville, Omaha The share of U.S. single family home and condo sales sold to institutional investors (entities buying at least 10 properties in a calendar year) represented 2.7 percent of all single family home and condo sales in the third quarter, up from 2.1 percent in the previous quarter but still down from 2.9 percent in Q3 2016 — the fourth consecutive quarter with a year-over-year decrease. Among 132 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000 and at least 1,000 single family home and condo sales in Q3 2017, those with the highest share of institutional investor purchases during the quarter were Memphis, Tennessee (9.3 percent); Birmingham, Alabama (8.3 percent); Clarksville, Tennessee (6.9 percent); Charlotte, North Carolina (6.6 percent); and Killeen, Texas (6.1 percent). Counter to the national trend, 39 of the 132 metro areas analyzed (30 percent) posted a year-over-year increase in share of institutional investor purchases, including Clarksville, Tennessee (up 48 percent); Charlotte, North Carolina (up 19 percent); Jacksonville, Florida (up 5 percent); Nashville, Tennessee (up 28 percent); and Omaha, Nebraska (up 6 percent). FHA buyer share drops to lowest level in 10 quarters Sales to FHA buyers (typically first-time homebuyers or other buyers with a low down payment) represented 13.5 percent of all single family home and condo sales in the third quarter, down from 14.2 percent in the previous quarter and down from 15.6 percent in Q3 2016 to the lowest level since Q1 2015. Among 132 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000 and at least 1,000 home in Q3 2017, those with the highest share of FHA sales were Ogden, Utah (30.9 percent); El Paso, Texas (29.8 percent); Indianapolis, Indiana (25.9 percent); Salt Lake City, Utah (23.3 percent); and York, Pennsylvania (23.2 percent). Metros with the lowest share of FHA sales in Q3 2017 were Honolulu, Hawaii (2.0 percent); Boulder, Colorado (2.7 percent); Madison, Wisconsin (2.8 percent); San Jose, California (3.2 percent); and Asheville, North Carolina (3.9 percent). About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions is the curator of the ATTOM Data Warehouse, a multi-sourced national property database that blends property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, health hazards, neighborhood characteristics and other property characteristic data for more than 150 million U.S. residential and commercial properties. The ATTOM Data Warehouse delivers actionable data to businesses, consumers, government agencies, universities, policymakers and the media in multiple ways, including bulk file licenses, APIs and customized reports.
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Vacant Property Rate Increases From a Year Ago in 54 Percent of U.S. Local Housing Markets in Q3 2017
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity Drops to More Than 11-Year Low in Q3 2017
Foreclosure Activity Below Pre-Recession Levels in 57 Percent of Metro Areas; Foreclosure Starts Up in 24 Percent of Markets Including Dallas, Denver, Cincinnati; 2014 FHA Loans Post Highest Foreclosure Rate for Any FHA Loan Vintage Since 2009 IRVINE, Calif. – Oct. 12, 2017 — ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's largest multi-sourced property database, today released its Q3 2017 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report™, which shows a total of 191,824 U.S. properties with foreclosure filings — default notices, scheduled auctions or bank repossessions — in the third quarter, down 13 percent from the previous quarter and down 35 percent from a year ago to the lowest level since Q2 2006 — a more than 11-year low. U.S. foreclosure activity in Q3 2017 was 31 percent below the pre-recession average of 278,912 properties with foreclosure filings per quarter between Q1 2006 and Q3 2007 — the fourth consecutive quarter where U.S. foreclosure activity has tracked below the pre-recession average. "Legacy foreclosures from the high-risk loans originated between 2004 and 2008 have largely been cleared out of the distressed market pipeline," said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president at ATTOM Data Solutions. "Meanwhile loans originated during the housing boom of the last five years are posting foreclosure rates below historic averages, with the notable exception of FHA loans originated in 2014, which have the highest foreclosure rate of any FHA loan vintage since 2009 — 29 percent above the historic average for FHA loans although still 55 percent below the peak in 2007. "Elevated foreclosure rates on 2014 vintage FHA loans reflect a gradual loosening of credit as the sustained housing boom is slowly bolstering confidence and increasing risk tolerance in the real estate market," Blomquist added. "This trend also explains increasing foreclosure starts in the third quarter in some of the nation's hottest housing markets, counter to the national trend. If we see this pattern continue for 2015- and 2016-originated loans as those vintages age, we would expect to see a more widespread — although still relatively modest — lift in foreclosure activity in the next few years." Foreclosure starts down nationwide, up in 24 percent of local markets Lenders started the foreclosure process on 93,724 U.S. properties in Q3 2017, down 7 percent from the previous quarter and down 16 percent from a year ago to the lowest level since ATTOM began tracking, in Q2 2005. Counter to the national trend 51 metro areas (24 percent of the 217 analyzed in the report) posted a year-over-year increase in foreclosure starts in Q3 2017, including Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas (6 percent increase); Denver, Colorado (12 percent increase); Cincinnati, Ohio (5 percent increase); Cleveland, Ohio (29 percent increase); and Columbus, Ohio (up 23 percent). Other major metros with a year-over-year increase in foreclosure starts in Q3 2017 included Austin, Texas (up 29 percent); Nashville, Tennessee (up 17 percent); Milwaukee, Wisconsin (up 97 percent); Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (up 34 percent); and Louisville, Kentucky (up 27 percent). FHA foreclosure rates on 2014 vintage loans were at an 11-year high in Austin and Denver, a 10-year high in Oklahoma City and Nashville, a nine-year high in Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus and Dallas, and a seven-year high in Louisville. Foreclosure activity below pre-recession levels in 57 percent of local markets Third quarter foreclosure activity was below pre-recession averages in 123 of the 217 metro areas analyzed in the report (57 percent), including Los Angeles (55 percent below), Chicago (20 percent below), Dallas (77 percent below), Houston (63 percent below), and Miami (51 percent below). "Foreclosure activity in the greater Seattle area continues to trend lower and is now at levels not seen since this this report was started," said Matthew Gardner, chief economist with Windermere Real Estate, covering the Seattle market, where third quarter foreclosure activity was 46 percent below its pre-recession average. "The market remains starved for inventory which is pushing up prices well above average rates. As such, almost all housing units that were in negative equity have seen values rebound, which is why foreclosure activity has dropped to such low levels. "As long as the regional economy continues to flourish, I do not expect to see foreclosures rise. That said, home price growth is starting to negatively impact affordability, and this is becoming troublesome," Gardner continued. "Any slowdown in the local economy could lead to an increase in foreclosure activity, but nothing close to the levels seen during the housing recession." Counter to the national trend, Q3 2017 foreclosure activity was above pre-recession averages in 94 of the 217 metros analyzed in the report (43 percent), including New York (57 percent above), Philadelphia (50 percent above), Washington, D.C. (44 percent above), Baltimore (256 percent above), and Virginia Beach (371 percent above). Highest foreclosure rates in Atlantic City, Trenton, Cleveland States with the highest Q3 2017 foreclosure rates were New Jersey (one in every 238 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Delaware (one in every 276); Maryland (one in every 363); Illinois (one in every 426); and Ohio (one in every 455). Among 217 metropolitan areas with at least 200,000 people analyzed in the report, those with the highest foreclosure rates in Q3 2017 were Atlantic City, New Jersey (one in every 150 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Trenton, New Jersey (one in 234); Cleveland, Ohio (one in 275); Fayetteville, North Carolina (one in 283); and Columbia, South Carolina (one in 284). Average foreclosure timeline increases to new record high Lenders completed the foreclosure process (REO) on 55,993 U.S. properties in Q3 2017, down 29 percent from the previous quarter and down 35 percent from a year ago to the lowest level since Q3 2006. Properties foreclosed in the third quarter had been in the foreclosure process an average of 899 days, up from 883 days the previous quarter to a new record high. States with the longest average time to foreclose in Q3 2017 were Indiana (1,779 days), New Jersey (1,281 days), New York (1,256 days), Florida (1,234 days), Illinois (1,087 days), and Connecticut (1,001 days). States with the shortest average time to foreclose in the third quarter were Virginia (171 days), Arkansas (296 days), Oregon (341 days), North Carolina (417 days), and Texas (437 days). About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions is the curator of the ATTOM Data Warehouse, a multi-sourced national property database that blends property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, health hazards, neighborhood characteristics and other property characteristic data for more than 150 million U.S. residential and commercial properties. The ATTOM Data Warehouse delivers actionable data to businesses, consumers, government agencies, universities, policymakers and the media in multiple ways, including bulk file licenses, APIs and customized reports.
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424,800 U.S. Properties with Foreclosure Filings in First Six Months of 2017, Down 20 Percent from Year Ago
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CoreLogic Reports Mortgage Delinquencies Dropped to a 10-Year Low in March 2017
June 13, 2017, Irvine, Calif. – CoreLogic®, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its monthly Loan Performance Insights Report which shows that, nationally, 4.4 percent of mortgages were in some stage of delinquency (30 days or more past due including those in foreclosure) in March 2017. This represents a 0.8 percentage point decline in the overall delinquency rate compared with March 2016 when it was 5.2 percent. As of March 2017, the foreclosure inventory rate, which measures the share of mortgages in some stage of the foreclosure process, was 0.8 percent compared with 1 percent in March 2016. The serious delinquency rate, defined as 90 days or more past due including loans in foreclosure, was 2.1 percent, down from 2.7 percent in March 2016. Measuring early-stage delinquency rates is important for analyzing the health of the mortgage market. To comprehensively monitor mortgage performance, CoreLogic examines all stages of delinquency as well as transition rates, which indicate the percentage of mortgages moving from one stage of delinquency to the next. Early-stage delinquencies, defined as 30-59 days past due, fell to 1.7 percent in March 2017, down from 1.9 percent in March 2016 and the lowest level since January 2000. The share of mortgages that were 60-89 days past due in March 2017 was 0.59 percent, down slightly from 0.63 percent in March 2016. "Early-stage mortgage performance continues to improve at a steady pace, especially for 30-59-day delinquencies which fell to 1.7 percent, the lowest rate for any month since January 2000," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. "Late-stage serious delinquency rates continue to decline, falling to their lowest levels since November 2007." Since early-stage delinquencies can be volatile, CoreLogic also analyzes transition rates. The share of mortgages that transitioned from current to 30-days past due was 0.6 percent in March 2017, down from 0.7 percent in March 2016 and the lowest for any month since January 2000. By comparison, in January 2007, just before the start of the financial crisis, the current-to-30-day transition rate was 1.2 percent and it peaked in November 2008 at 2 percent. "Dropping delinquency and foreclosure rates reflect the beneficial impact of stringent post-crisis underwriting standards as well as better fundamentals such as higher employment, household formation and home price gains," said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "Looking ahead, we expect these positive trends to continue as the industry shifts its focus toward solving supply shortages and looming affordability crises in an increasing number of markets." For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog. Methodology The data in this report represents foreclosure and delinquency activity reported through March 2017. The data in this report accounts for only first liens against a property and does not include secondary liens. The delinquency, transition, and foreclosure rates are measured only against homes that have an outstanding mortgage. Generally, homes with no mortgage liens are not subject to foreclosure and are, therefore, excluded from the analysis. Approximately one-third of homes nationally are owned outright and do not have a mortgage. CoreLogic has approximately 85 percent coverage of U.S. foreclosure data. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider. The company's combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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Q1 2017 Foreclosure Activity Below Pre-Recession Levels Nationwide and In 47 Percent of U.S. Markets
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CoreLogic Issues US Residential Foreclosure Crisis Decade in Review
  IRVINE, Calif., March 14, 2017—CoreLogic®, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released a 10-year retrospect of the U.S. residential foreclosure crisis, "United States Residential Foreclosure Crisis: 10 Years Later." The report examines the path of the residential foreclosure crisis beginning with the relatively healthy years early in the 2000s, through the peak of the crisis, to present day. The country has started to normalize, recording approximately 22,000 completed foreclosures a month. Completed foreclosures reflect the total number of homes lost to foreclosure. The foreclosure crisis began in some parts of the country as early as 2007 and later peaked nationwide in September 2010, with approximately 120,000 completed foreclosures occurring during that single month. Throughout the crisis years, CoreLogic monitored completed foreclosures, the foreclosure inventory and the serious delinquency rate. Many economists mark the beginning of the foreclosure crisis with the collapse of two Bear Stearns subprime funds in June 2007, with the crisis deepening as a result of the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy in September 2008. Since the beginning of 2007, there have been approximately 7.8 million completed foreclosures nationally. Beginning in Q2 2004 when homeownership rates peaked, there have been approximately 8.6 million homes lost to foreclosure. At the end of 2016, the national foreclosure inventory, which reflects all homes in some stage of the foreclosure process, included approximately 336,000, or 0.9 percent, of all homes with a mortgage compared with 1.4 million homes, or 3.3 percent, at the peak of the residential foreclosure crisis in September 2010. "The country experienced a wild ride in the mortgage market between 2008 and 2012, with the foreclosure peak occurring in 2010," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. "As we look back over 10 years of the foreclosure crisis, we cannot ignore the connection between jobs and homeownership. A healthy economy is driven by jobs coupled with consumer confidence that usually leads to homeownership." During the housing crisis, CoreLogic also reported the number of mortgages in serious delinquency, defined as 90 days or more past due, including loans in foreclosure or REO. The delinquency rate (payments past due by 30, 60 or 90 days) continues to be a leading indicator of troubled markets. At the end of 2016, 1 million mortgages, or 2.6 percent of homes with a mortgage, were in serious delinquency, compared to the serious delinquency peak of 3.7 million mortgages, or 8.6 percent of homes with a mortgage, were in serious delinquency, in January 2010. In recent years, the decline in serious delinquencies has been geographically broad throughout the country with year-over-year decreases from December 2015 to December 2016 in 48 states and the District of Columbia. Highlights of the Residential Foreclosure Crisis: The national completed foreclosure total peaked in 2010 with approximately 1.2 million foreclosures for the year; closely followed by just over 1 million completed foreclosures in 2009. From the peak in 2010, the completed foreclosures steadily declined each year, dropping by nearly 100,000 completed foreclosures per year through 2016. The state with the highest percent of mortgages in the foreclosure inventory was Florida, during June 2011, with 12.5 percent of homes in some stage of the foreclosure process. Of the 10 largest Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSAs) as measured by population, Miami-Miami Beach-Kendall, FL had the highest percent of all homes with a mortgage in the foreclosure inventory at its peak in February 2011. *2016 data was revised. Revisions are standard, and to ensure accuracy CoreLogic incorporates newly released data to provide updated results. **Unemployment data provided by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). City boundaries may not be identical as CoreLogic uses Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSAs) as defined by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). Methodology The data in this report represents foreclosure activity reported through December 2016. This report separates state data into judicial versus non-judicial foreclosure state categories. In judicial foreclosure states, lenders must provide evidence to the courts of delinquency in order to move a borrower into foreclosure. In non-judicial foreclosure states, lenders can issue notices of default directly to the borrower without court intervention. This is an important distinction since judicial states, as a rule, have longer foreclosure timelines, thus affecting foreclosure statistics. A completed foreclosure occurs when a property is auctioned and results in the purchase of the home at auction by either a third party, such as an investor, or by the lender. If the home is purchased by the lender, it is moved into the lender's real estate-owned (REO) inventory. In "foreclosure by advertisement" states, a redemption period begins after the auction and runs for a statutory period, e.g., six months. During that period, the borrower may regain the foreclosed home by paying all amounts due as calculated under the statute. For purposes of this Foreclosure Report, because so few homes are actually redeemed following an auction, it is assumed that the foreclosure process ends in "foreclosure by advertisement" states at the completion of the auction. The foreclosure inventory represents the number and share of mortgaged homes that have been placed into the process of foreclosure by the mortgage servicer. Mortgage servicers start the foreclosure process when the mortgage reaches a specific level of serious delinquency as dictated by the investor for the mortgage loan. Once a foreclosure is "started," and absent the borrower paying all amounts necessary to halt the foreclosure, the home remains in foreclosure until the completed foreclosure results in the sale to a third party at auction or the home enters the lender's REO inventory. The data in this report accounts for only first liens against a property and does not include secondary liens. The foreclosure inventory is measured only against homes that have an outstanding mortgage. Generally, homes with no mortgage liens are not subject to foreclosure and are, therefore, excluded from the analysis. Approximately one-third of homes nationally are owned outright and do not have a mortgage. CoreLogic has approximately 85 percent coverage of U.S. foreclosure data. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider. The company's combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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CoreLogic Reports 21,000 Completed Foreclosures in December 2016
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Black Knight: Foreclosure Rate Fell by 30 Percent in 2016, Most Improvement of Any Year on Record
JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Jan. 23, 2017 -- The Data & Analytics division of Black Knight Financial Services, Inc. reports the following "first look" at December 2016 month-end mortgage performance statistics derived from its loan-level database representing the majority of the national mortgage market. Total U.S. loan delinquency rate (loans 30 or more days past due, but not in foreclosure): 4.42%Month-over-month change: -0.91%Year-over-year change: - 7.49% Total U.S. foreclosure pre-sale inventory rate: 0.95%Month-over-month change: -3.29%Year-over-year change: - 30.53% Total U.S. foreclosure starts: 59,700Month-over-month change: -1.16%Year-over-year change: -23.56% Monthly Prepayment Rate (SMM): 1.35%Month-over-month change: - 5.50%Year-over-year change: 19.08% Foreclosure Sales as % of 90+: 1.78%Month-over-month change: -2.27%Year-over-year change: -5.20% Number of properties that are 30 or more days past due, but not in foreclosure: 2,248,000Month-over-month change: -15,000Year-over-year change: -160,000 Number of properties that are 90 or more days past due, but not in foreclosure: 682,000Month-over-month change: 0Year-over-year change: -126,000 Number of properties in foreclosure pre-sale inventory: 483,000Month-over-month change: -15,000Year-over-year change: -206,000 Number of properties that are 30 or more days past due or in foreclosure: 2,731,000Month-over-month change: -30,000Year-over-year change: -366,000 Top 5 States by Non-Current* PercentageMississippi:      11.36%Louisiana:        10.03%West Virginia:   8.16%Alabama:          7.98%New Jersey:      7.79% Bottom 5 States by Non-Current* PercentageIdaho:               3.08%Montana:          2.95%Minnesota:       2.88%North Dakota:   2.50%Colorado:         2.44% Top 5 States by 90+ Days Delinquent PercentageMississippi:      3.44%Louisiana:        3.25%Alabama:         2.37%Arkansas:        2.12%Tennessee:      1.97% Top 5 States by 6-Month Improvement in Non-Current* PercentageNew Jersey:                 -11.56%Oregon:                        -10.19%Washington:                 -9.31%Nevada:                        -8.24%District of Columbia:      -7.89% Top 5 States by 6-Month Deterioration in Non-Current* PercentageLouisiana:         9.24%Wyoming:         6.73%Kansas:            6.71%West Virginia:   5.77%Michigan:          5.44% *Non-current totals combine foreclosures and delinquencies as a percent of active loans in that state. Notes:1) Totals are extrapolated based on Black Knight Financial Services' loan-level database of mortgage assets.2) All whole numbers are rounded to the nearest thousand, except foreclosure starts, which are rounded to the nearest hundred. For a more detailed view of this month's "first look" data, please visit the Black Knight newsroom at http://www.bkfs.com/CorporateInformation/NewsRoom/Pages/20170123.aspx The company will provide a more in-depth review of this data in its monthly Mortgage Monitor report, which includes an analysis of data supplemented by detailed charts and graphs that reflect trend and point-in-time observations. The Mortgage Monitor report will be available online here by Feb. 6, 2017. About Black Knight Financial Services, Inc. Black Knight Financial Services, Inc. (NYSE: BKFS) is a leading provider of integrated technology, data and analytics solutions that facilitate and automate many of the business processes across the mortgage lifecycle. Black Knight Financial Services is committed to being a premier business partner that lenders and servicers rely on to achieve their strategic goals, realize greater success and better serve their customers by delivering best-in-class technology, services and insight with a relentless commitment to excellence, innovation, integrity and leadership. For more information on Black Knight Financial Services, please visit www.bkfs.com.
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity Drops to 10-Year Low in 2016
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Freddie Mac Announces Holiday Eviction Moratorium Dec. 19, 2016 to Jan. 3, 2017
MCLEAN, VA--(Dec 12, 2016) - Freddie Mac announced today a nationwide suspension of eviction lock-outs between Dec. 19, 2016 and Jan. 3, 2017. The moratorium applies to all foreclosed, occupied homes owned by Freddie Mac. "Our announcement today is to help provide families with a greater measure of certainty during the upcoming holiday season. We also want to be sure families experiencing financial hardship are aware of the options available to them. Those who are facing possible foreclosure should reach out to their mortgage servicers and explore the alternatives that are in place to help homeowners year-round," said Chris Bowden, Senior Vice President of REO at Freddie Mac. The holiday suspension will apply to eviction lockouts on Freddie Mac-owned REO homes but will not affect other pre- or post-foreclosure activities. Companies managing local evictions for Freddie Mac may continue to file documentation as needed during the suspension period. Freddie Mac has helped more than 1.1 million financially troubled borrowers avoid foreclosure. For more information on Freddie Mac mortgage relief, visit My Home by Freddie Mac(SM). About Freddie MacFreddie Mac was established by Congress in 1970 to provide liquidity, stability and affordability to the nation's residential mortgage markets. Freddie Mac supports communities across the nation by providing mortgage capital to lenders. Today Freddie Mac is making home possible for approximately one in four home borrowers and is the largest source of financing for multifamily housing. Additional information is available at FreddieMac.com.
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CoreLogic Reports 30,000 Completed Foreclosures in October 2016
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CoreLogic Reports 36,000 Completed Foreclosures in September 2016
  November 08, 2016, Irvine, Calif. – CoreLogic®, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its September 2016 National Foreclosure Report which shows the foreclosure inventory declined by 31.1 percent and completed foreclosures declined by 7.0 percent compared with September 2015. The number of completed foreclosures nationwide decreased year over year from 39,000 in September 2015 to 36,000 in September 2016, representing a decrease of 69.7 percent from the peak of 118,222 in September 2010. The foreclosure inventory represents the number of homes at some stage of the foreclosure process and completed foreclosures reflect the total number of homes lost to foreclosure. Since the financial crisis began in September 2008, there have been approximately 6.4 million completed foreclosures nationally, and since homeownership rates peaked in the second quarter of 2004, there have been approximately 8.5 million homes lost to foreclosure. As of September 2016, the national foreclosure inventory included approximately 340,000, or 0.9 percent, of all homes with a mortgage, compared with 493,000 homes, or 1.3 percent, in September 2015. CoreLogic also reports that the number of mortgages in serious delinquency (defined as 90 days or more past due including loans in foreclosure or REO) declined by 24.8 percent from September 2015 to September 2016, with 1 million mortgages, or 2.6 percent, in serious delinquency, the lowest level since August 2007. The decline was geographically broad with decreases in serious delinquency in 48 states and the District of Columbia. "September's serious delinquency rate dropped by 25 percent compared to a year earlier, the third consecutive monthly acceleration in the rate of decline," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. "This improvement is continued evidence of the recovery in the housing market, especially given that the decreases were fairly uniform in most cities across the country." "Completed foreclosures have fallen by a total of more than 100,000 homes during the 12 months prior to September 2016," said Anand Nallathambi, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "The decline in foreclosures is one of the drivers in the drop in vacancies, which is positive for homeowners and communities. Heading into 2017 we see that prices, performance and production – the three most important drivers of the real estate market – are all improving." Additional September 2016 highlights: On a month-over-month basis, completed foreclosures increased by 5.2 percent to 36,000 in September 2016 from the 34,000 reported for August 2016.* As a basis of comparison, before the decline in the housing market in 2007, completed foreclosures averaged 21,000 per month nationwide between 2000 and 2006. On a month-over-month basis, the September 2016 foreclosure inventory was down 3.1 percent compared with August 2016.The five states with the highest number of completed foreclosures in the 12 months ending in September 2016 were Florida (53,000), Texas (27,000), Michigan (24,000), Ohio (23,000) and Georgia (21,000). These five states accounted for 36 percent of completed foreclosures nationally. Four states and the District of Columbia had the lowest number of completed foreclosures in the 12 months ending in September 2016: the District of Columbia (186), North Dakota (338), West Virginia (447), Alaska (643) and Montana (701). Four states and the District of Columbia had the highest foreclosure inventory rate in September 2016: New Jersey (3.0 percent), New York (2.7 percent), Maine (1.8 percent), Hawaii (1.8 percent) and the District of Columbia (1.6 percent). The five states with the lowest foreclosure inventory rate in September 2016 were Colorado (0.3 percent), Minnesota (0.3 percent), Arizona (0.3 percent), Michigan (0.3 percent) and Utah (0.3). *August 2016 data was revised. Revisions are standard, and to ensure accuracy CoreLogic incorporates newly released data to provide updated results. For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog: www.corelogic.com/blog. Methodology The data in this report represents foreclosure activity reported through September 2016. This report separates state data into judicial versus non-judicial foreclosure state categories. In judicial foreclosure states, lenders must provide evidence to the courts of delinquency in order to move a borrower into foreclosure. In non-judicial foreclosure states, lenders can issue notices of default directly to the borrower without court intervention. This is an important distinction since judicial states, as a rule, have longer foreclosure timelines, thus affecting foreclosure statistics. A completed foreclosure occurs when a property is auctioned and results in the purchase of the home at auction by either a third party, such as an investor, or by the lender. If the home is purchased by the lender, it is moved into the lender's real estate-owned (REO) inventory. In "foreclosure by advertisement" states, a redemption period begins after the auction and runs for a statutory period, e.g., six months. During that period, the borrower may regain the foreclosed home by paying all amounts due as calculated under the statute. For purposes of this Foreclosure Report, because so few homes are actually redeemed following an auction, it is assumed that the foreclosure process ends in "foreclosure by advertisement" states at the completion of the auction. The foreclosure inventory represents the number and share of mortgaged homes that have been placed into the process of foreclosure by the mortgage servicer. Mortgage servicers start the foreclosure process when the mortgage reaches a specific level of serious delinquency as dictated by the investor for the mortgage loan. Once a foreclosure is "started," and absent the borrower paying all amounts necessary to halt the foreclosure, the home remains in foreclosure until the completed foreclosure results in the sale to a third party at auction or the home enters the lender's REO inventory. The data in this report accounts for only first liens against a property and does not include secondary liens. The foreclosure inventory is measured only against homes that have an outstanding mortgage. Generally, homes with no mortgage liens are not subject to foreclosure and are, therefore, excluded from the analysis. Approximately one-third of homes nationally are owned outright and do not have a mortgage. CoreLogic has approximately 85 percent coverage of U.S. foreclosure data. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider. The company's combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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Distressed Home Sales Drop to Nine-Year Low in Q3 2016
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Post-'Brexit' Prepay Activity Remains Strong; Foreclosure Rate Falls to Nine-Year Low
JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Oct. 25, 2016 -- The Data & Analytics division of Black Knight Financial Services, Inc. reports the following "first look" atSeptember 2016 month-end mortgage performance statistics derived from its loan-level database representing the majority of the national mortgage market. Total U.S. loan delinquency rate (loans 30 or more days past due, but not in foreclosure): 4.27%Month-over-month change: 0.74%Year-over-year change: -12.24% Total U.S. foreclosure pre-sale inventory rate: 1.00%Month-over-month change: -3.38%Year-over-year change: -31.23% Total U.S. foreclosure starts: 61,700Month-over-month change: -10.32%Year-over-year change: -22.78% Monthly Prepayment Rate (SMM): 1.54%Month-over-month change: -7.59%Year-over-year change: 43.22% Foreclosure Sales as % of 90+: 2.03%Month-over-month change: -5.82%Year-over-year change: 2.47% Number of properties that are 30 or more days past due, but not in foreclosure: 2,165,000Month-over-month change: 14,000Year-over-year change: -292,000 Number of properties that are 90 or more days past due, but not in foreclosure: 668,000Month-over-month change: -1,000Year-over-year change: -149,000 Number of properties in foreclosure pre-sale inventory: 509,000Month-over-month change: -18,000Year-over-year change: -228,000 Number of properties that are 30 or more days past due or in foreclosure: 2,674,000Month-over-month change: -4,000Year-over-year change: -520,000 Top 5 States by Non-Current* Percentage Mississippi: 11.16% Louisiana: 10.32% New Jersey: 8.13% Alabama: 7.85% West Virginia: 7.72% Bottom 5 States by Non-Current* Percentage South Dakota: 2.95% Montana: 2.88% Minnesota: 2.75% Colorado: 2.44% North Dakota: 2.23% Top 5 States by 90+ Days Delinquent Percentage Mississippi: 3.43% Louisiana: 2.80% Alabama: 2.33% Arkansas: 2.01% Tennessee: 1.94% Top 5 States by 6-Month Improvement in Non-Current* Percentage Hawaii: -12.72% Nevada: -11.64% Oregon: -11.47% New Jersey: -10.46% Washington: -9.32% Top 5 States by 6-Month Deterioration in Non-Current* Percentage Alaska: 20.37% Wyoming: 18.91% Louisiana: 16.10% North Dakota: 10.67% Michigan: 8.49% *Non-current totals combine foreclosures and delinquencies as a percent of active loans in that state. Notes: Totals are extrapolated based on Black Knight Financial Services' loan-level database of mortgage assets. All whole numbers are rounded to the nearest thousand. For a more detailed view of this month's "first look" data, please visit the Black Knight newsroom at http://www.blackknightcompanies.com/CorporateInformation/NewsRoom/Pages/20161025.aspx The company will provide a more in-depth review of this data in its monthly Mortgage Monitor report, which includes an analysis of data supplemented by detailed charts and graphs that reflect trend and point-in-time observations. The Mortgage Monitor report will be available online at http://www.bkfs.com/CorporateInformation/NewsRoom/Pages/Mortgage-Monitor.aspx by November 7, 2016. About Black Knight Financial Services, Inc.Black Knight Financial Services, Inc. (NYSE: BKFS), a Fidelity National Financial (NYSE:FNF) company, is a leading provider of integrated technology, data and analytics solutions that facilitate and automate many of the business processes across the mortgage lifecycle. Black Knight Financial Services is committed to being a premier business partner that lenders and servicers rely on to achieve their strategic goals, realize greater success and better serve their customers by delivering best-in-class technology, services and insight with a relentless commitment to excellence, innovation, integrity and leadership. For more information on Black Knight Financial Services, please visit www.bkfs.com.
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The Foreclosure Gender Gap: Foreclosure Rates Higher for Male Homeowners than Female Homeowners
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September Foreclosure Activity Decreases 24 Percent From a Year Ago to Lowest Level Since December 2005
IRVINE, CA (October 13, 2016) - ATTOM Data Solutions, the nation's leading source for comprehensive housing data and the new parent company of RealtyTrac, today released its September and Q3 2016 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report™, which shows a total of 82,972 properties with foreclosure filings -- default notices, scheduled auctions or bank repossessions -- in September, down 13 percent from the previous month and down 24 percent from a year ago to the lowest level since December 2005. There were a total of 293,190 U.S. properties with foreclosure filings in Q3 2016, up 4 percent from the previous quarter but down 10 percent from a year ago. It was the fourth consecutive quarter where foreclosure activity has decreased on a year-over-year basis. "Foreclosure activity has been on a steady slide downward over the past six years, finally dropping back below pre-crisis levels in September," said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president at ATTOM Data Solutions. "While we've known that the national foreclosure problem has been dying a long, slow death for quite some time, the final nail in the coffin of the foreclosure crisis is the year-over-year decrease in the average foreclosure timeline nationwide that we saw in Q3 2016 -- the first time that's happened since we began tracking foreclosure timelines in Q1 2007. "The decrease in the average foreclosure timeline indicates that banks have worked through the bulk of the legacy foreclosure backlog in most states -- with a few lingering exceptions -- and that most of the foreclosures being completed now are relatively recent defaults that are more efficiently progressing through the foreclosure pipeline," Blomquist added. Click to view full size: Average time to foreclose decreases annually for first time in report historyProperties foreclosed in Q3 2016 took an average of 625 days to complete foreclosure, down from 631 days in the previous quarter and down from 630 days a year ago -- the first year-over-year decrease since ATTOM began tracking average foreclosure timelines in Q1 2007. The average time to foreclose decreased from a year ago in 19 states, including Nevada (down 22 percent), Massachusetts (down 22 percent), Michigan (down 21 percent), Oregon (down 20 percent), and Texas (down 20 percent). States with the shortest foreclosure timelines for properties foreclosed in the third quarter were Virginia (196 days), New Hampshire (230 days), Texas (246 days), Minnesota (250 days), and Mississippi (253 days). All five states with the shortest foreclosure timelines employ the non-judicial foreclosure process. New Jersey, Hawaii, New York, Florida, Illinois with longest foreclosure timelinesCounter to the national trend, the average time to foreclose in Q3 2016 increased from a year ago in 27 states, including Pennsylvania (up 28 percent), Wisconsin (up 25 percent), Maryland (up 22 percent), Arizona (up 21 percent), and Colorado (up 20 percent). States with the longest average foreclosure timelines for properties foreclosed in the third quarter were New Jersey (1,262 days); Hawaii (1,241 days); New York (1,070 days); Florida (1,038 days); and Illinois (942 days). All five states with the longest foreclosure timelines primarily employ the judicial foreclosure process. Delaware, New Jersey, Nevada post highest state foreclosure rates in SeptemberThe report showed a national foreclosure rate of one in every 1,600 U.S. properties with a foreclosure filing in September. States with the highest foreclosure rates in September were Delaware (one in every 680 housing units with a foreclosure filing); New Jersey (one in every 691); Nevada (one in every 897); Illinois (one in every 946); and Florida (one in every 950). Other states with foreclosure rates in the top 10 highest nationwide in September were Maryland (one in every 955 housing units with a foreclosure filing); South Carolina (one in every 1,049); Utah (one in every 1,258); Connecticut (one in every 1,290); and New Mexico (one in every 1,324). Atlantic City, Rockford, Columbia post highest metro foreclosure rates in SeptemberAmong 216 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000, those with the highest foreclosure rates in September were Atlantic City, New Jersey (one in every 375 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Rockford, Illinois (one in every 597); Columbia, South Carolina (one in every 629); Tampa-St. Petersburg, Florida (one in every 710); and Jacksonville, Florida (one in every 722). Other metro areas with foreclosure rates in the top 10 highest in September were Medford, Oregon (one in every 742 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Lakeland-Winter Haven, Florida (one in every 755); Chicago (one in every 767); Philadelphia (one in every 771); and Bakersfield, California (one in every 778). September foreclosure starts drop to more than 11-year lowA total of 34,685 properties started the foreclosure process in September, down 13 percent from the previous month and down 20 percent from a year ago to the lowest level since May 2005 -- a more than 11-year low. Counter to the national trend, 18 states posted year-over-year increases in foreclosure starts in September, including Arkansas (up 156 percent); Delaware (up 115 percent); Maryland (up 87 percent); Utah (up 63 percent); and Oklahoma (up 47 percent). September bank repossessions decrease 32 percent from year agoThere were 27,514 properties repossessed by lenders (REO) in September, down 12 percent from the previous month and down 32 percent from a year ago to the lowest level since February 2015. Counter to the national trend, nine states posted a year-over-year increase in REO activity in September, including Arizona (up 44 percent); Massachusetts (up 40 percent); Washington (up 18 percent); Connecticut (up 16 percent); and California (up 12 percent). Investors purchase 44 percent of properties sold at foreclosure auction in Q3 2016Third-party investors purchased 44 percent of all properties sold at foreclosure auction in the third quarter, with the remaining 56 percent transferring back to the foreclosing lender at the auction. The 44 percent sold to third-party investors was the highest share going back as far as Q1 2000 -- the earliest data is available -- and well above the pre-recession peak of 30 percent in Q2 2005. Of the properties sold to third-party investors at the foreclosure auction in Q3 2016, 38 percent were sold to institutional investors, defined as entities purchasing at least 10 properties in a calendar year. That was up from 32 percent in the previous quarter and 26 percent a year ago but still below the peak of 70 percent in Q2 2009. Report methodologyThe ATTOM Data Solutions U.S. Foreclosure Market Report provides a count of the total number of properties with at least one foreclosure filing entered into the ATTOM Data Warehouse during the month -- broken out by type of filing. Some foreclosure filings entered into the database during the month may have been recorded in previous months. Data is collected from more than 2,200 counties nationwide, and those counties account for more than 90 percent of the U.S. population. ATTOM's report incorporates documents filed in all three phases of foreclosure: Default - Notice of Default (NOD) and Lis Pendens (LIS); Auction- Notice of Trustee's Sale and Notice of Foreclosure Sale (NTS and NFS); and Real Estate Owned, or REO properties (that have been foreclosed on and repurchased by a bank). The report does not count a property again if it receives the same type of foreclosure filing multiple times within the estimated foreclosure timeframe for the state where the property is located. About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions is the curator of the ATTOM Data Warehouse, a multi-sourced national property database that aggregates property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, health hazards, neighborhood characteristics and other property characteristic data for more than 150 million U.S. properties. The ATTOM Data Warehouse delivers actionable data to businesses, consumers, government agencies, universities, policymakers and the media in multiple ways, including bulk file licenses, APIs and customized reports. ATTOM Data Solutions also powers consumer websites designed to promote real estate transparency: RealtyTrac.com is a property search and research portal for foreclosures and other off-market properties; Homefacts.com is a neighborhood research portal providing hyperlocal risks and amenities information; HomeDisclosure.com produces detailed property pre-diligence reports. ATTOM Data and its associated brands are cited by thousands of media outlets each month, including frequent mentions on CBS Evening News, The Today Show, CNBC, CNN, FOX News, PBS NewsHour and in The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and USA TODAY.
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CoreLogic Reports 37,000 Completed Foreclosures in August 2016
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CoreLogic Reports 38,000 Completed Foreclosures in June 2016
  August 09, 2016, Irvine, Calif. – CoreLogic®, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its June 2016 National Foreclosure Report which shows the foreclosure inventory declined by 25.9 percent and completed foreclosures declined by 4.9 percent compared with June 2015. The number of completed foreclosures nationwide decreased year over year from 40,000 in June 2015 to 38,000 in June 2016, representing a decrease of 67.5 percent from the peak of 117,835 in September 2010. The foreclosure inventory represents the number of homes at some stage of the foreclosure process and completed foreclosures reflect the total number of homes lost to foreclosure. Since the financial crisis began in September 2008, there have been approximately 6.3 million completed foreclosures nationally, and since homeownership rates peaked in the second quarter of 2004, there have been approximately 8.4 million homes lost to foreclosure. As of June 2016, the national foreclosure inventory included approximately 375,000, or 1.0 percent, of all homes with a mortgage compared with 507,000 homes, or 1.3 percent, in June 2015. The June 2016 foreclosure inventory rate is the lowest for any month since August 2007. CoreLogic also reports that the number of mortgages in serious delinquency (defined as 90 days or more past due including loans in foreclosure or REO) declined by 21.3 percent from June 2015 to June 2016, with 1.1 million mortgages, or 2.8 percent, in this category. The June 2016 serious delinquency rate is the lowest in nearly nine years, since September 2007. "Mortgage loan performance depends on the economic health of local markets, with varied differences even within a state," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. "Within Texas, the serious delinquency rate in the Dallas metropolitan area has fallen by 0.5 percent from a year earlier, as home prices and employment have continued to rise. The rate in the Midland area, on the other hand, has jumped 0.5 percent, reflecting the weakness in oil production and job loss over the past year." "The impact of the inexorable reduction over the past several years in both foreclosure trends and serious delinquencies is driving the long-awaited return to more historic norms for the U.S. housing market," said Anand Nallathambi, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "We expect the combination of continued home price appreciation of more than 5 percent and rising employment levels in the year ahead will help cement the gains we have had and perhaps accelerate them." Additional June 2016 highlights: On a month-over-month basis, completed foreclosures increased by 5.1 percent to 38,000 in June 2016 from the 36,000 reported for May 2016.* As a basis of comparison, before the decline in the housing market in 2007, completed foreclosures averaged 21,000 per month nationwide between 2000 and 2006. On a month-over-month basis, the foreclosure inventory was down 3.6 percent compared with May 2016. The five states with the highest number of completed foreclosures in the 12 months ending in June 2016 were Florida (60,000), Michigan (47,000), Texas (27,000), Ohio (23,000) and California (22,000). These five states account for almost 40 percent of all completed foreclosures nationally. Four states and the District of Columbia had the lowest number of completed foreclosures: The District of Columbia (179), North Dakota (321), West Virginia (487), Alaska (639) and Montana (675). Four states and the District of Columbia had the highest foreclosure inventory rate: New Jersey (3.4 percent), New York (3.1 percent), the District of Columbia (2 percent), Hawaii (2 percent) and Maine (1.9 percent). The five states with the lowest foreclosure inventory rate were Colorado (0.3 percent), Michigan (0.3 percent), Minnesota (0.3 percent), Nebraska (0.3 percent) and Utah (0.3 percent). *May 2016 data was revised. Revisions are standard, and to ensure accuracy CoreLogic incorporates newly released data to provide updated results. For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog: http://www.corelogic.com/blog. Methodology The data in this report represents foreclosure activity reported through June 2016. This report separates state data into judicial versus non-judicial foreclosure state categories. In judicial foreclosure states, lenders must provide evidence to the courts of delinquency in order to move a borrower into foreclosure. In non-judicial foreclosure states, lenders can issue notices of default directly to the borrower without court intervention. This is an important distinction since judicial states, as a rule, have longer foreclosure timelines, thus affecting foreclosure statistics. A completed foreclosure occurs when a property is auctioned and results in the purchase of the home at auction by either a third party, such as an investor, or by the lender. If the home is purchased by the lender, it is moved into the lender's real estate-owned (REO) inventory. In "foreclosure by advertisement" states, a redemption period begins after the auction and runs for a statutory period, e.g., six months. During that period, the borrower may regain the foreclosed home by paying all amounts due as calculated under the statute. For purposes of this Foreclosure Report, because so few homes are actually redeemed following an auction, it is assumed that the foreclosure process ends in "foreclosure by advertisement" states at the completion of the auction. The foreclosure inventory represents the number and share of mortgaged homes that have been placed into the process of foreclosure by the mortgage servicer. Mortgage servicers start the foreclosure process when the mortgage reaches a specific level of serious delinquency as dictated by the investor for the mortgage loan. Once a foreclosure is "started," and absent the borrower paying all amounts necessary to halt the foreclosure, the home remains in foreclosure until the completed foreclosure results in the sale to a third party at auction or the home enters the lender's REO inventory. The data in this report accounts for only first liens against a property and does not include secondary liens. The foreclosure inventory is measured only against homes that have an outstanding mortgage. Generally, homes with no mortgage liens are not subject to foreclosure and are, therefore, excluded from the analysis. Approximately one-third of homes nationally are owned outright and do not have a mortgage. CoreLogic has approximately 85 percent coverage of U.S. foreclosure data. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider. The company's combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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CoreLogic Reports 38,000 Completed Foreclosures in May 2016
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CoreLogic Reports 37,000 Completed Foreclosures in April 2016
  June 14, 2016, Irvine, Calif., – CoreLogic®, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled services provider, today released its April 2016 National Foreclosure Report which shows the foreclosure inventory declined by 23.4 percent and completed foreclosures declined by 15.8 percent compared with April 2015. The number of completed foreclosures nationwide decreased year over year from 43,000 in April 2015 to 37,000 in April 2016, representing a decrease of 68.9 percent from the peak of 117,813 in September 2010. The foreclosure inventory represents the number of homes at some stage of the foreclosure process and completed foreclosures reflect the total number of homes lost to foreclosure. Since the financial crisis began in September 2008, there have been approximately 6.2 million completed foreclosures nationally, and since homeownership rates peaked in the second quarter of 2004, there have been approximately 8.3 million homes lost to foreclosure. As of April 2016, the national foreclosure inventory included approximately 406,000, or 1.1 percent, of all homes with a mortgage compared with 530,000 homes, or 1.4 percent, in April 2015. The April 2016 foreclosure inventory rate is the lowest for any month since September 2007. CoreLogic also reports that the number of mortgages in serious delinquency (defined as 90 days or more past due including loans in foreclosure or REO) declined by 21.6 percent from April 2015 to April 2016, with 1.1 million mortgages, or 3 percent, in this category. The April 2016 serious delinquency rate is the lowest in more than eight years, since October 2007. "The recovery in home prices and improved labor market have contributed to the drop in seriously delinquent rates," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. "Over the 12 months through April, the CoreLogic Home Price Index for the U.S. rose 6.2 percent and the labor market gained 2.6 million jobs. We also found that the seriously delinquent rate fell by about three-quarters of a percentage point." "The number of homeowners who have negative equity has fallen by two-thirds since its 2010 peak, and the number of borrowers in foreclosure proceedings has also continued to drop," said Anand Nallathambi, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "Despite this progress, about four million homeowners remained underwater at the end of the first quarter, and these borrowers are more vulnerable to foreclosure proceedings if they should fall delinquent." Additional April 2016 highlights: On a month-over-month basis, completed foreclosures increased by 0.3 percent to 37,000 in April 2016 from the 36,000 reported for March 2016.* As a basis of comparison, before the decline in the housing market in 2007, completed foreclosures averaged 21,000 per month nationwide between 2000 and 2006. On a month-over-month basis, the foreclosure inventory was down 3 percent compared with March 2016. The five states with the highest number of completed foreclosures for the 12 months ending in March 2016 were Florida (69,000), Michigan (48,000), Texas (28,000), Georgia (23,000) and California (23,000). These five states accounted for about 41 percent of all completed foreclosures nationally. Four states and the District of Columbia had the lowest number of completed foreclosures: The District of Columbia (128), North Dakota (317), West Virginia (482), Alaska (653) and Montana (695). Four states and the District of Columbia had the highest foreclosure inventory rate: New Jersey (3.7 percent), New York (3.2 percent), Hawaii (2.2 percent), the District of Columbia (2.1 percent) and Florida (2 percent). The five states with the lowest foreclosure inventory rate were Alaska (0.3 percent), Minnesota (0.3 percent), Utah (0.4 percent), Arizona (0.4 percent) and Colorado (0.4 percent). *March 2016 data was revised. Revisions are standard, and to ensure accuracy CoreLogic incorporates newly released data to provide updated results. For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog: http://www.corelogic.com/blog. Methodology The data in this report represents foreclosure activity reported through April 2016. This report separates state data into judicial versus non-judicial foreclosure state categories. In judicial foreclosure states, lenders must provide evidence to the courts of delinquency in order to move a borrower into foreclosure. In non-judicial foreclosure states, lenders can issue notices of default directly to the borrower without court intervention. This is an important distinction since judicial states, as a rule, have longer foreclosure timelines, thus affecting foreclosure statistics. A completed foreclosure occurs when a property is auctioned and results in the purchase of the home at auction by either a third party, such as an investor, or by the lender. If the home is purchased by the lender, it is moved into the lender's real estate-owned (REO) inventory. In "foreclosure by advertisement" states, a redemption period begins after the auction and runs for a statutory period, e.g., six months. During that period, the borrower may regain the foreclosed home by paying all amounts due as calculated under the statute. For purposes of this Foreclosure Report, because so few homes are actually redeemed following an auction, it is assumed that the foreclosure process ends in "foreclosure by advertisement" states at the completion of the auction. The foreclosure inventory represents the number and share of mortgaged homes that have been placed into the process of foreclosure by the mortgage servicer. Mortgage servicers start the foreclosure process when the mortgage reaches a specific level of serious delinquency as dictated by the investor for the mortgage loan. Once a foreclosure is "started," and absent the borrower paying all amounts necessary to halt the foreclosure, the home remains in foreclosure until the completed foreclosure results in the sale to a third party at auction or the home enters the lender's REO inventory. The data in this report accounts for only first liens against a property and does not include secondary liens. The foreclosure inventory is measured only against homes that have an outstanding mortgage. Generally, homes with no mortgage liens are not subject to foreclosure and are, therefore, excluded from the analysis. Approximately one-third of homes nationally are owned outright and do not have a mortgage. CoreLogic has approximately 85 percent coverage of U.S. foreclosure data. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled services provider. The company's combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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First Look at April Mortgage Data: Lowest Number of Foreclosure Starts in 10 Years; Prepay Activity Falls Despite Low Rates
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Vacant "Zombie" Foreclosures Decrease 30 Percent in Second Quarter 2016 Compared to a Year Ago
IRVINE, CA--(May 19, 2016) - RealtyTrac®, the nation's leading source for comprehensive housing data, today released its Q2 2016 U.S. Residential Property Vacancy and Zombie Foreclosure Report13, which shows nearly 1.4 million (1,398,046) U.S. residential properties (1 to 4 units) representing 1.6 percent of all residential properties were vacant as of May 2016, up 2.7 percent from the previous quarter when 1,361,628 U.S. residential properties were vacant. The report also shows that 19,187 U.S. residential properties actively in the foreclosure process were vacant (zombie foreclosures), representing 4.7 percent of all residential properties in foreclosure -- down 3.1 percent from the previous month and down 30.1 percent from a year ago. The analysis used RealtyTrac's publicly recorded real estate data -- including foreclosure status, and owner-occupancy status -- matched against monthly updated vacancy data from the U.S. Postal Service. "Lenders have been taking advantage of the strong seller's market to dispose of lingering foreclosure inventory over the past year, evidenced by 12 consecutive months of increasing bank repossessions ending in February and now evidenced by these numbers showing a sharp drop in vacant zombie foreclosures compared to a year ago," said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president at RealtyTrac. "As these zombie foreclosures hit the market for sale they are providing a modicum of relief for the pressure cooker of escalating prices and deteriorating affordability that have defined the U.S. housing market in recent years." Markets with the most zombie foreclosures States with the most vacant "zombie" foreclosures were New Jersey (4,003), New York (3,352), Florida (2,467), Illinois (1,074), and Ohio (1,064). "While overall foreclosure activity has declined from last year, we have experienced a slight increase in vacancies of residential properties facing foreclosure," said Michael Mahon, president at HER Realtors, covering the Cincinnati, Dayton and Columbus markets in Ohio. "As market supply and availability has remained low in many areas of the state, loan servicing companies have stepped up efforts of addressing homeowners delinquent on their mortgages, and have accelerated the process of filing for foreclosure. Feeling the pressure of loan servicers, many homeowners give up hope early, thus creating the vacancy event." Among states with at least 100 zombie foreclosures, those with the highest zombie foreclosure rate (percentage of properties in foreclosure that are vacant) were Oregon (11.8 percent); Indiana (9.5 percent); Kentucky (8.0 percent); Maryland (7.2 percent); and Washington (6.6 percent). "Thanks to the Seattle area's robust economy and strong housing market, the level of vacant properties has been growing smaller and smaller each month. So too has the level of zombie foreclosures which banks continue to release to the market," said Matthew Gardner, chief economist at Windermere Real Estate, covering the Seattle market, where the zombie foreclosure rate in Q2 2016 was 6.1 percent, down 3.8 percent from the previous quarter. "In its own small way, these zombie properties are actually helping to supplement the depleted inventory levels in Seattle. I expect this trend to continue as Seattle's foreclosure activity closes in on its long-term average." Among metropolitan statistical areas with at least 100,000 residential properties, those with the most zombie foreclosures were New York (3,526); Philadelphia (1,744); Chicago (857); Miami (651); and Tampa (627). Metro areas with at least 100 zombie foreclosures that posted the highest zombie foreclosure rate (percent of foreclosure properties that are vacant) were St. Louis, Missouri (10.6 percent); Indianapolis, Indiana (10.2 percent); Albany, New York (9.8 percent); Baltimore, Maryland (9.7 percent); and Portland, Oregon (9.7 percent). Vacant bank-owned properties down 5 percent from previous quarter A total of 43,602 U.S. bank-owned (REO) residential properties were vacant as of May 2016, representing 15.9 percent of all REO residential properties -- down 5.0 percent from the previous quarter when there were 45,897 vacant bank-owned properties. States with the highest percentage of REO properties that were vacant were Oregon (29.8 percent); Indiana (29.7 percent); Delaware (28.3 percent); Michigan (27.0 percent); and Ohio (25.0 percent). Among metropolitan statistical areas with at least 100,000 residential properties, those with the most vacant REOs were Detroit (3,982); Chicago (1,967); Miami (1,765); Atlanta (1,470); and Baltimore (1,434). Metro areas with the highest REO vacancy rates (percentage of REOs that were vacant) were Flint, Michigan (44.7 percent); Akron, Ohio (37.6 percent); Cleveland, Ohio (33.8 percent); Peoria, Illinois (33.2 percent); and Fort Wayne, Indiana (33.1 percent). Markets with highest vacancy rates States with the highest vacancy rate overall (not just properties in foreclosure) were Michigan (3.4 percent), Indiana (3.1 percent), Mississippi (2.8 percent), Alabama (2.6 percent), and Oklahoma (2.6 percent). Among 146 metropolitan statistical areas with at least 100,000 residential properties, those with the highest vacancy rates were Flint, Michigan (7.2 percent); Youngstown, Ohio (4.7 percent); Detroit, Michigan (4.4 percent); Beaumont-Port Arthur, Texas (3.9 percent); and Mobile, Alabama (3.7 percent). Markets with lowest vacancy rates Metro areas with the lowest vacancy rates were San Jose, California (0.2 percent); Fort Collins, Colorado (0.2 percent); Manchester, New Hampshire (0.3 percent); Provo, Utah (0.3 percent); and Lancaster, Pennsylvania (0.3 percent). Investment properties account for 75 percent of all vacant homes A total of 1.1 million (1,055,725) U.S. residential investment properties were vacant as of May 2016, 75 percent of the all vacant properties nationwide and representing 4.4 percent of all investment properties. States with the highest residential investment property vacancy rate were Michigan (11.0 percent); Indiana (10.3 percent); Alabama (7.1 percent); Ohio (6.8 percent); and Mississippi (6.7 percent). Metro areas with the highest residential investment property vacancy rate were Flint, Michigan (27.6 percent); Detroit (13.5 percent); South Bend, Indiana (12.8 percent); Youngstown, Ohio (12.5 percent); and Fort Wayne, Indiana (12.0 percent). Methodology RealtyTrac matched its address-level property data for nearly 85 million U.S. residential properties -- including foreclosure status, owner-occupancy status, and equity -- against monthly updated data from the U.S. Postal Service indicating whether a property had been flagged as vacant by the postal carrier. Only metropolitan statistical areas with at least 100,000 residential properties were included in the rankings. About RealtyTracRealtyTrac collects and licenses multi-sourced public record real estate data -- including tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, and proprietary neighborhood and parcel-level risk -- for more than 150 million U.S. properties, providing access to that data for businesses, consumers, policy makers and the media in a variety of venues all designed to increase real estate transparency: RealtyTrac.com is a property search and research portal for foreclosures and other off-market properties; Homefacts.com is a neighborhood research portal providing hyperlocal risks and amenities; HomeDisclosure.com produces detailed property pre-diligence reports; and RealtyTrac Data Solutions delivers real estate data and analysis to businesses through bulk file licenses, APIs, trend reports, and customized marketing lists. RealtyTrac data is cited by thousands of media outlets each month, including frequent mentions on CBS Evening News, The Today Show, CNBC, CNN, FOX News, PBS NewsHour and in The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and USA TODAY.
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CoreLogic Reports 36,000 Completed Foreclosures in March 2016
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Q1 2016 Foreclosure Activity Below Pre-Recession Levels in 36 Percent of U.S. Housing Markets
IRVINE, CA--(April 14, 2016) - RealtyTrac®, the nation's leading source for comprehensive housing data, today released its Q1 and March 2016 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report™, which shows first quarter foreclosure activity was below pre-recession levels in 78 out of 216 U.S. metropolitan statistical areas (36 percent) analyzed in the report. Nationwide, the report shows foreclosure filings -- default notices, scheduled auctions and bank repossessions -- were reported on 289,116 U.S. properties in the first quarter of 2016, down 4 percent from the previous quarter and down 8 percent from the first quarter of 2015 to the lowest quarterly total since the fourth quarter of 2006, a more than nine-year low. Historical U.S. foreclosure activity by quarter. "Despite a seasonal bump higher in March, foreclosure activity in most markets continues to trend lower and back toward more healthy, stable levels," said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president at RealtyTrac. "More than one-third of the 216 local markets we analyzed were below their pre-recession foreclosure activity averages in the first quarter, and we would expect a growing number of markets to move below that milestone the rest of this year -- while the number of markets with a lingering low-grade fever of foreclosure activity continues to shrink." Markets below pre-recession levels in Q1 2016 Nationwide, the 289,116 properties with foreclosure filings in the first quarter was still 4 percent higher than the pre-recession quarterly average of 278,912 properties with foreclosure filings from Q1 2006 through Q3 2007. Among 216 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000, a total of 78 (36 percent) posted Q1 2016 foreclosure activity below pre-recession average levels, including Los Angeles (27 percent below pre-recession average); Dallas (65 percent below pre-recession average); Houston (64 percent below pre-recession average); Miami (19 percent below pre-recession average); and Atlanta (57 percent below pre-recession average). Interactive heat map of which markets were below and above pre-recession levels in Q1 2016. Markets above pre-recession levels in Q1 2016 There were still 138 of the 216 major metro areas (64 percent) with Q1 2016 foreclosure activity above pre-recession average levels, including New York (80 percent above pre-recession average); Chicago (17 percent above pre-recession average); Philadelphia (97 percent above pre-recession average); Washington, D.C. metro (134 percent above pre-recession average); and Boston (46 percent above pre-recession average). 97 percent of markets below peak foreclosure activity levels in Q1 2016 Nationwide, the 289,116 properties with foreclosure filings in the first quarter of 2016 was 69 percent below the quarterly peak of 937,840 properties with foreclosure filings in the second quarter of 2009. Among the 216 major metro areas analyzed for the report, 210 (97 percent) were below peak foreclosure activity levels in the first quarter of 2016. Markets furthest below the previous peak were Merced, California (95 percent below peak), followed by six markets all with Q1 2016 foreclosure activity 93 percent below peak levels: Boulder, Colorado; Fayetteville, Arkansas; Cape Coral-Fort Myers, Florida; Stockton, California; Denver, Colorado; and Phoenix, Arizona. "The Seattle housing market has benefitted from a robust economy, which when combined with the growth of home prices, has led to a slowdown in foreclosure activity," said Matthew Gardner, chief economist at Windermere Real Estate, covering the Seattle market, where Q1 2016 foreclosure activity was down 14 percent year-over-year and down 74 percent from the peak in Q3 2010. "Given the stringent process to qualify for a mortgage, as well as the greater down payment requirements, there is very little risk of an increase in foreclosure activity in the near term." 3 percent of markets reach new foreclosure activity peak in Q1 2016 Among the 216 metro areas analyzed for the report, six (3 percent) reached new foreclosure activity peak levels in the first quarter of 2016: Syracuse, New York; Kingsport, Tennessee; Utica-Rome, New York; Binghamton, New York; College Station, Texas; and Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Maryland, New Jersey, Nevada post highest state foreclosure rates in Q1 2016 One in every 459 U.S. housing units had a foreclosure filing in the first quarter of 2016. States with the top five highest foreclosure rates were Maryland (one in every 194 housing units with a foreclosure filing); New Jersey (one in every 216 housing units); Nevada (one in every 236 housing units); Delaware (one in every 240 housing units); and Florida (one in every 274 housing units. Other states posting top 10 foreclosure rates in the first quarter of 2016 were Illinois, Ohio, South Carolina, Indiana, and Pennsylvania. Atlantic City, Trenton, Baltimore post highest metro foreclosure rates in Q1 2016 Among the 216 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000, those with the five highest foreclosure rates in the first quarter of 2016 were Atlantic City, New Jersey (one in every 106 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Trenton, New Jersey (one in every 168 housing units); Baltimore, Maryland (one in every 183 housing units); Lakeland-Winter Haven, Florida (one in every 196 housing units); and Rockford, Illinois (one in every 211 housing units). Other metro areas posting top 10 foreclosure rates in the first quarter of 2016 were Las Vegas, Tampa, Fayetteville, North Carolina, Philadelphia, and Jacksonville, Florida. 48 percent of markets post annual increase in foreclosure activity in Q1 2016 Despite the nationwide decrease in foreclosure activity in the first quarter, 103 of the 216 metro areas analyzed in the report (48 percent) posted a year-over-year increase in foreclosure activity. Among the nation's 20 largest metro areas, those with the biggest annual increase in foreclosure activity were Boston (up 49 percent); Philadelphia (up 18 percent); Phoenix (up 10 percent); Baltimore (up 9 percent); and New York (up 7 percent). March foreclosure activity up month-over-month, still down from year ago There were a total of 108,970 U.S. properties with foreclosure filings in March, an 11 percent increase from February to the highest monthly level since October 2015 -- but still down 11 percent from a year ago. March foreclosure starts increase from a year ago in 20 states The monthly increase in March was driven by a jump in pre-foreclosure notices: foreclosure starts and scheduled foreclosure auctions. Foreclosure starts -- the first public notice starting the foreclosure process -- increased 21 percent from the previous month but were still down 11 percent from a year ago. March foreclosure starts increased from a year ago in 20 states, including Connecticut (up 169 percent), Arizona (up 125 percent), Delaware (up 78 percent), Iowa (up 64 percent), and Massachusetts (up 51 percent). "While overall foreclosures closed across Ohio remain on the decline, showing positive housing and job growth in the state, there was a modest increase in foreclosure starts during first quarter of 2016 that could likely relate to many homeowners not recognizing the increased value and appreciation they have earned in many communities across Ohio," said Michael Mahon, president at HER Realtors, covering the Cincinnati, Dayton and Columbus markets in Ohio, where foreclosure starts increased 18 percent year-over-year statewide in March. "If a homeowner finds themselves falling behind in mortgage payments due to health, divorce, or job loss, consulting a Realtor should be their first discussion in learning options available to assist them in potentially avoiding a foreclosure action." Historical U.S. foreclosure starts by month. March scheduled foreclosure auctions increase from a year ago in 23 states Scheduled foreclosure auctions -- which in some states act as the foreclosure start -- increased 25 percent month-over-month nationwide, but were still down 15 percent from a year ago. Scheduled foreclosure auctions increased 18 percent month-over-month in non-judicial foreclosure states and increased 17 percent in judicial states. March scheduled foreclosure auctions increased from a year ago in 23 states, including Massachusetts (up 211 percent), New York (up 92 percent), Pennsylvania (up 49 percent), Maryland (up 43 percent), and South Carolina (up 37 percent). "Over the last 10 years, U.S. foreclosure activity on average has increased 6 percent from February to March, and the 11 percent increase this year was not far off that typical seasonal bump," noted Blomquist. "February is of course a shorter month, and banks often ramp up foreclosure filings in March to take advantage of the spring selling season -- which should prove particularly favorable to banks this year given low inventory levels of homes for sale and continued strong demand from buyers regaining confidence in the housing market." Average time to foreclose decreases for second consecutive quarter Properties foreclosed on during the first quarter of 2016 were in the foreclosure process an average of 625 days, down 1 percent from 629 days in the previous quarter, but still up 1 percent from 620 days in the first quarter of 2015. The 1 percent quarter-over-quarter decline in the average time to foreclose in Q1 2016 was the second consecutive quarterly decline nationwide. There were six states with an average time to foreclose of more than 1,000 days in the first quarter of 2016: New Jersey (1,234); Hawaii (1,110); New York (1,061); Utah (1,059); Florida (1,018); and Connecticut (1,007). States with the shortest average time to foreclose in the first quarter of 2016 were Virginia (195 days); Mississippi (261 days); Wyoming (268 days); Tennessee (269 days); and Texas (272 days). U.S. average time to foreclose by quarter. Report methodology The RealtyTrac U.S. Foreclosure Market Report provides a count of the total number of properties with at least one foreclosure filing entered into the RealtyTrac database during the month -- broken out by type of filing. Some foreclosure filings entered into the database during the month may have been recorded in previous months. Data is collected from more than 2,500 counties nationwide using a combination of public record and proprietary sources, and those counties account for more than 90 percent of the U.S. population. RealtyTrac's report incorporates documents filed in all three phases of foreclosure: Default -- Notice of Default (NOD) and Lis Pendens (LIS); Auction -- Notice of Trustee's Sale and Notice of Foreclosure Sale (NTS and NFS); and Real Estate Owned, or REO properties (that have been foreclosed on and repurchased by a bank). The report does not count a property again if it receives the same type of foreclosure filing multiple times within the estimated foreclosure timeframe for the state where the property is located. About RealtyTrac RealtyTrac is a leading provider of comprehensive U.S. housing and property data, including nationwide parcel-level records for more than 130 million U.S. properties. Detailed data attributes include property characteristics, tax assessor data, sales and mortgage deed records, distressed data, including default, foreclosure and auctions status, and Automated Valuation Models (AVMs). Sourced from RealtyTrac subsidiaryHomefacts.com, the company's proprietary national neighborhood-level database includes more than 50 key local and neighborhood level dynamics for residential properties, providing unrivaled pre-diligence capabilities and a parcel risk database for portfolio analysis. RealtyTrac's data is widely viewed as the industry standard and, as such, is relied upon by real estate professionals and service providers, marketers and financial institutions, as well as the Federal Reserve, U.S. Treasury Department, HUD, state housing and banking departments, investment funds and tens of millions of consumers. In January 2016, RealtyTrac announced the beta launch of its new consumer focused, mobile first, property report website, HomeDisclosure.com, which provides real estate consumers and professionals alike, detailed pre-diligence data for nearly 120 million U.S. homes.
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CoreLogic Reports 34,000 Completed Foreclosures in February 2016
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January Mortgage Data: Delinquencies Up Sharply; Prepayment Rate Drops
JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Feb. 22, 2016 -- The Data & Analytics division of Black Knight Financial Services, Inc. reports the following "first look" at January 2016 month-end mortgage performance statistics derived from its loan-level database representing the majority of the national mortgage market. Total U.S. loan delinquency rate (loans 30 or more days past due, but not in foreclosure): 5.09% Month-over-month change: 6.62% Year-over-year change: -7.10% Total U.S. foreclosure pre-sale inventory rate: 1.30% Month-over-month change: -4.53% Year-over-year change: -25.69% Total U.S. foreclosure starts: 71,900 Month-over-month change: -7.94% Year-over-year change: -22.94% Monthly Prepayment Rate (SMM): 0.81% Month-over-month change: -28.67% Year-over-year change: -7.88% Foreclosure Sales as % of 90+: 2.17% Month-over-month change: 15.61% Year-over-year change: 24.76% Number of properties that are 30 or more days past due, but not in foreclosure: 2,575,000 Month-over-month change: 167,000 Year-over-year change: -189,000 Number of properties that are 90 or more days past due, but not in foreclosure: 831,000 Month-over-month change: 23,000 Year-over-year change: -229,000 Number of properties in foreclosure pre-sale inventory: 659,000 Month-over-month change: -30,000 Year-over-year change: -226,000 Number of properties that are 30 or more days past due or in foreclosure: 3,234,000 Month-over-month change: 137,000 Year-over-year change: -415,000 Top 5 States by Non-Current* Percentage Mississippi:        13.00% Louisiana:          10.49% New Jersey:       10.38% Alabama:             9.25% West Virginia:      9.19% Bottom 5 States by Non-Current* Percentage South Dakota:    3.50% Minnesota:         3.29% Alaska:              3.24% Colorado:           3.03% North Dakota:     2.41% Top 5 States by 90+ Days Delinquent Percentage Mississippi:        4.11% Louisiana:          2.95% Alabama:           2.86% Maine:               2.55% Tennessee:        2.42% Top 5 States by 6-Month Improvement in Non-Current* Percentage Oregon:             -4.73% Washington       -4.42% Nevada:             -3.57% Florida:              -3.51% Hawaii:              -2.01% Top 5 States by 6-Month Deterioration in Non-Current* Percentage North Dakota:    14.54% West Virginia:    11.71% Arizona:              9.74% Virginia:              9.57% California:            9.42% *Non-current totals combine foreclosures and delinquencies as a percent of active loans in that state. Notes: Totals are extrapolated based on Black Knight Financial Services' loan-level database of mortgage assets. All whole numbers are rounded to the nearest thousand. For a more detailed view of this month's "first look" data, please visit the Black Knight newsroom. The company will provide a more in-depth review of this data in its monthly Mortgage Monitor report, which includes an analysis of data supplemented by detailed charts and graphs that reflect trend and point-in-time observations. The Mortgage Monitor report will be available online at http://www.bkfs.com/CorporateInformation/NewsRoom/Pages/Mortgage-Monitor.aspx by March 7, 2016. About Black Knight Financial Services, Inc. Black Knight Financial Services, Inc. (NYSE: BKFS), a Fidelity National Financial (NYSE: FNF) company, is a leading provider of integrated technology, data and analytics solutions that facilitate and automate many of the business processes across the mortgage lifecycle. Black Knight Financial Services is committed to being a premier business partner that lenders and servicers rely on to achieve their strategic goals, realize greater success and better serve their customers by delivering best-in-class technology, services and insight with a relentless commitment to excellence, innovation, integrity and leadership. For more information on Black Knight Financial Services, please visit www.bkfs.com.
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CoreLogic Reports 32,000 Completed Foreclosures in December 2015
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Black Knight Financial Services' First Look at November Mortgage Data: Foreclosure Starts Hit Nine-Year Low; Fewer than 700,000 Active Foreclosures Remain
JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Dec. 23, 2015 -- The Data & Analytics division of Black Knight Financial Services, Inc. reports the following "first look" at November 2015 month-end mortgage performance statistics derived from its loan-level database representing the majority of the national mortgage market. Total U.S. loan delinquency rate (loans 30 or more days past due, but not in foreclosure): 4.92% Month-over-month change: 3.18% Year-over-year change: -18.26% Total U.S. foreclosure pre-sale inventory rate: 1.38% Month-over-month change: -3.24% Year-over-year change: -21.24% Total U.S. foreclosure starts: 66,600 Month-over-month change: -9.02% Year-over-year change: -9.76% Monthly Prepayment Rate (SMM): 0.92% Month-over-month change: -15.70% Year-over-year change: 0.39% Foreclosure Sales as % of 90+: 1.77% Month-over-month change: -12.86% Year-over-year change: 25.48% Number of properties that are 30 or more days past due, but not in foreclosure: 2,491,000 Month-over-month change: 76,000 Year-over-year change: -546,000 Number of properties that are 90 or more days past due, but not in foreclosure: 827,000 Month-over-month change: 7,000 Year-over-year change: -293,000 Number of properties in foreclosure pre-sale inventory: 698,000 Month-over-month change: -23,000 Year-over-year change: -185,000 Number of properties that are 30 or more days past due or in foreclosure: 3,189,000 Month-over-month change: 53,000 Year-over-year change: -732,000 Top 5 States by Non-Current* Percentage Mississippi: 12.57% New Jersey: 10.47% Louisiana: 10.03% New York: 9.03% Maine: 8.96% Bottom 5 States by Non-Current* Percentage South Dakota: 3.37% Minnesota: 3.23% Colorado: 3.03% Alaska: 2.93% North Dakota: 2.21% Top 5 States by 90+ Days Delinquent Percentage Mississippi: 4.11% Louisiana: 2.93% Alabama: 2.85% Rhode Island: 2.48% Maine: 2.47% Top 5 States by 6-Month Improvement in Non-Current* Percentage Alaska: -15.66% Oregon: -10.20% New Hampshire: -7.67% Florida: -7.60% Nebraska: -6.81% Top 5 States by 6-Month Deterioration in Non-Current* Percentage Texas: 3.43% California: 3.02% Arizona: 2.64% Wyoming: 2.55% Oklahoma: 2.45% *Non-current totals combine foreclosures and delinquencies as a percent of active loans in that state. Notes: Totals are extrapolated based on Black Knight Financial Services' loan-level database of mortgage assets. All whole numbers are rounded to the nearest thousand, except foreclosure starts, which are rounded to the nearest hundred. For a more detailed view of this month's "first look" data, please visit the Black Knight newsroom at http://www.bkfs.com/CorporateInformation/NewsRoom/Pages/20151223.aspx The company will provide a more in-depth review of this data in its monthly Mortgage Monitor report, which includes an analysis of data supplemented by detailed charts and graphs that reflect trend and point-in-time observations. The Mortgage Monitor report will be available online by Jan. 11, 2016. About Black Knight Financial Services, Inc. Black Knight Financial Services, Inc. (NYSE: BKFS), a Fidelity National Financial (NYSE:FNF) company, is a leading provider of integrated technology, data and analytics solutions that facilitate and automate many of the business processes across the mortgage lifecycle. Black Knight Financial Services is committed to being a premier business partner that lenders and servicers rely on to achieve their strategic goals, realize greater success and better serve their customers by delivering best-in-class technology, services and insight with a relentless commitment to excellence, innovation, integrity and leadership. For more information on Black Knight Financial Services, please visit www.bkfs.com.
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CoreLogic Reports 37,000 Completed Foreclosures in October 2015
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U.S. Foreclosure Starts at Lowest Level in More Than 10 Years According to RealtyTrac November Foreclosure Report
IRVINE, CA (December 10, 2015) - RealtyTrac® (www.realtytrac.com), the nation's leading source for comprehensive housing data, today released its U.S. Foreclosure Market Report™ for November 2015, which shows foreclosure filings — default notices, scheduled auctions and bank repossessions — were reported on 104,111 U.S. properties in November, a decrease of nearly 10 percent from the previous month and down more than 7 percent from a year ago. The report also shows one in every 1,268 U.S. housing units with a foreclosure filing during the month. The 10 percent monthly decrease in overall foreclosure activity was caused largely by a 15 percent monthly drop in foreclosure starts, with 41,208 properties starting the foreclosure process for the first time in November, the lowest monthly total since May 2005. Foreclosure starts have decreased on a monthly basis for seven of the last eight months -- with the exception of a monthly increase in October -- and November was the fifth consecutive month where national foreclosure starts decreased on a year-over-year basis. "Banks are continuing to work through the backlog of lingering foreclosures, pushing bank repossession numbers higher in the short term even as foreclosure starts drop to new lows," said Daren Blomquist. "This also means the share of active foreclosures tied to bubble-era loans is shrinking, with 59 percent of all loans in foreclosure originated between 2004 and 2008. While that is still a disproportionate share of active foreclosures, it continues to decrease from 61 percent earlier this year and 75 percent two years ago." Bucking the national trend, there were nine states where foreclosure starts increased from a year ago, including Oklahoma (up 246 percent), Arkansas (up 180 percent), Virginia (up 39 percent), Maine (up 5 percent), and Massachusetts (up 14 percent). Bank repossessions up 35 percent year-to-date There were a total of 40,329 properties repossessed by lenders (REOs) in November, up 10 percent from the previous month and up 60 percent from a year ago -- the ninth consecutive month with a year-over-year increase in REOs. Through the first 11 months of 2015 there have been 410,249 completed foreclosures, up 35 percent from 303,064 REOs during the same time period in 2014. REOs increased from a year ago in 41 states, led by Tennessee (up 608 percent), Mississippi (up 341 percent), Texas (298 percent), Nebraska (up 295 percent), New York (up 270 percent) and New Jersey (up 205 percent). Those states that saw the most completed foreclosures for the month included Florida (6,435 REOs), Texas (3,107 REOs), California (2,567 REOs), Illinois (2,338 REOs), and Georgia (2,302 REOs). Scheduled foreclosure auctions at lowest level since December 2005 A total of 36,409 U.S. properties were scheduled for foreclosure auction during the month, down 22 percent from the previous month and down 27 percent from a year ago. Scheduled foreclosure auctions -- which can be foreclosure starts in some states -- decreased from a year ago in 31 states, including Hawaii (down 87 percent), Florida (down 58 percent), Georgia (down 48 percent), Texas (down 46 percent), Oregon (down 39 percent), Colorado (down 34 percent), and Washington (down 33 percent). "Seattle can best be described as a market in full recovery mode," said Matthew Gardner, chief economist at Windermere Real Estate, covering the Seattle market. "Sales are strong and prices continue to climb. As such, the drop in foreclosure activity is not a surprise and I certainly do not see it increasing any time soon. What we can expect is for foreclosures to continue falling as banks clear through their backlog of inventory." There were 10 states where scheduled foreclosure auctions increased annually, including New Jersey (up 82 percent), Maryland (up 6 percent), New York (up 3 percent), Massachusetts (up 39 percent), and New Mexico (up 109 percent). Maryland, New Jersey, Florida, Nevada and Illinois post highest state foreclosure rates A total of 4,631 Maryland properties had a foreclosure filing in November, down nearly 10 percent from the previous month, but still up 13 percent from a year ago -- making Maryland number one in the nation for foreclosures for the second month in a row. One in every 516 Maryland housing units had a foreclosure filing in November, more than twice the national average. Foreclosure starts increased 13 percent from a year ago after six consecutive months of year-over-year decreases. The state of New Jersey accounted for 6,448 properties receiving a foreclosure filing in November, a foreclosure rate of one in every 553 housing units -- second highest among the states. New Jersey foreclosure activity in November decreased 15 percent from the previous month, and was down 13 percent from a year ago -- the first annual decrease after eight consecutive months of increases. One in every 662 Florida housing units received a foreclosure filing in November, the nation's third highest state foreclosure rate. Florida's foreclosure rate has ranked in the Top 5 each month in 2015. Florida foreclosure activity decreased 13 percent from the previous month and was down 30 percent from a year ago. Florida foreclosure starts decreased annually by 36 percent, the fourth consecutive month of annual decreases. Scheduled foreclosure auctions in Florida decreased 58 percent from a year ago, the 12th consecutive month of decreases. Nevada foreclosure activity decreased 23 percent from the previous month, but increased 2 percent from a year ago, giving the state the nation's fourth highest state foreclosure rate: one in every 771 housing units with a foreclosure filing. Nevada foreclosure starts decreased 17 percent annually, the fifth consecutive month of decreases. Scheduled foreclosure auctions decreased 12 percent annually, the fourth consecutive month of decreases. Nevada bank repossessions increased 89 percent, the eighth consecutive month of increases. After two consecutive months of annual increases, Illinois foreclosure activity decreased 21 percent from the previous month in November, and the state posted the nation's fifth highest foreclosure rate: one in every 859 housing units with a foreclosure filing. Other states with foreclosure rates among the nation's 10 highest in November were South Carolina at No. 6 (one in every 873 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Ohio at No. 7 (one in every 1,014 housing units); Georgia at No. 8 (one in every 1,083 housing units); Indiana at No. 9 (one in every 1,089 housing units); and North Carolina at No. 10 (one in every 1,139 housing units). Atlantic City posts top metro foreclosure rate for fifth consecutive month The Atlantic City, New Jersey metro area remained in the No. 1 spot among metropolitan statistical areas with a population of 200,000 or more for the fifth consecutive month in November. One in every 307 Atlantic City housing units had a foreclosure filing in November, more than four times the national average. Atlantic City maintained the top spot even though overall activity was down 16 percent from the previous month and down 6 percent from a year ago. Bank repossessions in Atlantic City increased for the ninth consecutive month. Foreclosure activity in November increased 32 percent from a year ago in Trenton, New Jersey, and the metro area posted the nation's second highest foreclosure rate: one in every 346 housing units with a foreclosure filing. Scheduled foreclosure auctions increased annually in Trenton for the seventh consecutive month, and bank repossessions increased annually for the 10th consecutive month. Foreclosure activity increased 9 percent from a year ago in Ocala, Florida, and the metro area posted the nation's third highest metro foreclosure rate: one in every 449 housing units with a foreclosure filing. Other metro areas with foreclosure rates in the top 10 highest were Baltimore, Maryland at No. 4 (one in every 482 housing units with a foreclosure filing), Reading, Pennsylvania at No. 5 (one in every 502), Tampa, Florida at No. 6 (one in every 512), Columbia, South Carolina at No. 7 (one in every 523), Fayetteville, North Carolina at No. 8 (one in every 536), Jacksonville, Florida at No. 9 (one in every 552), and Daytona Beach, Florida at No. 10 (one in every 567). Report methodology The RealtyTrac U.S. Foreclosure Market Report provides a count of the total number of properties with at least one foreclosure filing entered into the RealtyTrac database during the month -- broken out by type of filing. Some foreclosure filings entered into the database during the month may have been recorded in previous months. Data is collected from more than 2,200 counties nationwide, and those counties account for more than 90 percent of the U.S. population. RealtyTrac's report incorporates documents filed in all three phases of foreclosure: Default — Notice of Default (NOD) and Lis Pendens (LIS); Auction — Notice of Trustee's Sale and Notice of Foreclosure Sale (NTS and NFS); and Real Estate Owned, or REO properties (that have been foreclosed on and repurchased by a bank). The report does not count a property again if it receives the same type of foreclosure filing multiple times within the estimated foreclosure timeframe for the state where the property is located. Report License The RealtyTrac U.S. Foreclosure Market Report is the result of a proprietary evaluation of information compiled by RealtyTrac; the report and any of the information in whole or in part can only be quoted, copied, published, re-published, distributed and/or re-distributed or used in any manner if the user specifically references RealtyTrac as the source for said report and/or any of the information set forth within the report. Data Licensing and Custom Report Order Investors, businesses and government institutions can contact RealtyTrac to license bulk foreclosure and neighborhood data or purchase customized reports. For more information please contact our Data Licensing Department at 800.462.5193 or [email protected]. About RealtyTrac RealtyTrac is a leading supplier of U.S. real estate data, with nationwide parcel-level records for more than 129 million U.S. parcels that include property characteristics, tax assessor data, sales and mortgage deed records, Automated Valuation Models (AVMs) and 20 million active and historical default, foreclosure auction and bank-owned properties. RealtyTrac's housing data and foreclosure reports are relied on by the Federal Reserve, U.S. Treasury Department, HUD, numerous state housing and banking departments, investment funds as well as millions of real estate professionals and consumers, to help evaluate housing trends and make informed decisions about real estate.
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity Increases 7 Percent in July as Bank Repossessions Reach 30-Month High
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Rise in Bank Repossessions Fuels 1 Percent Increase in Foreclosure Activity to 19-Month High in May
IRVINE, CA--(June 18, 2015) - RealtyTrac®, the nation's leading source for comprehensive housing data, today released its May 2015 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report™, which shows foreclosure filings -- default notices, scheduled auctions and bank repossessions -- were reported on 126,868 U.S. properties in May 2015, up 1 percent from the previous month and up 16 percent from a year ago to a 19-month high. The U.S. foreclosure rate in May was one in every 1,041 housing units with a foreclosure filing. The increase in May was driven primarily by a jump in bank repossessions (REOs), which at 44,892 were down 1 percent from the previous month but up 58 percent from a year ago, and a 5 percent year-over-year increase in scheduled foreclosure auctions. REOs increased on a year-over-year basis for the third consecutive month, and scheduled foreclosure auctions have increased on a year-over-year basis in four of the last eight months. May REOs were 56 percent below the peak of 102,134 REOs in September 2013 but still nearly twice the average monthly number of 23,119 in 2005 and 2006 before the housing bubble burst in August 2006. (Also see special methodology note on REO data collection below.) "May foreclosure numbers are a classic good news-bad news scenario, with the number of homeowners starting the foreclosure process stabilizing at pre-housing crisis levels but the number of homeowners actually losing their homes to foreclosure still well above pre-crisis levels and on the rise," said Daren Blomquist, vice president at RealtyTrac. "Lenders and courts are pushing through stubborn foreclosure cases that have been languishing in foreclosure limbo for years as options to prevent foreclosure are exhausted or left untapped." 38 states post annual increase in REOs Following the national trend, 38 states and the District of Columbia posted year-over-year increases in REOs, including New Jersey (up 197 percent), New York (up 116 percent), Ohio (up 114 percent), Georgia (up 108 percent), Pennsylvania (up 106 percent), Florida (up 63 percent), Michigan (up 63 percent), Maryland (up 62 percent), and California (up 31 percent). "Even though national foreclosures increased a tad and REOs in California jumped we saw an expected settling in the Los Angeles metro numbers," said Mark Hughes, chief operating officer with First Team Real Estate, covering the Southern California market. "As we settle back into more stable markets we will see some areas up and some down in foreclosure starts but overall we are settling back towards pre-boom distress percentages as a part of the overall market. There's still more inventory to clean up but all indicators are these are the final and in some cases the toughest distressed properties to move through the system. A drop in distressed inventory adds even more upward pressure on pricing as inventory still lags behind good buyer interest across the region." "As available housing inventory begins to increase, we are noticing slight increases in foreclosure activity across Ohio -- particularly, in Columbus for homes priced under $200,000, which appears to be driven by Home Equity Lines of Credit maturity loans, as well as an aging population of homeowners not understanding opportunities available to them from increased area prices," said Michael Mahon, president at HER Realtors, covering the Cincinnati, Dayton and Columbus markets in Ohio. "As income has not kept up with growing medical costs and credit expenses, many of these same homeowners are now in negative cash flow and equity situations. These homeowners should reach out to a neighborhood real estate or mortgage professional immediately to find out what options are available to them." Foreclosure starts up annually for the first time in four months A total of 51,414 U.S. properties started the foreclosure process for the first time in May 2015, down 1 percent from the previous month but up 4 percent from a year ago after four consecutive months of year-over-year decreases. Despite the increase, U.S. foreclosure starts are still below pre-crisis levels from 2005 and 2006 when they averaged 52,279 a month before the housing price bubble burst in August 2006. Twenty-five states posted year-over-year increases in foreclosure starts, including New Jersey (up 73 percent), Virginia (up 39 percent), Missouri (up 19 percent), Massachusetts (up 14 percent), and Washington (up 11 percent). Scheduled foreclosure auctions are 40 percent higher than pre-crisis levels A total of 49,413 properties in May were scheduled for a future foreclosure auction (scheduled foreclosure auctions are foreclosure starts in some states), up 6 percent from the previous month and up 5 percent from a year ago. U.S. scheduled foreclosure auctions so far this year are running about 40 percent higher than their pre-crisis levels from 2005 and 2006. Twenty-six states posted increases in scheduled foreclosure auctions from a year ago, including New York (up 118 percent), Illinois (up 23 percent), New Jersey (up 22 percent), and Maryland (up 11 percent). Florida posts the nation's highest foreclosure rate for the third consecutive month Driven by a 63 percent annual increase in REOs, overall foreclosure activity in Florida increased 4 percent from the previous month and was up 7 percent from a year ago in May, and the state's foreclosure rate ranked No. 1 for the month with one in every 409 housing units with a foreclosure filing. Other states with foreclosure rates among the top 10 highest nationwide included New Jersey (one in every 483 housing units with a foreclosure filing), Maryland (one in every 531 housing units), Nevada (one in every 590 housing units), Ohio (one in every 763 housing units), Illinois (one in every 765 housing units), Indiana (one in every 963 housing units), and South Carolina (one in every 987 housing units). 13 out of the 20 largest metros posted annual increases in foreclosure activity Among the nation's 20 largest metropolitan statistical areas, 13 posted an annual increase in foreclosure activity in May, including Dallas (up 64 percent), St. Louis (up 56 percent), Baltimore (up 35 percent), New York (up 34 percent), Philadelphia (up 28 percent), Atlanta (up 27 percent), Detroit (up 27 percent), San Francisco (up 25 percent), Houston (up 18 percent), Miami (up 17 percent), and Seattle (up 10 percent from a year ago). "The increase in foreclosure activity in the Seattle area doesn't concern me at this time," said Matthew Gardner, Chief Economist Windermere Real Estate, covering the Seattlemarket. "Given the growth in home values in our region, I believe that it's fairly safe to assume that this increase is primarily a function of banks starting foreclosure proceedings after having delayed taking action for some time. I would not be surprised to see the annual rate continue to remain elevated for a while as we get through the pipeline." Atlantic City posts highest foreclosure rate among metro areas Of metro areas with a population of over 200,000, those with the highest foreclosure rates were Atlantic City, New Jersey (one in every 230 housing units with a foreclosure filing), Lakeland, Florida (one in every 331 housing units), Ocala, Florida (one in every 335 housing units), Miami, Florida (one in every 347 housing units) and Jacksonville, Florida (one in every 348 housing units). "The last REO remnants from the great recession continue to work their way through our judicial system," said Mike Pappas, CEO and president of the Keyes Company, covering the South Florida market. "The past decade has been a real estate roller coaster ride but we are seeing a balance and steadiness in this current market." Special methodology note on REOs In the first quarter of 2015, RealtyTrac started receiving REO data from a new source that provides the data more quickly in some cases than other sources. This new source may be resulting in some REOs reported by RealtyTrac in May that would have been reported in subsequent months using other sources. As always, if RealtyTrac receives an REO filing (or any other foreclosure filing type) on the same property from multiple sources, or from the same source multiple times, that REO filing is only counted in the RealtyTrac U.S. Foreclosure Market Report the first time it is received. Report methodology The RealtyTrac U.S. Foreclosure Market Report provides a count of the total number of properties with at least one foreclosure filing entered into the RealtyTrac database during the month -- broken out by type of filing. Some foreclosure filings entered into the database during the month may have been recorded in previous months. Data is collected from more than 2,500 counties nationwide using a combination of public record and proprietary sources, and those counties account for more than 90 percent of the U.S. population. RealtyTrac's report incorporates documents filed in all three phases of foreclosure: Default - Notice of Default (NOD) and Lis Pendens (LIS); Auction - Notice of Trustee's Sale and Notice of Foreclosure Sale (NTS and NFS); and Real Estate Owned, or REO properties (that have been foreclosed on and repurchased by a bank). The report does not count a property again if it receives the same type of foreclosure filing multiple times within the estimated foreclosure timeframe for the state where the property is located. About RealtyTrac RealtyTrac is a leading provider of comprehensive U.S. housing and property data, including nationwide parcel-level records for more than 130 million U.S. properties. Detailed data attributes include property characteristics, tax assessor data, sales and mortgage deed records, distressed data, including default, foreclosure and auctions status, and Automated Valuation Models (AVMs). Sourced from RealtyTrac subsidiary Homefacts.com, the company's proprietary national neighborhood-level database includes more than 50 key local and neighborhood level dynamics for residential properties, providing unrivaled pre-diligence capabilities and a parcel risk database for portfolio analysis. RealtyTrac's data is widely viewed as the industry standard and, as such, is relied upon by real estate professionals and service providers, marketers and financial institutions, as well as the Federal Reserve, U.S. Treasury Department, HUD, state housing and banking departments, investment funds and tens of millions of consumers.
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Homeowner-Vacated "Zombie" Foreclosures Nationwide Down 10 Percent From a Year Ago in Q2 2015
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity Increases 3 Percent in April to 18-Month High Driven by Rising Bank Repossessions
IRVINE, Calif. – May 21, 2015 — RealtyTrac®, the nation's leading source for comprehensive housing data, today released its April 2015 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report™, which shows foreclosure filings — default notices, scheduled auctions and bank repossessions — were reported on 125,875U.S. properties in April of 2015, up 3 percent from the previous month and up 9 percent from a year ago, an 18-month high. The U.S. foreclosure rate in April was one in every 1,049 housing units with a foreclosure filing. The increase in April was driven primarily by a jump in bank repossessions (REOs), which at 45,168 were up 25 percent from the previous month and up 50 percent from a year ago to a 27-month high. REOs increased on a year-over-year basis for the second consecutive month. The spike in April REOs is still 56 percent below the peak of 102,134 REOs in September 2013. (Also see special methodology note on REO data collection below.) "The REO increase in April was foreshadowed by a 23-month high in scheduled foreclosure auctions in October 2014," said Daren Blomquist, vice president at RealtyTrac. "Many of those scheduled auctions are now taking place, and properties are going back to the foreclosing lender. Meanwhile we continue to see foreclosure starts decrease, and foreclosure starts nationwide are now running consistently below pre-crisis levels — indicating that the overall increase in foreclosure activity in April is a continuation of the clean-up phase of the last housing crisis, not the start of a new crisis. "While distressed sales typically have a stifling effect on the housing market, in this particular market an influx of distressed inventory could actually help stimulate sales during the spring and summer buying season as new listings become available, often in the middle to lower ranges of the market," Blomquist added. "Banks are liquidating these distressed properties in a seller's market with a low supply of inventory for sale, which should help them sell quickly and at a price that is relatively close to full market value." REOs sold for 87 percent of estimated market value in first quarter The average sale price of REOs sold in the first quarter was 87 percent of the average estimated market value of those same properties at the time of sale. In some markets REOs sold at a much higher price-to-value ratio, including San Diego, California (100 percent), Charlotte, North Carolina (100 percent), San Francisco, California (97 percent), Bakersfield, Carolina (97 percent) and Portland, Oregon (97 percent). "We've seen distressed inventory work its way through the auction and REO process at a varying pace depending on local market conditions and price points," said Mark Hughes, chief operating officer with First Team Real Estate, covering the Southern California market. "The uptick in April is a natural part of that flow toward equilibrium and a more stable market." Markets where REOs sold for the lowest price-to-value ratio in the first quarter were East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania (62 percent), Akron, Ohio (66 percent), Atlanta (70 percent), Cleveland (70 percent), and Baltimore (74 percent). "While overall foreclosure activity remains lower across Ohio, concerns in a number of communities remain focused on lack of job growth as a potential indicator of increased foreclosure activity for the future," said Michael Mahon, president at HER Realtors, covering the Cincinnati, Dayton and Columbus markets in Ohio. "Areas such as Dayton and Cleveland, that have documented lower than expected job growth numbers for 2015, have maintained a notable increase in REO activity worth monitoring and consideration for potential future trends." REOs sold in first quarter an average of 243 days after bank repossession REO properties that sold in the first quarter sold an average of 243 days after being repossessed via foreclosure, down from an average of 300 days for REOs sold in the fourth quarter of 2014 but up from an average of 226 days for REOs sold in the first quarter of 2014. 33 states post annual increase in REOs Following the national trend, 33 states posted a year-over-year increase in REOs, including Florida (up 42 percent), California (up 53 percent), Michigan (up 198 percent), Illinois (up 46 percent), and Ohio (up 63 percent). Foreclosure starts down for the fourth consecutive month A total of 51,773 U.S. properties started the foreclosure process for the first time in April 2015, down 3 percent from the previous month and down 5 percent from a year ago — the fourth consecutive month with a year-over-year increase in foreclosure starts nationwide.Despite the decrease nationwide, 18 states posted a year-over-year increase in foreclosure starts, including Massachusetts (up 91 percent), Nevada (up 64 percent), and New York (up 31 percent). Scheduled foreclosure auctions decrease 46,777 properties were scheduled for foreclosure auction in April (scheduled foreclosure auctions are foreclosure starts in some states) down 8 percent from the previous month and down 5 percent from a year ago. Despite the decrease nationwide, 21 states posted year-over-year increases in scheduled foreclosure auctions, including New York (up 82 percent), Massachusetts (up 33 percent), Nevada (up 31 percent) and New Jersey (up 22 percent). Florida posts highest state foreclosure rate Despite a 6 percent year-over-year decrease in foreclosure filings, Florida still had the highest state foreclosure rate in April: one in every 425 housing units with a foreclosure filing — nearly 2.5 times the national average. "We are in the final innings of this extra-inning distressed ball game," said Mike Pappas, CEO and president of the Keyes Company, covering the South Florida market. "As this tide recedes the strong economic tide is pushing us to historic sales for our region." Other states with foreclosure rates among the top four highest nationwide posted increases in foreclosure activity: Nevada at No. 2 with foreclosure activity up 39 percent year-over-year; Maryland at No. 3 with foreclosure activity up 5 percent year-over-year; and New Jersey at No. 4 with foreclosure activity up 18 percent year-over-year. Metros with the highest foreclosure rates Of metro areas with a population of over 200,000, those with the highest foreclosure rates were Atlantic City, New Jersey (one in every 297), Jacksonville, Florida (one in every 341), Tampa, Florida (one in every 372), Daytona-Deltona Beach-Ormond Beach, Florida (one in every 378) and Miami, Florida (one in every 386). Special methodology note on REOs In the first quarter of 2015, RealtyTrac started receiving REO data from a new source that provides the data more quickly in some cases than other sources. This new source may be resulting in some REOs reported by RealtyTrac in April that would have been reported in subsequent months using other sources. As always, if RealtyTrac receives an REO filing (or any other foreclosure filing type) on the same property from multiple sources, or from the same source multiple times, that REO filing is only counted in the RealtyTrac U.S. Foreclosure Market Report the first time it is received. Report methodology The RealtyTrac U.S. Foreclosure Market Report provides a count of the total number of properties with at least one foreclosure filing entered into the RealtyTrac database during the month — broken out by type of filing. Some foreclosure filings entered into the database during the month may have been recorded in previous months. Data is collected from more than 2,500 counties nationwide using a combination of public record and proprietary sources, and those counties account for more than 90 percent of the U.S. population. RealtyTrac's report incorporates documents filed in all three phases of foreclosure: Default — Notice of Default (NOD) and Lis Pendens (LIS); Auction — Notice of Trustee's Sale and Notice of Foreclosure Sale (NTS and NFS); and Real Estate Owned, or REO properties (that have been foreclosed on and repurchased by a bank). The report does not count a property again if it receives the same type of foreclosure filing multiple times within the estimated foreclosure timeframe for the state where the property is located. About RealtyTrac RealtyTrac is a leading provider of comprehensive U.S. housing and property data, including nationwide parcel-level records for more than 130 million U.S. properties. Detailed data attributes include property characteristics, tax assessor data, sales and mortgage deed records, distressed data, including default, foreclosure and auctions status, and Automated Valuation Models (AVMs). Sourced from RealtyTrac subsidiary Homefacts.com, the company's proprietary national neighborhood-level database includes more than 50 key local and neighborhood level dynamics for residential properties, providing unrivaled pre-diligence capabilities and a parcel risk database for portfolio analysis. RealtyTrac's data is widely viewed as the industry standard and, as such, is relied upon by real estate professionals and service providers, marketers and financial institutions, as well as the Federal Reserve, U.S. Treasury Department, HUD, state housing and banking departments, investment funds and tens of millions of consumers.
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Black Knight Financial Services' "First Look" at February Mortgage Data: Foreclosure Inventory Reaches Lowest Level Since 2007
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CoreLogic Reports January 2015 National Foreclosure Inventory Down 33.2 Percent Year Over Year
  March 10, 2015, Irvine, Calif. – CoreLogic®, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled services provider, today released its January 2015 National Foreclosure Report which shows that the foreclosure inventory declined 33.2 percent and completed foreclosures declined 22.5 percent from January 2014. The report also shows there were 43,000 completed foreclosures nationwide in January 2015, down from 55,000 in January 2014 and representing a decrease of 63 percent from the peak of completed foreclosures in September 2010. Completed foreclosures have declined every month for the past 37 consecutive months. On a month-over-month basis, completed foreclosures were up 14.7 percent from the 37,000* reported in December 2014. As a basis of comparison, before the decline in the housing market in 2007, completed foreclosures averaged 21,000 per month nationwide between 2000 and 2006. Completed foreclosures are an indication of the total number of homes actually lost to foreclosure. Since the financial crisis began in September 2008, there have been approximately 5.5 million completed foreclosures across the country, and since homeownership rates peaked in the second quarter of 2004, there have been approximately 7 million homes lost to foreclosure. As of January 2015 the national foreclosure inventory was down 33.2 percent year over year, and approximately 549,000 homes were in some stage of foreclosure. This compares to 822,000 homes in January 2014 and represents 39 consecutive months of year-over-year declines. The foreclosure inventory as of January 2015 made up 1.4 percent of all homes with a mortgage, compared to 2.0 percent in January 2014. On a month-over-month basis, the foreclosure inventory was down 2.7 percent from December 2014. The current foreclosure rate of 1.4 percent is back to March 2008 levels. "Job growth and home-value appreciation have worked to push the serious delinquency rate to the lowest since mid-2008 and foreclosures down by one-third from a year ago," said Frank Nothaft, chief economist at CoreLogic. "With economic growth in 2015 expected to be better than last year, further declines in both delinquencies and foreclosures are projected for this year." "The foreclosure inventory continues to shrink with declines in all 50 states over the past 12 months," said Anand Nallathambi, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "Florida, one of the hardest hit states during the foreclosure crisis, experienced a decline of almost 50 percent year over year which is outstanding news." Highlights as of January 2015: The number of mortgages in serious delinquency declined 23.8 percent from January 2014 to January 2015 with 1.5 million mortgages, or 4 percent, in serious delinquency (defined as 90 days or more past due, including those loans in foreclosure or REO). This was the lowest delinquency rate since June 2008. The foreclosure inventory has experienced 39 months of continuous declines and year-over-year double-digit declines for 28 consecutive months The five states with the highest number of completed foreclosures for the 12 months ending in January 2015 were: Florida (111,000), Michigan (51,000), Texas (34,000), California (30,000) and Georgia (28,000). These five states accounted for almost half of all completed foreclosures nationally. Four states and the District of Columbia experienced the lowest number of completed foreclosures for the 12 months ending in January 2015: South Dakota (22), the District of Columbia (66), North Dakota (336), West Virginia (511) and Wyoming (532). Four states and the District of Columbia experienced the highest foreclosure inventory as a percentage of all mortgaged homes: New Jersey (5.2 percent), New York (4.0 percent), Florida (3.5 percent), Hawaii (2.7 percent) and the District of Columbia (2.5 percent). The five states with the lowest foreclosure inventory as a percentage of all mortgaged homes were Alaska (0.3 percent), Nebraska (0.4 percent), North Dakota (0.4 percent), Arizona (0.5 percent) and Montana (0.5 percent). *December data was revised. Revisions are standard, and to ensure accuracy, CoreLogic incorporates newly released data to provide updated results. To download a copy of the National Foreclosure Report, please visit: CoreLogic Foreclosure Report January 2015 For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog: http://www.corelogic.com/blog. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled services provider. The company's combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 3.5 billion records spanning more than 40 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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21 Percent of U.S. Housing Markets Now Less Affordable Than Their Historical Averages According to New RealtyTrac Report Analyzing Early Warning Signs of Possible Home Price Bubbles
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity Increases 15 Percent in October Driven by 17-Month High in Scheduled Foreclosure Auctions
IRVINE, CA--(Nov 13, 2014) - RealtyTrac®, the nation's leading source for comprehensive housing data, today released its U.S. Foreclosure Market Report™ for October 2014, which shows foreclosure filings -- default notices, scheduled auctions and bank repossessions -- were reported on 123,109 U.S. properties in October, an increase of 15 percent from the previous month but still down 8 percent from a year ago. The 15 percent monthly increase was the largest month-over-month increase since U.S. foreclosure activity peaked in March 2010. The report also shows one in every 1,069 U.S. housing units with a foreclosure filing during the month. A total of 59,869 U.S. properties were scheduled for foreclosure auction during the month, up 24 percent from the previous month and up 7 percent from a year ago to the highest level since May 2013. Scheduled foreclosure auctions in judicial foreclosure states, where foreclosures are processed through the court system, increased 21 percent from the previous month and were up 3 percent from a year ago. Scheduled foreclosure auctions in non-judicial states increased 27 percent from the previous month and were up 14 percent from a year ago. "The October foreclosure numbers are not a complete surprise given that over the past three years there has been an average 8 percent monthly uptick in scheduled foreclosure auctions in October as banks try to get ahead of the usual holiday foreclosure moratoriums," said Daren Blomquist, vice president at RealtyTrac. "But the sheer magnitude of the increase this year demonstrates there is more than just a seasonal pattern at work. Distressed properties that have been in a holding pattern for years are finally being cleared for landing at the foreclosure auction. "There is still strong demand from the large institutional investors at the foreclosure auction in some markets, but even in markets with decreasing demand at the foreclosure auction, banks can be confident in selling REO properties quickly and at a good price," Blomquist continued. "That's because there is still strong demand from buyers, particularly in the lower price ranges, combined with a dearth of distressed homes listed for sale." Scheduled foreclosure auctions increased from a year ago in 29 states, including Oregon (up 399 percent), North Carolina (up 288 percent), New Jersey (up 118 percent), New York (up 89 percent), Connecticut (up 60 percent), Nevada (up 53 percent), Alabama (up 41 percent), Washington (up 36 percent), Indiana (up 36 percent), California (up 19 percent) and South Carolina (up 18 percent). Other high-level findings from the report: Lenders repossessed 27,914 U.S. properties via foreclosure (REO) in October, up 22 percent from the previous month but down 26 percent from a year ago. October posted the largest monthly increase in REOs since June 2009. REOs increased from a year ago in 16 states, including Maryland (up 190 percent), Pennsylvania (up 25 percent), New Jersey (up 22 percent), Oregon (up 20 percent) and New York (up 18 percent). Overall foreclosure activity increased from a year ago in 10 of the nation's 20 largest metropolitan statistical areas in terms of population, including Washington, D.C. (26 percent increase), Philadelphia (13 percent increase), Baltimore (13 percent increase), Riverside-San Bernardino in Southern California (8 percent increase), and New York (7 percent increase). Among the nation's 20 largest metros, those with the five highest foreclosure rates were Miami (one in every 363 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Tampa (one in every 395 housing units); Baltimore (one in every 435 housing units); Riverside-San Bernardino in Southern California (one in every 495 housing units); and Chicago (one in every 553 housing units). A total of 56,452 U.S. properties started the foreclosure process in October, up 12 percent from previous month but down 4 percent from a year ago. This was the largest monthly increase in U.S. foreclosure starts since August 2011. Local broker perspectives "The backlog of delayed foreclosures continues to make its way through the pipeline, with many homeowners letting their homes fall into foreclosure when the Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act of 2007 expired at the end of 2013," said Mike Pappas, CEO and President of the Keyes Company representing Southern Florida. "However, we are transitioning from a distressed market to a normal market. The 27 percent decline in the distressed numbers for South Florida confirms we are in the fourth quarter of the distressed game." "We saw a bump of foreclosure activity month over month in October," said Chris Pollinger, senior vice president of sales at First Team Real Estate, covering the Southern California market. "But as an overall percentage of the business, foreclosures continue to represent a very small minority of sales activity." "Three key legs have strengthened in the Denver real estate market -- conservative lending practices, increased market demand and price stabilization," said Greg Smith, owner/broker of RE/MAX Alliance, covering the Denver market. "Most homeowners are now in a place where they have enough equity in their homes to sell via a non-distressed channel. We should continue to see this trend through 2015." "While the overall market is moving full steam ahead, our newest concern is in the increasing number of reported deeds in lieu of foreclosure and sheriff sale transactions adding to the REO inventory held by lenders," said Michael Mahon, executive vice president and broker at HER Realtors, covering the Columbus, Cincinnati and Dayton, Ohio markets. "Much of this increase in foreclosure activity is attributed to the lack of incentive for mortgage servicers and consumers to attempt mutually beneficial foreclosure alternatives. Many servicers are acting in a much quicker manner when dealing with mortgage default situations in an attempt to minimize costs of maintaining distressed assets, as well as taking advantage of appreciating home values across Ohio. "With the November elections behind us, hopes of a stronger housing economy in 2015 are centered on the restoration of the short sale income forgiveness provision of the federal income tax code," Mahon continued, referring to the Mortgage Forgiveness Debt Relief Act. "This at a time when consumers are being provided no financial support from the federal government concerning income tax relief when entering into short sale solutions with servicers. These economic catalysts are being considered much of the root causes regarding recent month-over-month increases of foreclosure activity." Maryland, Florida, Nevada, Ohio and Illinois post highest state foreclosure rates A total of 5,943 Maryland properties had a foreclosure filing in October, a 68 percent jump from the previous month and up 30 percent from a year ago to the highest level since July 2010. This 51-month high in foreclosure activity gave Maryland the highest state foreclosure rate in the nation in October: one in every 400 housing units with a foreclosure filing. All three stages of foreclosure activity in Maryland increased from a year ago in October: foreclosure starts were up 4 percent, scheduled foreclosure auctions were up 12 percent, and bank repossessions (REOs) were up 190 percent. The Florida foreclosure rate (one in every 444 housing units with a foreclosure filing) ranked second highest among the states in October, down from a No. 1 ranking in the previous month. Florida foreclosure activity in October was down 2 percent from the previous month and down 25 percent from a year ago -- the 15th consecutive month with an annual decrease. One in every 596 Nevada housing units had a foreclosure filing in October, the nation's third highest state foreclosure rate. Nevada foreclosure activity increased 34 percent from the previous month but was still down 31 percent from a year ago. Ohio foreclosure activity jumped 51 percent from the previous month, giving Ohio the nation's fourth highest state foreclosure rate: one in every 674 housing units with a foreclosure filing. Despite the monthly increase, Ohio foreclosure activity was still down 22 percent from a year ago. Illinois foreclosure activity increased 11 percent from the previous month, and the state posted the nation's fifth highest foreclosure rate: one in every 712 housing units with a foreclosure filing. Despite the monthly increase, Illinois foreclosure activity was still down 22 percent from a year ago. Other states with foreclosure rates among the nation's 10 highest in October were Delaware at No. 6 (one in every 752 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Indiana at No. 7 (one in every 762 housing units); South Carolina at No. 8 (one in every 814 housing units); New Jersey at No. 9 (one in every 878 housing units); and Georgia at No. 10 (one in every 899 housing units). Florida, Maryland, California cities post highest metro foreclosure rates With one in every 363 housing units with a foreclosure filing in October, Miami, Fla., posted the highest foreclosure rate among metropolitan statistical areas with a population of 200,000 or more. Miami foreclosure activity in October increased 11 percent from previous month -- driven by a 67 percent monthly spike in foreclosure starts -- but was still down 27 percent from a year ago. Foreclosure activity in Orlando, Fla., decreased both annually (13 percent) and monthly (15 percent), but the metro area's foreclosure rate still ranked second highest nationwide. One in every 394 housing units in Orlando had a foreclosure filing in October, nearly three times the national average. Despite a 23 percent year-over-year decrease in foreclosure activity, Tampa, Fla., posted the nation's third highest metro foreclosure rate in October: one in every 395 housing units with a foreclosure filing. Foreclosure activity decreased 37 percent from a year ago in Jacksonville, Fla., but the city still posted the nation's fourth highest metro foreclosure rate (one in every 433 housing units with a foreclosure filing), and foreclosure activity increased 13 percent from a year ago in Baltimore, Md., giving that city the nation's fifth highest metro foreclosure rate (one in every 435 housing units with a foreclosure filing). The remaining five metro areas with foreclosure rates in the top 10 highest were Cape Coral-Fort Myers, Fla., at No. 6 (one in every 445 housing units); Hagerstown-Martinsburg, Md., at No. 7 (one in every 458 housing units); Lakeland, Fla., at No. 8 (one in every 460 housing units); Visalia, Calif., at No. 9 (one in every 474 housing units); and Pensacola, Fla., at No. 10 (one in every 481 housing units). Foreclosure activity decreased from a year ago in six of the markets with the top 10 highest foreclosure rates. However, there were large increases from a year ago of completed foreclosures in Baltimore (up 212 percent), Hagerstown-Martinsburg (up 178 percent), Visalia (up 60 percent and Orlando (up 23 percent). While scheduled foreclosure auctions increased dramatically from a year ago in Cape Coral-Fort Myers (up 170 percent), Lakeland (up 678 percent) and Orlando (up 33 percent). Report methodology The RealtyTrac U.S. Foreclosure Market Report provides a count of the total number of properties with at least one foreclosure filing entered into the RealtyTrac database during the month -- broken out by type of filing. Some foreclosure filings entered into the database during the month may have been recorded in previous months. Data is collected from more than 2,200 counties nationwide, and those counties account for more than 90 percent of the U.S. population. RealtyTrac's report incorporates documents filed in all three phases of foreclosure: Default -- Notice of Default (NOD) and Lis Pendens (LIS); Auction -- Notice of Trustee's Sale and Notice of Foreclosure Sale (NTS and NFS); and Real Estate Owned, or REO properties (that have been foreclosed on and repurchased by a bank). The report does not count a property again if it receives the same type of foreclosure filing multiple times within the estimated foreclosure timeframe for the state where the property is located. About RealtyTrac RealtyTrac is a leading supplier of U.S. real estate data, with nationwide parcel-level records for more than 129 million U.S. parcels that include property characteristics, tax assessor data, sales and mortgage deed records, Automated Valuation Models (AVMs) and 20 million active and historical default, foreclosure auction and bank-owned properties. RealtyTrac's housing data and foreclosure reports are relied on by the Federal Reserve, U.S. Treasury Department, HUD, numerous state housing and banking departments, investment funds as well as millions of real estate professionals and consumers, to help evaluate housing trends and make informed decisions about real estate.
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RealtyTrac Foreclosure Data Integrated Into RE/MAX Search
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U.S. Median Home Price Appreciation Accelerates in April as Short Sales and Foreclosure Sales Slow
IRVINE, CA, May 29, 2014-- RealtyTrac®, the nation's leading source for comprehensive housing data, today released its April 2014 Residential & Foreclosure Sales Report, which shows that U.S. residential properties, including single family homes, condominiums and townhomes, sold at an estimated annual pace of 5,213,793 in April, a decrease of less than 1 percent from March but an increase of 4 percent from April 2013. The median sales price of U.S. residential properties -- including both distressed and non-distressed sales -- was $172,000 in April, an increase of 4 percent from the previous month and an increase of 11 percent from April 2013 -- the biggest year-over-year increase since U.S. median prices bottomed out in March 2012. "April home sales numbers are exhibiting the continued effects of low supply and still-strong demand that exist in many markets across the country," said Daren Blomquist, vice president at RealtyTrac. "Annualized sales volume nationwide decreased on a monthly basis for the sixth consecutive month and the 4 percent annual increase in April was the lowest year-over-year increase so far this year. Meanwhile median home prices nationwide increased to the highest level since December 2008. "U.S. median home prices have now increased 21 percent since hitting bottom in March 2012, although they are still 28 percent below their pre-recession peak of $237,537 in August 2006," Blomquist continued. "There are a surprising number of markets, however, where median home prices have surpassed their previous peaks since the Great Recession ended in June 2009." Median prices surpass pre-recession levels in 19 percent of major counties Since the recession ended in June 2009, median prices of residential property have surpassed pre-recession and recession levels (Jan 2005 through June 2009) in 53 counties, representing 19 percent of the 274 counties with a population of 200,000 or more where sufficient home price data is available. New home price peaks were reached in the last two years in 28 counties, representing 10 percent of the total 274 counties analyzed, and seven counties reached new home price peaks in April 2014: San Francisco County, Calif.; Travis County, Texas in the Austin metro area; Jefferson County, Colo., in the Denver metro area; Marion County, Ind., in the Indianapolis metro area; Weld County, Colo., in the Greeley metro area northeast of Denver; Brazoria County, Texas in the Houston metro area; and Norfolk City, Va., in the Virginia Beach metro area. Counties where the post-recession median home price peak is furthest above the pre-recession/recession median home price peak included Denver County, Colo. (up 16.6 percent), District of Columbia (up 14.5 percent), Arlington, Va., (up 12.6 percent), San Francisco County, Calif. (up 11.8 percent), New York County, N.Y. (up 11.1 percent), and Oklahoma County, Oklahoma (up 10.2 percent). "We are starting to exceed pre-recession levels in all categories of the market in Oklahoma," said Sheldon Detrick, CEO of Prudential Detrick/Alliance Realty, covering the Oklahoma City and Tulsa, Okla. markets. 1"Home value appreciation continues to rise despite a continued lack of available inventory." Sales volume decreases annually in 13 states, 28 of 50 largest metro areas Annualized sales volume in April decreased from a year ago in 13 states and the District of Columbia, along with 28 of the nation's 50 largest metropolitan statistical areas. States with decreasing sales volume from a year ago included California (down 13 percent), Nevada (down 9 percent), Arizona (down 8 percent), Florida (down 2 percent), Maryland (down 1 percent), and Michigan (down 1 percent). Major metro areas with decreasing sales volume from a year ago included Fresno, Calif., (down 23 percent), Boston (down 22 percent), Orlando (down 18 percent), San Francisco (down 16 percent), Los Angeles (down 14 percent), and Phoenix (down 12 percent). "We are seeing median sales prices increase throughout Southern California as affordable inventory clears out, pushing people into higher price points," said Chris Pollinger, senior vice president of sales at First Team Real Estate, covering the Southern California market. "The rise in median price has offset the reduction in inventory to provide a stable overall market." Home price appreciation continues to cool in some of last year's hottest markets Nationwide median home prices in April increased 11 percent from a year ago -- the biggest year-over-year increase since U.S. median residential property prices bottomed out in March 2012. April marked the 25th consecutive month where U.S. median prices increased on an annual basis. But home price appreciation continued to show signs of slowing in some of the fastest appreciating markets from a year ago. In Phoenix, median sales prices for residential property increased 9 percent annually, down from 30 percent annual price appreciation in April 2013 and the lowest annual price appreciation for the city since March 2012. Denver median prices increased 6 percent annually in April, down from 16 percent annual price appreciation a year ago and the lowest annual price appreciation since April 2012; Jacksonville, Fla., median prices increased 4 percent annually in April, down from 17 percent annual price appreciation a year ago and the fourth consecutive month with single-digit annual price appreciation; Tampa, Fla., median prices increased 5 percent annually in April, down from 19 percent annual price appreciation a year ago and the second consecutive month with single-digit home price appreciation; and Tucson, Ariz., median prices increased 1 percent annually in April, down from 15 percent annual price appreciation a year ago and the eighth consecutive month with single-digit home price appreciation. "Rising home prices in the Ohio market has helped return equity to many households throughout the state," said Michael Mahon, executive vice president/broker at HER Realtors, covering the Cincinnati, Columbus and Dayton, Ohio markets. "Low inventory levels and the predicted increasing interest rates toward year end will create changes in housing affordability as we proceed into the second half of 2014." Markets with strongest home price appreciation Although home price appreciation showed signs of cooling in several coastal California markets including as Los Angeles, San Diego and San Francisco, inland California markets posted three of the top five annual increases in median prices in April among metropolitan areas with a population of 500,000 or more. Topping the list was Modesto, Calif., with a 28 percent annual increase in median prices, followed by Stockton with a 24 percent annual increase. Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario in Southern California posted a 20 percent annual increase in median home prices, third highest among metros nationwide, and Sacramento also posted a nearly 20 percent annual increase in home prices, the seventh highest nationwide. Other cities among the top 10 for annual home price appreciation in April were Detroit (up 23 percent), Miami (up 20 percent), Atlanta (up 20 percent) and the Ohio cities of Dayton (up 20 percent) and Akron (up 18 percent). Columbus, Ohio also posted a double-digit percentage increase in median prices from a year ago, up 16 percent, and the three Ohio cities all saw accelerating annual home price appreciation compared to a year ago. Distressed sales and short sales drop to lowest level year-to-date in April Short sales and distressed sales -- in foreclosure or bank-owned -- accounted for 15.6 percent of all sales in April, down from 16.5 percent of all sales in March, and down from 17.2 percent of all sales in April 2013. Metro areas with the highest share of combined short sales and distressed sales were Las Vegas (37.7 percent), Stockton, Calif., (33.3 percent), Modesto, Calif., (31.7 percent), Lakeland, Fla., (31.4 percent), Orlando, Fla. (29.3 percent), and Cleveland (27.8 percent). Short sales nationwide accounted for 5.2 percent of all sales in April, down from 5.5 percent of all sales in March and down from 6.3 percent of all sales in April 2013. Metros with the highest percentage of short sales in April were Orlando, Fla., (14.8 percent), Lakeland, Fla., (14.5 percent), Tampa, Fla., (13.9 percent), Palm Bay, Fla., (13.2 percent), and Las Vegas (11.5 percent). Sales of bank-owned (REO) properties nationwide accounted for 9.2 percent of all sales in April, down from 9.7 percent of all sales in March and down from 10.0 percent of all sales in April 2013. Metros with the highest percentage of REO sales in April were Modesto, Calif., (25.7 percent), Stockton, Calif., (25.6 percent), Las Vegas (23.0 percent), Akron, Ohio (22.3 percent), Dayton, Ohio (20.6 percent), and the Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario metro area in Southern California (19.9 percent). Sales at the public foreclosure auction accounted for 1.2 percent of all sales nationwide in April, down from 1.3 percent of all sales in March, but still up from 0.8 percent of all sales in April 2013. Metros with the highest percentage of foreclosure auction sales in April included Lakeland, Fla., (5.0 percent), Orlando, Fla., (4.9 percent), Atlanta (3.6 percent), Miami (3.5 percent), Las Vegas (3.2 percent), and Jacksonville, Fla., (3.2 percent). About RealtyTrac RealtyTrac is a leading supplier of U.S. real estate data, with nationwide parcel-level records for more than 125 million U.S. parcels that include property characteristics, tax assessor data, sales and mortgage deed records, Automated Valuation Models (AVMs) and 20 million active and historical default, foreclosure auction and bank-owned properties. RealtyTrac's housing data and foreclosure reports are relied on by many federal government agencies, numerous state housing and banking departments, investment funds as well as millions of real estate professionals and consumers, to help evaluate housing trends and make informed decisions about real estate.
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity Decreases 10 Percent in February From January Jump to Lowest Level in More Than 7 Years
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Better to Buy Bank Owned or Short Sale?
Short sales are on the rise as a better alternative to foreclosure in many areas — good news for buyers and investors in markets where short sales are closing more quickly at solid discounts. But buying from the bank may still be a better option in other markets because of increasing REO inventory, deeper discounts and shorter times to close. Analyzing data from the RealtyTrac Foreclosure & Short Sales Report from the fourth quarter of 2012 in more than 900 metro areas nationwide, we've come up with the top 15 markets for buying bank-owned homes in 2013 and the top 15 markets for buying short sales in 2013. Better to Buy Short Sale Short sales — both of properties in the foreclosure process as well as those not in the foreclosure process — surged in the fourth quarter compared to a year ago in the top 15 markets for buying short sales, ranging from a 37 percent annual increase in Detroit to a 107 percent annual increase in Santa Barbara, Calif. Only markets with at least 200 short sales in the fourth quarter of 2012 were included in the list. Average sales prices on short sales in the top 15 markets ranged from $91,145 in the Grand Rapids, Mich., metro to $283,825 in the Santa Barbara, Calif., metro. The average amount short — difference between the sales price and the loan amount owed to the bank — ranged from $53,158 in Grand Rapids to $178,201 in Santa Barbara. The average amount short was more than $100,000 in seven of the top 15 markets, indicating banks are willing to realize a significant loss with a short sale in exchange for avoiding the increasingly complex and costly foreclosure process. Better to Buy Bank Owned The top 15 markets for buying bank-owned homes all saw sharp increases in bank-owned sales in the fourth quarter — ranging from an annual increase of 141 percent in Cleveland, Ohio, to a 19 percent increase in Sarasota, Fla. The top 15 list was limited to markets with at least 200 bank-owned sales in the fourth quarter where bank-owned sales accounted for at least 10 percent of all residential sales. In addition, the average sales price of a bank-owned home was at least 30 percent below the average sales price of a non-distressed home in all 15 metro areas selected. In all 15 markets, the average number of days from bank repossession to sale was below the national average of 178 days in the fourth quarter. To view the original post, visit RealtyTrac.
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