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U.S. Foreclosure Activity in October 2019 Climbs Upward from Previous Month
Completed Foreclosures (REOs) Reach Highest Point in 2019; Two Metro Areas in Illinois Now Rank Highest in Worst Foreclosure Rate; Foreclosure Starts Increase 17 Percent From Last Month IRVINE, Calif. (Nov. 14, 2019) -- ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database and first property data provider of Data-as-a-Service (DaaS), today released its October 2019 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report, which shows there were a total of 55,197 U.S. properties with foreclosure filings — default notices, scheduled auctions or bank repossessions — in October 2019, up 13 percent from the previous month but down 17 percent from a year ago. "While foreclosure activity across the United States rose in October, in looking at historical trends, October numbers tend to increase as lenders may be pushing filings through the pipeline before the holiday season," said Todd Teta, chief product officer with ATTOM Data Solutions. "The latest number is still below where it was a year ago and less than 15 percent of what it was during the depths of the Great Recession." Foreclosure completion numbers climb in 2019 Lenders repossessed 13,484 U.S. properties through completed foreclosures (REOs) in October 2019, up 14 percent from last month, hitting the highest point in total number of completed foreclosures in 2019. States that saw the greatest number in REOs in October 2019 included: Florida (1,493 REOs); Texas (912 REOs); Michigan (890 REOs); California (824 REOs); and Illinois (805 REOs). Those major metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) with a population greater than 200,000 that saw the greatest number of REOs included: Detroit, MI (705 REOs); New York, NY (684 REOs); Chicago, IL (679 REOs); Philadelphia, PA (470 REOs); and Atlanta, GA (430 REOs). Highest foreclosure rates in New Jersey, Illinois and Maryland Nationwide one in every 2,453 housing units had a foreclosure filing in October 2019. States with the highest foreclosure rates were New Jersey (one in every 1,316 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Illinois (one in every 1,336 housing units); Maryland (one in every 1,484 housing units); South Carolina (one in every 1,534 housing units); and Florida (one in every 1,571 housing units). Among the 220 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000, those with the highest foreclosure rates in October were Peoria, IL (one in every 832 housing units); Rockford, IL (one in every 889 housing units); Atlantic City, NJ (one in every 933 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Fayetteville, NC (one in every 962 housing units); and Columbia, SC (one in every 1,028 housing units). Foreclosure starts increase monthly in 36 states Lenders started the foreclosure process on 28,667 U.S. properties in October 2019, up 17 percent from last month but down 1 percent from a year ago — the first double-digit month-over-month increase since February 2018. States that saw a double digit increases from last month included: Arizona (up 52 percent); Ohio (up 52 percent); Florida (up 48 percent); New Jersey (up 47 percent); and California (up 36 percent). Counter to the national trend, 13 states including Washington, DC posted month-over-month decreases in foreclosure starts in October 2019, including Maryland (down 42 percent); Idaho (down 36 percent); Delaware (down 32 percent); Nebraska (down 26 percent); and Utah (down 25 percent). About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, APIs, real estate market trends, marketing lists, match & append and introducing the first property data delivery solution, a cloud-based data platform that streamlines data management – Data-as-a-Service (DaaS).
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CoreLogic Reports U.S. Overall Delinquency Rate Lowest for an August in at Least 20 Years but Five States Post Annual Gains
CoreLogic, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its monthly Loan Performance Insights Report. The report shows that nationally, 3.7% of mortgages were in some stage of delinquency (30 days or more past due, including those in foreclosure) in August 2019, representing a 0.2 percentage point decline in the overall delinquency rate compared with August 2018, when it was 3.9%. As of August 2019, the foreclosure inventory rate – which measures the share of mortgages in some stage of the foreclosure process – was 0.4%, down 0.1 percentage points from August 2018. The August 2019 foreclosure inventory rate tied the prior nine months as the lowest for any month since at least January 1999. Measuring early-stage delinquency rates is important for analyzing the health of the mortgage market. To monitor mortgage performance comprehensively, CoreLogic examines all stages of delinquency, as well as transition rates, which indicate the percentage of mortgages moving from one stage of delinquency to the next. The rate for early-stage delinquencies – defined as 30 to 59 days past due – was 1.8% in August 2019, unchanged from August 2018. The share of mortgages 60 to 89 days past due in August 2019 was 0.6%, unchanged from August 2018. The serious delinquency rate – defined as 90 days or more past due, including loans in foreclosure – was 1.3% in August 2019, down from 1.5% in August 2018. This August's serious delinquency rate of 1.3% was the lowest for the month of August since 2005 when it was also 1.3%. The serious delinquency rate has remained consistent since April 2019. Since early-stage delinquencies can be volatile, CoreLogic also analyzes transition rates. The share of mortgages that transitioned from current to 30 days past due was 0.8% in August 2019, unchanged from August 2018. By comparison, in January 2007, just before the start of the financial crisis, the current-to-30-day transition rate was 1.2%, while it peaked at 2% in November 2008. "Job loss can trigger a loan delinquency, especially for families with limited savings," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist at CoreLogic. "The rise in overall delinquency in Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska and Wisconsin coincided with a rise in state unemployment rates between August 2018 and August 2019." The nation's overall delinquency remains near the lowest level since at least 1999. However, five states posted small annual increases in overall delinquency rates in August: Iowa (0.2 percentage points), Minnesota (0.1 percentage points), Nebraska (0.1 percentage points), Wisconsin (0.1 percentage points) and Rhode Island (0.1 percentage points). In August 2019, 47 metropolitan areas recorded small annual increases in overall delinquency rates. Some of the highest gains were in the Midwest and Southeast. Metros with the largest increases were Dubuque, Iowa (2.2 percentage points), Pine Bluff, Arkansas (1.1 percentage points), Goldsboro, North Carolina (0.6 percentage points) and Panama City, Florida (0.5 percentage points). While the nation's serious delinquency rate remains near a record low, 19 metropolitan areas recorded small annual increases in their serious delinquency rates. Metros with the largest increases were Panama City, Florida (0.9 percentage points), Jacksonville, North Carolina (0.2 percentage points), Wilmington, North Carolina (0.2 percentage points) and Goldsboro, North Carolina (0.2 percentage points). The remaining 15 metro areas logged annual increases of 0.1 percentage point. "Delinquency rates are at 14-year lows, reflecting a decade of tight underwriting standards, the benefits of prolonged low interest rates and the improved balance sheets of many households across the country," said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "Despite this month's near record-low serious delinquency rate, several metros in hurricane-ravaged areas of the Southeast have experienced higher delinquency rates of late. We expect to see these metros to return to pre-disaster delinquency rates over the next several months." The next CoreLogic Loan Performance Insights Report will be released on December 10, 2019, featuring data for September 2019. For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog. About CoreLogic CoreLogic, the leading provider of property insights and solutions, promotes a healthy housing market and thriving communities. Through its enhanced property data solutions, services and technologies, CoreLogic enables real estate professionals, financial institutions, insurance carriers, government agencies and other housing market participants to help millions of people find, acquire and protect their homes. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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Q3 2019 Foreclosure Activity Down 19 Percent from Year Ago to Lowest Level Since Q2 2005
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CoreLogic Reports U.S. Overall Delinquency Rate Lowest for a July in at Least 20 Years, but Four States Post Annual Gains
CoreLogic, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its monthly Loan Performance Insights Report. The report shows that nationally, 3.8% of mortgages were in some stage of delinquency (30 days or more past due, including those in foreclosure) in July 2019, representing a 0.3 percentage point decline in the overall delinquency rate compared with July 2018, when it was 4.1%. As of July 2019, the foreclosure inventory rate – which measures the share of mortgages in some stage of the foreclosure process – was 0.4%, down 0.1 percentage points from July 2018. The July 2019 foreclosure inventory rate tied the prior eight months as the lowest for any month since at least January 1999. Measuring early-stage delinquency rates is important for analyzing the health of the mortgage market. To monitor mortgage performance comprehensively, CoreLogic examines all stages of delinquency, as well as transition rates, which indicate the percentage of mortgages moving from one stage of delinquency to the next. The rate for early-stage delinquencies – defined as 30 to 59 days past due – was 1.8% in July 2019, down from 1.9% in July 2018. The share of mortgages 60 to 89 days past due in July 2019 was 0.6%, unchanged from July 2018. The serious delinquency rate – defined as 90 days or more past due, including loans in foreclosure – was 1.3% in July 2019, down from 1.6% in July 2018. This July's serious delinquency rate of 1.3% was the lowest for the month of July since 2005 when it was also 1.3%; it tied the April, May and June 2019 rates as the lowest for any month since it was also 1.3% in August 2005. Since early-stage delinquencies can be volatile, CoreLogic also analyzes transition rates. The share of mortgages that transitioned from current to 30 days past due was 0.8% in July 2019, unchanged from July 2018. By comparison, in January 2007, just before the start of the financial crisis, the current-to-30-day transition rate was 1.2%, while it peaked at 2% in November 2008. "Homeowners have seen a big rise in home equity, which lowers foreclosure risk because owners have more ‘skin in the game,'" said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist at CoreLogic. "Our latest Home Equity report found that between the first quarter of 2011 and the second quarter of 2019, average equity per borrower increased from $75,000 to $176,000 and rose $5,000 in the past year alone." The nation's overall delinquency remains near the lowest level since at least 1999. However, four states posted small annual increases in overall delinquency rates in July: Vermont (0.5 percentage points), New Hampshire (0.2 percentage points), Iowa (0.1 percentage points) and Minnesota (0.1 percentage points). Five states, including three of the four listed above, posted small annual gains in the share of mortgages that transitioned from current-to-30-days past due in July: Vermont (0.3 percentage points), New Hampshire (0.1 percentage points), Iowa (0.1 percentage points), Wisconsin (0.1 percentage points) and Florida (0.1 percentage points). In July 2019, 37 metropolitan areas recorded small increases in overall delinquency rates. Some of the highest gains were in the Midwest and Southeast. Metros with the largest increases were Dubuque, Iowa (2.5 percentage points), Davenport-Moline-Rock Island, Iowa-Illinois (1.5 percentage points) and Pine Bluff, Arkansas (1.1 percentage points). Panama City, Florida, and Goldsboro, North Carolina, both experienced increases of 0.5 percentage points. "The fundamentals of the housing market remain very solid with foreclosure rates hitting lows not seen in over 20 years," said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "We expect foreclosure rates may very well drift even lower in the months ahead as wage growth and lower mortgage rates provide support for homeownership." The next CoreLogic Loan Performance Insights Report will be released on November 12, 2019, featuring data for August 2019. For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX), the leading provider of property insights and solutions, promotes a healthy housing market and thriving communities. Through its enhanced property data solutions, services and technologies, CoreLogic enables real estate professionals, financial institutions, insurance carriers, government agencies and other housing market participants to help millions of people find, acquire and protect their homes. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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CoreLogic Reports Stark Contrast Between Rising Mortgage Delinquencies in Eight States while National Rate Remains at 20-Year Low
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Over 1.5 Million Vacant U.S. Homes in Q3 2019 Represent 1.6 Percent of All Single-Family Homes and Condos
Over 9,600 Vacant "Zombie" Foreclosures in the Third Quarter of 2019 IRVINE, Calif. - August 15, 2019 -- ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database and first property data provider of Data-as-a-Service (DaaS), today released its Q3 2019 Vacant Property and Zombie Foreclosure Report showing there are over 1.5 million (1,530,563) U.S. single-family homes and condos vacant in the third quarter of 2019, representing 1.6 percent of all homes. The report analyzes publicly recorded real estate data collected by ATTOM Data Solutions — including foreclosure status, equity, and owner-occupancy status — matched against monthly updated vacancy data. (See full methodology enclosed below.) During the third quarter of 2019, over 304,000 homes were in the process of foreclosure, with about 3.2 percent being "zombie" foreclosures. While the count of properties in the process of foreclosure is down by nearly 22 percent since ATTOM's last foreclosure vacancy report in the same period of 2016, the number that sits empty has dropped nearly in half. "The blight of vacant, decaying properties facing foreclosure has declined dramatically across the United States – another good-news offshoot of the housing boom that's gone on for eight years," said Todd Teta, chief product officer with ATTOM Data Solutions. "A handful of areas still face notable problems with homes abandoned by owners after they get hit with foreclosure claims. But with the economy improving and the housing market still hot, an expanding number of neighborhoods across the country face little or no problem with these so-called zombie properties." High-level findings from the report: A total of 9,612 properties facing possible foreclosure have been vacated by their owners nationwide. Washington, D.C. had the highest percentage of zombie foreclosures (12.5 percent). States where the rates were above the national average of 3.2 percent included Oregon (8.8 percent), Maine (8.5 percent), Kansas (7.6 percent) and New Mexico (7.0 percent). The lowest rates – all less than 1.4 percent – were in New Hampshire, Idaho, Colorado, Connecticut and Delaware. New York had the highest actual number of zombie properties (2,428), followed by Florida (1,634), Illinois (985), Ohio (891) and New Jersey (463). Among metropolitan areas with at least 100,000 residential properties, Peoria, IL, had the highest percent of vacant foreclosures (zombies) at 16.5 percent, followed by Wichita, KS (9.5 percent), Syracuse, NY (9.3 percent), Honolulu, HI (8.5 percent) and Youngstown, OH (8.4 percent). Among zip codes with at least 100 properties in pre-foreclosure, the highest rates of owner-vacated properties were concentrated in New York, Florida, Ohio and Illinois. The zip codes with the top percentages were zip code 61605 in the Peoria, IL metropolitan statistical area with 48.6 percent, zip codes 44108 (26.0 percent), 44112 (23.0 percent), and 44105 (19.7 percent), all in the Cleveland, OH, area and rounding out the top five is zip code 14701 in Jamestown, NY with 19.6 percent. The top zombie foreclosure rates in counties with at least 500 properties in foreclosure included Peoria County, IL (21.9 percent); Baltimore City, MD (11.4 percent); Broome County, NY (11.1 percent); Onondaga County, NY (9.6 percent) and Madison County, IL (9.6 percent). The highest levels of vacant investor-owned properties were in Indiana (8.8 percent), Kansas (6.7 percent), Minnesota (6.0 percent), Ohio, (5.9 percent) and Rhode Island (5.8 percent). Report Methodology ATTOM Data Solutions analyzed county tax assessor data for more than 98 million single-family homes and condos for vacancy, broken down by foreclosure status and, owner-occupancy status. Only metropolitan statistical areas with at least 100,000 single-family homes and condos and counties with at least 50,000 single-family homes and condos were included in the analysis. Vacancy data is available here. About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, APIs, market trends, marketing lists, match & append and introducing the first property data deliver solution, a cloud-based data platform that streamlines data management – Data-as-a-Service (DaaS).
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CoreLogic Reports U.S. Overall Delinquency Rate Remains Steady at 20-Year Low in May
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296,458 U.S. Properties with Foreclosure Filings in First Six Months of 2019, Down 18 Percent from a Year Ago
Foreclosure Starts Decrease Nationwide, But Increase in 42 Percent of Local Markets; Q2 2019 Foreclosure Activity Below Pre-Recession Levels in 62 Percent of Markets IRVINE, Calif. – August 8, 2019 — ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database and first property data provider of Data-as-a-Service (DaaS), today released its Midyear 2019 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report, which shows a total of 296,458 U.S. properties with foreclosure filings — default notices, scheduled auctions or bank repossessions — in the first six months of 2019, down 18 percent from the same period a year ago and down 82 percent from a peak of 1,654,634 in the first six months of 2010. Counter to the national trend, 36 of the 220 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report (16 percent) posted a year-over-year increase in foreclosure activity in the first six months of 2019, including Buffalo, New York (up 33 percent); Orlando, Florida (up 32 percent); Jacksonville, Florida (up 18 percent); Miami, Florida (up 7 percent); and Tampa-St. Petersburg, Florida (up 5 percent). "Our midyear 2019 foreclosure activity helps to show an overall view on how foreclosure activity is trending downward," said Todd Teta, chief product officer at ATTOM Data Solutions. "Of course, you still have pockets across the nation where foreclosure activity is seeing some flare-ups. Foreclosure starts is a good indication of markets to watch. For instance, in looking at the largest markets across the nation with the greatest annual increase in foreclosure starts, 4 out of the 5 markets were in Florida. " New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland post highest state foreclosure rates Nationwide 0.22 percent of all housing units (one in every 457) had a foreclosure filing in the first six months of 2019. States with the highest foreclosure rates in the first half of 2019 were New Jersey (0.54 percent); Delaware (0.46 percent); Maryland (0.43 percent); Florida (0.39 percent); and Illinois (0.38 percent). Other states with first-half 2019 foreclosure rates among the 10 highest nationwide were South Carolina (0.33 percent); Connecticut (0.32 percent); Ohio (0.30 percent); Nevada (0.26 percent); and New Mexico (0.26 percent). Atlantic City, Jacksonville, Trenton, with highest metro foreclosure rates Among 220 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report, those with the highest foreclosure rates in the first half of 2019 were Atlantic City, New Jersey (0.92 percent of all housing units with a foreclosure filing); Jacksonville, Florida (0.54 percent); Trenton, New Jersey (0.52 percent); Rockford, Illinois (0.51 percent); and Lakeland, Florida (0.51 percent). Other metro areas with foreclosure rates ranking among the top 10 highest in the first half of 2019 were Columbia, South Carolina (0.49 percent); Ocala, Florida (0.49 percent); Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (.48 percent); Fayetteville, North Carolina (0.47 percent); and Baltimore, Maryland (0.44 percent). First-half foreclosure starts down nationwide, up in 42 percent of local markets A total of 177,015 U.S. properties started the foreclosure process in the first six months of 2019, down 8 percent from the first half of 2018 and down 84 percent from a peak of 1,074,471 in the first half of 2009. Counter to the national trend, 16 states posted a year-over-year increase in foreclosure starts in the first half of 2019, including Mississippi (up 56 percent); Florida (up 28 percent); Georgia (up 22 percent); Arkansas (up 21 percent); and Louisiana (up 19 percent). Also counter to the national trend, 92 of the 217 metro areas analyzed in the report (42 percent) posted year-over-year increases in foreclosure starts in the first half of 2019, including Miami, Florida (up 32 percent); Tampa-St. Petersburg, Florida (up 18 percent); Atlanta, Georgia (up 16 percent); Washington D.C. (up 8 percent); and Denver, Colorado (up 6 percent). Q2 2019 foreclosure activity below pre-recession levels in 62 percent of markets A total of 152,760 U.S. properties had a foreclosure filing in Q2 2019, down 6 percent from the previous quarter and down 19 percent from a year ago. The second quarter of 2019 was the eleventh consecutive quarter in which U.S. foreclosure activity was below the pre-recession average of 278,912 properties with foreclosure filings per quarter in 2006 and 2007. Foreclosure activity in the second quarter of 2019 was below pre-recession averages in 136 of the 220 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report (62 percent), including Denver, Colorado (92 percent below); Detroit, Michigan (89 percent below); Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas (81 percent below); Atlanta, Georgia (80 percent below); and Memphis, Tennessee (80 percent below). Counter to the national trend, 84 of the 220 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report (38 percent) posted Q2 2019 foreclosure activity totals above their pre-recession averages, including New Orleans, Louisiana (56 percent above); Birmingham, Alabama (26 percent above); Washington, D.C. (22 percent above); Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (6 percent above); New York-Newark-Jersey City (up 4 percent). Average foreclosure timeline drops to lowest level since Q3 2018 Properties foreclosed in the second quarter of 2019 took an average of 716 days from the first public foreclosure notice to complete the foreclosure process, down from 835 days in the previous quarter and down from 720 days in the second quarter of 2018. States with the longest average foreclosure timelines for foreclosures completed in Q2 2019 were Hawaii (1,611 days), Indiana (1,360 days), Florida (1,073 days), New York (1,057 days), and New Jersey (982 days). States with the shortest average foreclosure timelines for foreclosures completed in Q2 2019 were Mississippi (195 days), Minnesota (226 days), Virginia (228 days), Alaska (242 days), and Maine (277 days). About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, APIs, market trends, marketing lists, match & append and introducing the first property data deliver solution, a cloud-based data platform that streamlines data management – Data-as-a-Service (DaaS).
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CoreLogic Reports Lowest Overall Delinquency Rate in More than 20 Years This April
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U.S. Completed Foreclosures Decrease 50 Percent from a Year Ago
Foreclosure Starts Continue Upward Trend in Florida; New Jersey, Maryland and Florida Rank Highest in Foreclosure Rate; Overall Foreclosure Activity Decreases 22 Percent from a Year Ago IRVINE, Calif. – June 13, 2019 – ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database and first property data provider of Data-as-a-Service (DaaS), today released its May 2019 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report, which shows foreclosure filings — default notices, scheduled auctions and bank repossessions — were reported on 56,152 U.S. properties in May 2019, up 1 percent from the previous month but down 22 percent from a year ago for the 11th consecutive month with an annual decline. "We are continuing to see a downward trend with overall foreclosure activity, especially in completed foreclosures declining year after year," said Todd Teta, chief product officer at ATTOM Data Solutions. "However, in May 2019 we did see an uptick in the number of states increasing in foreclosure starts going from 17 to 23 states rising annually, and again Florida is bucking the national trend with a continuous annual increase." May 2019 Foreclosure Starts by County Foreclosure completions decline annually in every state except Vermont Lenders completed foreclosures (REO) on 10,634 U.S. properties in May 2019, down 4 percent from the previous month and down 50 percent from a year ago – a 7th consecutive annual decline. States across the nation, except for Vermont all saw annual declines in completed foreclosures. Those that saw an annual decline of more than 50 percent in REOs included Michigan (down 84 percent); Massachusetts (down 74 percent); Indiana (down 67 percent); Kentucky (down 66 percent); and New Jersey (down 64 percent). In looking at those greater metropolitan areas with a population of 200,000 or more and those that had at least 100 completed foreclosures in May 2019, with double-digit decreases were Birmingham, Alabama (down 67 percent); New York, New York (down 59 percent); Washington, DC (down 58 percent); Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (down 57 percent); and Detroit, Michigan (down 54 percent). Florida foreclosure starts continuing double-digit annual increase Lenders started the foreclosure process on 30,554 U.S. properties in May 2019, while slightly up (less than 1 percent) from last month they are down 9 percent from May 2018 –fourth consecutive month with an annual decline. Counter to the national trend states that saw an increase in foreclosure starts in May 2019 were Wisconsin (up 99 percent); Kentucky (up 64 percent); Louisiana (up 53 percent); Missouri (up 34 percent); and Florida (up 23 percent). This is the 12th consecutive month that Florida has seen double-digit annual increases in foreclosure starts. "To put the numbers in perspective, I would use a full year, perhaps 2006 as a "normal" benchmark number. That would be the last year before the real estate world crashed," said Bruce Norris, president of The Norris Group. "The total foreclosure starts for Florida in 2006 was 102,875. In 2018, there were 33,031 foreclosure starts. Even at a 25% increase over 2018, 2019 will still be less than 50% of 2006. An increase of some 8,000 foreclosure starts is not a game changer at this point." States that posted annual decreases in foreclosure starts in May 2019, included Texas (down 39 percent); Pennsylvania (down 38 percent); Massachusetts (down 34 percent); Oklahoma (down 29 percent); and New York (down 25 percent). Those major metropolitan statistical areas with a population greater than 1,000,000 that saw an annual decrease in foreclosure starts included Indianapolis, Indiana (down 82 percent); Houston, Texas (down 65 percent); San Jose, California (down 58 percent); Austin, Texas (down 41 percent); and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (down 34 percent). New Jersey, Maryland and Florida rank top 3 in worst foreclosure rate Nationwide one in every 2,411 housing units had a foreclosure filing in May 2019. States with the highest foreclosure rates were New Jersey (one in every 1,117 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Maryland (one in every 1,127 housing units); Florida (one in every 1,238 housing units); Delaware (one in every 1,279 housing units); and Illinois (one in every 1,363 housing units). Among 220 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000, those with the highest foreclosure rates in May 2019 were Atlantic City, New Jersey (one in every 680 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Jacksonville, Florida (one in every 764 housing units); Fayetteville, North Carolina (one in every 777 housing units); Columbia, South Carolina (one in every 936 housing units); and Rockford, Illinois (one in every 941 housing units). About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, APIs, market trends, marketing lists, match & append and introducing the first property data deliver solution, a cloud-based data platform that streamlines data management – Data-as-a-Service (DaaS).
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CoreLogic Reports Lowest U.S. Foreclosure Rate for a March in at Least 20 Years; Overall and Serious Delinquency Rates for a March at 13 Year Lows
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity Decreases 13 Percent in April 2019
Foreclosure Starts Spike in Washington, Florida, Oregon and Louisiana; New Jersey, Maryland and Delaware Rank Highest in Foreclosure Rate; Completed Foreclosures Decrease 22 Percent IRVINE, Calif. – May 16, 2019 – ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database and first property data provider of Data-as-a-Service (DaaS), today released its April 2019 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report, which shows foreclosure filings — default notices, scheduled auctions and bank repossessions — were reported on 55,646 U.S. properties in April 2019, down 5 percent from the previous month and down 13 percent from a year ago for the 10th consecutive month with an annual decline. "While overall foreclosure activity is down nationwide, there are still parts of the country that we need to keep a close eye on," said Todd Teta, chief product officer at ATTOM Data Solutions. "For instance, Florida is seeing a steady annual increase in total foreclosure activity for the 8th consecutive month, which is being sustained by a constant annual double-digit increase in foreclosure starts." April 2019 County Foreclosure Heat Map Foreclosure starts increase annually in 17 states Lenders started the foreclosure process on 30,524 U.S. properties in April 2019, down 5 percent from last month and down 10 percent from April 2018 –third consecutive month with an annual decline. States that posted annual decreases in foreclosure starts in April 2019, included New York (down 43 percent); Nevada (down 36 percent); Colorado (down 34 percent); Maryland (down 31 percent); and Michigan (down 25 percent). Those major metropolitan statistical areas with a population greater than 500,000 that saw a large annual increase in foreclosure starts from last year included Orlando, Florida (up 90 percent); Miami, Florida (up 45 percent); Columbus, Ohio (up 35 percent); Portland, Oregon (up 31 percent); and El Paso, Texas (up 22 percent). Counter to the national trend 17 states had an annual increase in foreclosure starts. Those states included Washington (up 38 percent); Florida (up 34 percent); Oregon (up 22 percent); Louisiana (up 12 percent); and Georgia (up 11 percent). Highest foreclosure rates in New Jersey, Maryland and Delaware Nationwide one in every 2,433 housing units had a foreclosure filing in April 2019. States with the highest foreclosure rates were New Jersey (one in every 980 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Maryland (one in every 1,218 housing units); Delaware (one in every 1,249 housing units); Illinois (one in every 1,371 housing units); and Florida (one in every 1,415 housing units). Among 220 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000, those with the highest foreclosure rates in April 2019 were Atlantic City, New Jersey (one in every 702 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Fayetteville, North Carolina (one in every 732 housing units); Clarksville, Tennessee (one in every 853 housing units); Columbia, South Carolina (one in every 946 housing units); and Deltona-Daytona Beach, Florida (one in every 966 housing units). Foreclosure completions continue to decline Lenders completed foreclosures (REO) on 11,078 U.S. properties in April 2019, down 9 percent from the previous month and down 22 percent from a year ago – a 6th consecutive annual decline. States that saw a double-digit annual decline in REOs included Alabama (down 45 percent); Arizona (down 38 percent); North Carolina (down 32 percent); California (down 20 percent); and Nevada (down 14 percent). Counter to the national trend, 10 states posted year-over-year increases in REOs in April 2019, including Washington (up 53 percent); Connecticut (up 22 percent); Kentucky (up 19 percent); and New York (up 3 percent). About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, APIs, market trends, marketing lists, match & append and introducing the first property data deliver solution, a cloud-based data platform that streamlines data management – Data-as-a-Service (DaaS).
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CoreLogic Reports U.S. Overall Delinquency Rate Lowest for a February in Nearly Two Decades
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity Decreases 15 Percent in Q1 2019 to Lowest Levels Since Q1 2008
Foreclosure Activity Below Pre-Recession Levels in 60 Percent of U.S. Markets; Foreclosure Starts Up Seven Percent From a Year Ago; Average Foreclosure Timeline Increases 5 Percent From Last Year IRVINE, Calif. – April 11, 2019 — ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database and first property data provider of Data-as-a-Service (DaaS), today released its Q1 2019 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report, which shows a total of 161,875 U.S. properties with a foreclosure filing during the first quarter of 2019, down 23 percent from the previous quarter and down 15 percent from a year ago to the lowest level since Q1 2008. The report also shows a total of 58,550 U.S. properties with foreclosure filings in March 2019, up 7 percent from the previous month but down 21 percent from a year ago — the ninth consecutive month with a year-over-year decrease in U.S. foreclosure activity. "While some markets saw a slight uptick in foreclosure filings, that is above pre-recession levels, the majority of the major markets are well below pre-recession levels," said Todd Teta, chief product officer at ATTOM Data Solutions. "While we did see a slight increase in U.S. foreclosure starts from last quarter, bank repossessions reached an all-time low in the first quarter of 2019, showing continuing signs of a strong housing market." Markets below pre-recession levels include San Jose, Memphis, Dallas-Fort Worth The 132 out of the 220 markets (60 percent) with a population greater than 200,000 in the first quarter foreclosure activity below pre-recession averages included San Jose (79 percent below); Memphis (77 percent below); Dallas-Fort Worth (77 percent below); Las Vegas (74 percent below); and Phoenix (68 percent below). Other major markets with first quarter foreclosure activity below pre-recession averages were San Francisco, Riverside-San Bernardino in Southern California, Chicago, Detroit and Seattle. Markets still above pre-recession levels include Baltimore, Washington D.C., Philadelphia In 88 out of the 220 markets analyzed (40 percent), first quarter foreclosure activity levels were still above pre-recession averages, including Baltimore (189 percent above); Washington D.C. (26 percent above); Philadelphia (20 percent above); New York (13 percent above); and Hartford (4 percent above). Other major markets with first quarter foreclosure activity above pre-recession averages included Richmond, Virginia; Virginia Beach, Providence, Rhode Island; and New Orleans. Foreclosure starts increase 7 percent from last quarter Lenders started the foreclosure process on 91,397 U.S. properties in Q1 2019, up 7 percent from the previous quarter but down 3 percent from a year ago — the 15th consecutive quarter with a year-over-year decrease in foreclosure starts. Counter to the national trend, 15 states posted year-over-year increases in foreclosure starts in Q1 2019, including Florida (up 65 percent); Georgia (up 30 percent); Texas (up 27 percent); Louisiana (up 20 percent); Washington (up 12 percent); and Maryland (up 11 percent). Bank repossessions down in 48 states and DC Lenders repossessed 35,787 U.S. properties through foreclosure (REO) in Q1 2019, down 21 percent from the previous quarter and down 45 percent from a year ago — the 14th consecutive quarter with a year-over-year decrease in U.S. REOs. Along with the District of Columbia, 48 states posted year-over-year decreases in REOs in the first quarter, including Arizona (down 77 percent); California (down 41 percent); Florida (down 33 percent); New Jersey (down 59 percent); and Texas (down 43 percent). Atlantic City, Lakeland, Trenton highest metro foreclosure rates in Q1 2019 Nationwide one in every 836 U.S. housing units had a foreclosure filing in the first quarter of 2019. States with the highest foreclosure rates in the first quarter were New Jersey (one in 333 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Delaware (one in 364); Maryland (one in 412); Florida (one in 487); and Illinois (one in 489). Among 220 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000, those with the highest foreclosure rates in Q1 2019 were Atlantic City, New Jersey (one in every 177 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Lakeland, Florida (one in 338); Trenton, New Jersey (one in 345); Columbia, South Carolina (one in 372); and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (one in 373). Along with Philadelphia, other major metros with a population of at least 1 million and foreclosure rates in the top 25 highest nationwide included Jacksonville, Florida at No. 7, Baltimore at No.9, Cleveland at No. 13, Chicago at No. 14, Tampa at No. 17, Miami at No. 18, and Orlando at No. 21. Average foreclosure timeline increases 5 percent in first quarter Properties foreclosed in the first quarter of 2019 had been in the foreclosure process an average of 835 days, up 3 percent from an average 811 days for properties foreclosed in the fourth quarter of 2018 and up 5 percent from an average of 791 days for properties foreclosed in the first quarter of 2018. States with the longest average foreclosure timeline for properties foreclosed in Q1 2019 were Indiana (1,806 days), Hawaii (1,565 days), Arizona (1,385 days), New Jersey (1,212 days), and Florida (1,196 days). States with the shortest average time to foreclose in Q1 2019 were West Virginia (159 days), Virginia (206 days), Minnesota (251 days), Alaska (262 days), and Wyoming (269 days). March 2019 Foreclosure Activity High-Level Takeaway Nationwide in March 2019 one in every 2,312 properties had a foreclosure filing States with the highest foreclosure rates in March 2019 were Delaware (one in every 999 housing units with a foreclosure filing); New Jersey (one in every 1,021 housing units); Maryland (one in every 1,077 housing units); Florida (one in every 1,345 housing units); and South Carolina (one in every 1,379 housing units). 32,280 U.S. properties started the foreclosure process in March 2019, up 9 percent from the previous month but down 2 percent from a year ago. March 2019 marked the third consecutive month with a month-over-month increase in foreclosure starts. Lenders completed the foreclosure process on 12,167 U.S. properties in March 2019, up 7 percent from the previous month but down 53 percent from a year ago. About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, APIs, market trends, marketing lists, match & append and introducing the first property data deliver solution, a cloud-based data platform that streamlines data management – Data-as-a-Service (DaaS).
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CoreLogic Reports U.S. Overall Delinquency and Foreclosure Rates Lowest for January in at Least 20 Years
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CoreLogic Reports U.S. Overall Delinquency and Foreclosure Rates Lowest for December Since at Least 2000
CoreLogic, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its monthly Loan Performance Insights Report. The report shows that, nationally, 4.1 percent of mortgages were in some stage of delinquency (30 days or more past due, including those in foreclosure) in December 2018, representing a 1.2 percentage point decline in the overall delinquency rate compared with December 2017, when it was 5.3 percent. As of December 2018, the foreclosure inventory rate – which measures the share of mortgages in some stage of the foreclosure process – was 0.4 percent, down 0.2 percentage points from December 2017. The December 2018 foreclosure inventory rate tied the November 2018 rate as the lowest for any month since at least January 2000. Measuring early-stage delinquency rates is important for analyzing the health of the mortgage market. To monitor mortgage performance comprehensively, CoreLogic examines all stages of delinquency, as well as transition rates, which indicate the percentage of mortgages moving from one stage of delinquency to the next. The rate for early-stage delinquencies – defined as 30 to 59 days past due – was 2 percent in December 2018, down from 2.4 percent in December 2017. The share of mortgages that were 60 to 89 days past due in December 2018 was 0.7 percent, down from 0.8 percent in December 2017. The serious delinquency rate – defined as 90 days or more past due, including loans in foreclosure – was 1.5 percent in December 2018, down from 2.1 percent in December 2017. The serious delinquency rate has been steady at 1.5 percent since August 2018 – the lowest level for any month since March 2007 when it was also 1.5 percent. Since early-stage delinquencies can be volatile, CoreLogic also analyzes transition rates. The share of mortgages that transitioned from current to 30 days past due was 0.9 percent in December 2018, down from 1.2 percent in December 2017. By comparison, in January 2007, just before the start of the financial crisis, the current-to-30-day transition rate was 1.2 percent, while it peaked in November 2008 at 2 percent. "Our latest home equity report found that the average homeowner saw a $9,700 increase in their equity during 2018," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. "With additional 'skin in the game,' rising equity reduces the chances of a foreclosure, helping to push the foreclosure rate down to its lowest level since at least 2000." Since the beginning of 2018, the nation's overall delinquency rate has fallen to pre-housing crisis levels, not seen since early 2006. However, several metropolitan areas in Florida, Georgia and North Carolina are still struggling to recover from natural disasters that impacted those areas. In December 2018, 10 out of the 12 metropolitan areas that logged increases in their serious delinquency rate were located in the Southeast, with the largest gains occurring in the Panama City, Florida metropolitan area. "On a national basis, income and home-price growth continue to support strong loan performance," said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "Although things look good across most of the nation, areas that were impacted by hurricanes and other natural hazards are experiencing a sharp increase in the numbers of mortgages moving into 60-day delinquency or worse. One specific example is Panama City, Florida, which was devastated by Hurricane Michael, where 60-day delinquencies rose to 3.5 percent in December." The next CoreLogic Loan Performance Insights Report will be released on April 9, 2019, featuring data for January 2019. For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog: www.corelogic.com/insights. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider. The company's combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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CoreLogic Reports U.S. Overall Delinquency and Foreclosure Rates Are Lowest for November Since at Least 2000
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity Drops to 13-Year Low in 2018
Foreclosure Starts Spike Annually in Texas, Michigan and Florida; Highest Foreclosure Rates in Metropolitan Statistical Areas Along East Coast IRVINE, Calif. – Jan. 17, 2019 – ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database, today released its Year-End 2018 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report, which shows foreclosure filings — default notices, scheduled auctions and bank repossessions — were reported on 624,753 U.S. properties in 2018, down 8 percent from 2017 and down 78 percent from a peak of nearly 2.9 million in 2010 to the lowest level since 2005. Those 624,753 properties with foreclosure filings in 2018 represented 0.47 percent of all U.S. housing units, down from 0.51 percent in 2017 and down from a peak of 2.23 percent in 2010 to the lowest level since 2005. 2018 Year-End Historical Foreclosure Activity & Rates ATTOM's year-end foreclosure report provides a unique count of properties with a foreclosure filing during the year based on publicly recorded and published foreclosure filings collected in more than 2,500 counties nationwide, with address-level data on more than 23 million foreclosure filings historically also available for license or customized reporting. See full methodology below. The report also includes new data for December 2018, when there were 52,069 U.S. properties with foreclosure filings, down 2 percent from the previous month and down 19 percent from a year ago — the 6th consecutive month with a year-over-year decrease in foreclosure activity. "Plummeting foreclosure completions combined with consistently falling foreclosure timelines in 2018 provide evidence that most of the distress from the last housing crisis has now been cleaned up," said Todd Teta, Chief Product Officer. "But there was also some evidence of distress gradually returning to the housing market in 2018, with foreclosure starts increasing from the previous year in more than one-third of all state and local housing markets. "Some of that distress was driven by natural disasters, most notably in Houston, where foreclosure starts increased 61 percent," Teta continued. "But natural disasters do not explain the increase in markets such as Detroit, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Milwaukee and Austin — all of which posted double-digit percentage increases in foreclosure starts in 2018." Bank repossessions decrease 78 percent since their peak in 2010 Lenders repossessed 230,305 properties through foreclosure (REO) in 2018, down 21 percent from 2017 and down 78 percent from a peak of 1,050,500 in 2010 to the lowest level as far back as data is available — 2006. While completed foreclosures (REOs) are on the decline, California and Florida combined have totaled nearly 1.5 million over the last 10 years. States to lead the nation in REOs also include Michigan (327,783), Texas (313,930), Georgia (299,394) and Illinois (303,404). Counter to the national trend, five states posted a year-over-year increase in REOs, led by New Mexico (up 20 percent); North Dakota (up 15 percent); Alaska (up 8 percent); Connecticut (up 5 percent); and Maine (up 5 percent). Metropolitan statistical areas with a population greater than 200,000 that saw a year-over-year increase in REOs included Flint, Michigan (up 161 percent), Beaumont, Texas (up 63 percent), Albuquerque, New Mexico (up 27 percent), Greeley, Colorado (up 24 percent) and Houston, Texas (up 17 percent). Foreclosure starts at new record low nationwide, increase in 18 states Lenders started the foreclosure process on 369,170 U.S. properties in 2018, down 6 percent from 2017 and down 83 percent from a peak of 2,139,005 in 2009 to a new all-time low going back as far as foreclosure start data is available — 2006. States that saw the biggest decline in foreclosure starts from last year included Rhode Island (down 39 percent); Hawaii (down 26 percent); North Carolina (down 24 percent); Washington (down 24 percent); and Connecticut (down 23 percent). Those metropolitan statistical areas that all saw a large decline in foreclosure starts from last year included Salinas, California (down 49 percent; San Luis Obispo (down 44 percent); Tyler, Texas (down 42 percent); Durham, North Carolina (down 40 percent); and Portland, Oregon (down 32 percent). Counter to the national trend, 18 states posted year-over-year increases in foreclosure starts in 2018, including Minnesota (up 29 percent); Texas (up 15 percent); Michigan (up 15 percent); Florida (up 13 percent); Louisiana (up 5 percent); and Delaware (up 2 percent). New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland post top state foreclosure rates in 2018 States with the highest foreclosure rates in 2018 were New Jersey (1.33 percent of housing units with a foreclosure filing); Delaware (.96 percent); Maryland (0.86 percent); Illinois (0.74 percent); and Connecticut (0.72 percent). New Jersey has held the top spot since 2015. Rounding out the top 10 states with the highest foreclosure rates were Florida (0.71 percent); South Carolina (0.63 percent); Ohio (0.63 percent); Nevada (0.60 percent); and New Mexico (0.57 percent). Atlantic City, Trenton, Flint post top metro foreclosure rates in 2018 Among 219 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000, those with the highest foreclosure rates in 2018 were Atlantic City, New Jersey (2.37 percent of housing units with a foreclosure filing); Trenton, New Jersey (1.56 percent); Flint, Michigan (1.16 percent); Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (1.06 percent); Peoria, Illinois (1.03 percent); Cleveland, Ohio (1.00 percent); and Columbia, South Carolina (0.95 percent). Rounding out the top 10 were Lakeland, Florida (0.95 percent); Baltimore, Maryland (0.89 percent); and Jacksonville, Florida (0.89 percent). Average time to foreclose declines annually for fourth consecutive quarter U.S. properties foreclosed in the fourth quarter of 2018 had been in the foreclosure process an average of 811 days, a 14 percent jump from the previous quarter but still down 21 percent decrease from a year ago — the fourth consecutive quarter with a year-over-year decline. 2018 Year-End Avg Days to Complete Foreclosure States with the longest average time to foreclose in Q4 2018 were Hawaii (1,429 days); Florida (1,311 days); Indiana (1,214 days); Arizona (1,183 days) and New Jersey (1,162 days). Among 499 counties nationwide with sufficient data, those with the longest average time to foreclose in Q4 2018 were Marion County (Indianapolis), Indiana (2,521 days); York County, Pennsylvania (2,432 days); Honolulu County, Hawaii (2,152 days); Dauphin County, Pennsylvania (2,054 days); Queens County, New York (2,046 days) and Denton County, Texas (1,961 days). About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, APIs, market trends, marketing lists, match & append and more.
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CoreLogic Loan Performance Insights Find Delinquency Rates in October Dropped to the Lowest Level in at Least 18 Years
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Q3 2018 Foreclosure Activity Down 8 Percent From Year Ago to Lowest Level Since Q4 2005
Average Time to Foreclose Drops to Two-Year Low; Foreclosure Starts Up From Year Ago in 36 Percent of Local Markets; FHA Foreclosure Rates for 2014 and 2015 Vintages Above Long-Term Average IRVINE, Calif. – Oct. 11, 2018 — ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database, today released its Q3 2018 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report™, which shows a total of 177,146 U.S. properties with foreclosure filings — default notices, scheduled auctions or bank repossessions — in the third quarter, down 6 percent from the previous quarter and down 8 percent from a year ago to the lowest level since Q4 2005 — a nearly 13-year low. U.S. foreclosure activity in Q3 2018 was 36 percent below the pre-recession average of 278,912 properties with foreclosure filings per quarter between Q1 2006 and Q3 2007 — the eighth consecutive quarter where U.S. foreclosure activity has registered below the pre-recession average. "A decade after poorly underwritten mortgages triggered a housing market crash, it's clear that the foreclosure risk associated with those problem mortgages has faded — average foreclosure timelines have dropped to a two-year low, and the share of foreclosures tied to 2004-to-2008 loans has dropped well below 50 percent," said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president at ATTOM Data Solutions. "The biggest foreclosure risk in today's housing market comes from natural disaster events such as the twin hurricanes of a year ago. Foreclosure starts spiked in the third quarter in many local markets impacted by those hurricanes. Secondarily, we are seeing relatively modest — but more widespread — foreclosure risk associated with FHA loans originated in 2014 and 2015." Foreclosure starts down nationwide, up in 36 percent of local markets Lenders started the foreclosure process on 91,849 U.S. properties in Q3 2018, down 6 percent from the previous quarter and down 3 percent from a year ago — the 13th consecutive quarter with a year-over-year decrease in foreclosure starts. Counter to the national trend, 15 states posted year-over-year increases in foreclosure starts in Q3 2018, including Florida (up 25 percent); Texas (up 3 percent); Maryland (up 13 percent); Michigan (up 32 percent); and Missouri (up 10 percent). Also counter to the national trend, 79 of 219 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report (36 percent) posted a year-over-year increase in foreclosure starts in Q3 2018, including Los Angeles, California (up 2 percent); Houston, Texas (up 51 percent); Washington, D.C. (up 2 percent); Miami, Florida (up 29 percent); and Detroit, Michigan (up 65 percent). Other markets with at least 1 million people and a year-over-year increase of at least 15 percent in foreclosure starts in Q3 2018 were Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; Tampa-St. Petersburg, Florida; St. Louis, Missouri; Orlando, Florida; Las Vegas, Nevada; Austin, Texas, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Jacksonville, Florida; and Grand Rapids, Wyoming. FHA foreclosure rates for 2014 and 2015 vintages above long-term average FHA foreclosure rates for 2014 and 2015 loan vintages registered above the long-term average foreclosure rate for FHA loans, the only two post-recession vintages (2010 and later) above the long-term average. FHA loans originated in 2014 had the highest foreclosure rate of any post-recession loan vintage nationwide, as well as in 31 states and in 63 of 115 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed (55 percent), including New York, Chicago, Dallas-Fort Worth, Philadelphia and Houston. FHA loans originated in 2015 had the highest foreclosure rate of any post-recession loan vintage in 10 states and in 21 of 115 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed (18 percent), including Atlanta, Miami, San Antonio, Oklahoma City and Memphis. Highest foreclosure rates in New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland Nationwide one in every 757 properties had a foreclosure filing in Q3 2018. States with the highest foreclosure rates in Q3 2018 were New Jersey (one in every 267 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Delaware (one in every 315); Maryland (one in every 379); Florida (one in every 449); and Nevada (one in every 472). Among 219 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report, those with the highest foreclosure rates in Q3 2018 were Atlantic City, New Jersey (one in every 152 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Trenton, New Jersey (one in every 236); Fayetteville, North Carolina (one in every 253); Peoria, Illinois (one in every 299); and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (one in every 326). Bank repossessions drop to record low nationwide, up in 17 states Lenders repossessed 51,459 U.S. properties through foreclosure (REO) in Q3 2018, down 24 percent from the previous quarter and down 8 percent from a year ago to the lowest level since ATTOM began tracking in Q2 2005. Counter to the national trend, the District of Columbia and 17 states posted year-over-year increases in REO activity in Q3 2018, including New Jersey (up 4 percent); Texas (up 21 percent); New York (up 3 percent); Georgia (up 56 percent); and Missouri (up 27 percent). Average time to foreclose drops to two-year low Properties foreclosed in Q3 2018 had been in the foreclosure process an average of 713 days, down from 720 days in the previous quarter and down from 899 days in Q3 2017 to the lowest level since Q2 2016 — a two-year low. States with the longest average foreclosure timelines for homes foreclosed in Q3 2018 were Hawaii (1,491 days); Indiana (1,295 days); Florida (1,177 days); Utah (1,170 days); New Jersey (1,137 days); and New York (1,092 days). States with the shortest average foreclosure timelines for homes foreclosed in Q3 2018 were Virginia (179 days); Mississippi (209 days); New Hampshire (216 days); Alaska (237 days); and Nebraska (240 days). About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, APIs, market trends, marketing lists, match & append and more.
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CoreLogic Loan Performance Insights Find Overall U.S. Mortgage Delinquency and Foreclosure Rates Lowest for June in 12 Years
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Foreclosure Starts Increase in 44 Percent of U.S. Markets in July 2018
July the Third Consecutive Month with an Annual Increase in 15 Percent of Markets; Atlantic City, Peoria, Fayetteville, North Carolina Post Top Metro Foreclosure Rates IRVINE, Calif. – Aug. 21, 2018 — ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database, today released its July 2018 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report, which shows that foreclosure starts increased from a year ago in 96 of the 219 metropolitan statistical areas (44 percent) analyzed in the report. A total of 30,187 U.S. properties started the foreclosure process for the first time in July, up 1 percent from the previous month and up less than 1 percent from a year ago — the first year-over-year increase in foreclosure starts nationwide following 36 consecutive months of year-over-year decreases. Twenty-one states posted a year-over-year increase in foreclosure starts in July, including Florida (up 35 percent); California (up 3 percent); Texas (up 7 percent); Illinois (up 7 percent); and Ohio (up 2 percent). Metro areas posting year-over-year increases in foreclosure starts in July included Los Angeles, California (up 20 percent); Houston, Texas (up 76 percent); Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (up 10 percent); Miami, Florida (up 29 percent); and San Francisco, California (up 10 percent). "The increase in foreclosure starts is not just a one-month anomaly in many local markets given that July represented the third consecutive month with a year-over-year increase in 33 metro areas, including Los Angeles, Miami, Houston, Detroit, San Diego and Austin," said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president with ATTOM Data Solutions. "Gradually loosening lending standards over the past few years have introduced a modicum of risk back into the housing market, and that additional risk is resulting in rising foreclosure starts in a diverse set of markets across the country. Most susceptible to rising foreclosure starts are affordability-challenged markets where homebuyers are more financially stretched and markets with some type of trigger event such as a natural disaster or large-scale layoffs." Atlantic City, Peoria, Fayetteville, North Carolina post top metro foreclosure rates Nationwide, one in every 2,086 U.S. housing units had a foreclosure filing in July. States with the highest foreclosure rates in July were New Jersey (one in every 723 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Delaware (one in every 841); Maryland (one in every 1,038); Florida (one in every 1,180); and Illinois (one in every 1,277). Among the 219 metropolitan statistical areas with at least 200,000 people, those with the highest foreclosure rates in July were Atlantic City, New Jersey (one in every 448 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Peoria, Illinois (one in every 622); Fayetteville, North Carolina (one in every 683); Trenton, New Jersey (one in every 703); and Philadelphia (one in every 851). About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, APIs, market trends, marketing lists, match & append and more.
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362,275 U.S. Properties with Foreclosure Filings in First Six Months of 2018, Down 15 Percent From a Year Ago
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CoreLogic Loan Performance Insights Finds Declining Mortgage Delinquency Rates for April as States Impacted by 2017 Hurricanes Continue to Recover
CoreLogic, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its monthly Loan Performance Insights Report. The report shows that, nationally, 4.2 percent of mortgages were in some stage of delinquency (30 days or more past due, including those in foreclosure) in April 2018, representing a 0.6 percentage point decline in the overall delinquency rate compared with April 2017, when it was 4.8 percent. As of April 2018, the foreclosure inventory rate – which measures the share of mortgages in some stage of the foreclosure process – was 0.6 percent, down 0.1 percentage points from 0.7 percent in April 2017. Since August 2017, the foreclosure inventory rate has been steady at 0.6 percent, the lowest level since June 2007, when it was also 0.6 percent. The April 2018 foreclosure inventory rate was the lowest for that month in 11 years; it was also 0.6 percent in April 2007. Measuring early-stage delinquency rates is important for analyzing the health of the mortgage market. To monitor mortgage performance comprehensively, CoreLogic examines all stages of delinquency, as well as transition rates, which indicate the percentage of mortgages moving from one stage of delinquency to the next. The rate for early-stage delinquencies – defined as 30 to 59 days past due – was 1.8 percent in April 2018, down from 2.2 in April 2017. The share of mortgages that were 60 to 89 days past due in April 2018 was 0.6 percent, unchanged from April 2017. The serious delinquency rate – defined as 90 days or more past due, including loans in foreclosure – was 1.9 percent in April 2018, down from 2.0 percent in April 2017. The April 2018 serious delinquency rate was the lowest for that month since 2007 when it was 1.6 percent. "Job growth, home-price appreciation, and full-doc underwriting have pushed delinquency and foreclosure rates to the lowest point in more than a decade," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. "The latest CoreLogic Home Price Index report revealed the annual national home price growth was 7.1 percent in May, the fastest annual growth in four years. U.S. employers have also continued to employ more individuals, as employment rose by 2.4 million throughout the last 12 months with 213,000 jobs added last month alone. Together, this heightened financial stability is pushing delinquency and foreclosure rates to record lows." Since early-stage delinquencies can be volatile, CoreLogic also analyzes transition rates. The share of mortgages that transitioned from current to 30 days past due was 0.8 percent in April 2018, down from 1.2 percent in April 2017. By comparison, in January 2007, just before the start of the financial crisis, the current- to 30-day transition rate was 1.2 percent, while it peaked in November 2008 at 2 percent. As a result of the 2017 hurricane season, Florida and Texas are the only states showing significant gains in 90-day delinquency rates. According to the CoreLogic Storm Surge Report, Florida has the most densely populated and longest coastal area and thus the most exposure to storm surge flooding (compared to the 19 states analyzed in the report) with more than 2.7 million at-risk homes across five risk categories (Category 1 – Category 5 storms). Louisiana ranks second with more than 817,000 at-risk homes, while Texas ranks third with more than 543,000 at-risk homes. A major storm did not strike Louisiana in 2017, but Florida and Texas are still recovering from Hurricanes Irma and Harvey, respectively. "Delinquency rates are nearing historic lows, except in areas impacted by extreme weather over the past 18 months, reflecting a long period of strict underwriting practices and improved economic conditions," said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "Last year's hurricanes and wildfires continue to affect today's default rates. The percent of loans 90 days or more delinquent or in foreclosure are more than double what they were before last autumn's hurricanes in Houston, Texas and Naples, Florida. The 90-day-plus delinquent or in-foreclosure rate has also quadrupled in Puerto Rico." For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider. The company's combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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CoreLogic Reports Declining Foreclosure Rates in February, Signaling a Strong Economy
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity Decreases 19 Percent in Q1 2018 to Stay Below Pre-Recession Levels for Sixth Consecutive Quarter
But Foreclosure Starts Up From Year Ago in 37 Percent of Local Markets; Foreclosure Rate on 2014 Vintage FHA Loans Rises Above Long-Term Average; Average Foreclosure Timeline Drops 23 Percent From Previous Quarter IRVINE, Calif. – April 12, 2018 — ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database, today released its Q1 2018 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report, which shows a total of 189,870 U.S. properties with a foreclosure filing during the first quarter of 2018, up 4 percent from the previous quarter but still down 19 percent from a year ago and 32 percent below the pre-recession average of 278,912 per quarter from Q1 2006 to Q3 2007 — the sixth consecutive quarter where U.S. foreclosure activity has been below its pre-recession quarterly average. The report also shows a total of 74,341 U.S. properties with foreclosure filings in March 2018, up 21 percent from an all-time low in the previous month but still down 11 percent from a year ago — the 30th consecutive month with a year-over-year decrease in U.S. foreclosure activity. An analysis of foreclosure activity by loan origination year shows that 45 percent of all properties in foreclosure as of the end of the first quarter were tied to loans originated between 2004 and 2008, down from 50 percent as of the end of Q4 2017 and down from 51 percent as of the end of Q1 2017. "Less than half of all active foreclosures are now tied to loans originated during the last housing bubble, one of several data milestones in this report showing that the U.S. housing market has mostly cleared out the backlog of bad loans that triggered the housing and financial crisis nearly a decade ago," said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president at ATTOM Data Solutions. "Meanwhile we are beginning to see early signs that some post-recession loan vintages are defaulting at a slightly elevated rate, a sign that some loosening of lending standards has occurred in recent years. Consequently, foreclosure starts are trending higher compared to a year ago in an increasing number of local markets — some of which are a bit surprising given the overall strength of housing in those markets." Foreclosure starts increase in 37 percent of local markets A total of 92,703 U.S. properties started the foreclosure process in Q1 2018, up 8 percent from the previous quarter but still down 10 percent from a year ago — the 11th consecutive quarter with a year-over-year decrease in U.S. foreclosure starts. Counter to the national trend, 82 of 219 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report (37 percent) posted year-over-year increases in foreclosure starts in the first quarter, up from 20 percent of markets posting year-over-year increases in foreclosure starts in Q1 2017. Twenty-three of 53 metropolitan statistical areas with at least 1 million people (43 percent) posted a year-over-year increase in foreclosure starts in the first quarter, led by Indianapolis, Indiana (up 148 percent); Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota (up 64 percent); Louisville, Kentucky (up 36 percent); Austin, Texas (up 30 percent); and Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (up 23 percent). Other markets posting double-digit percentage increases in foreclosure starts in Q1 2018 compared to a year ago were Milwaukee (up 21 percent) Dallas-Fort Worth (up 20 percent), San Antonio (up 17 percent), Las Vegas (up 15 percent), Birmingham, Alabama (up 13 percent), Charlotte (up 12 percent), Pittsburgh (up 12 percent), Raleigh (up 10 percent) and Nashville (up 10 percent). Bank repossessions down in 46 states and DC Lenders repossessed 65,413 U.S. properties through foreclosure (REO) in Q1 2018, down 2 percent from the previous quarter and down 28 percent from a year ago — the eighth consecutive quarter with a year-over-year decrease in U.S. REOs. Along with the District of Columbia, 46 states posted year-over-year decreases in REOs in the first quarter, including Florida (down 33 percent); New Jersey (down 24 percent); Texas (down 20 percent); Illinois (down 41 percent); California (down 36 percent); and Maryland (down 34 percent). "Maryland's housing market continues its stride to recovery, posting successive growth indicators since 2012," said Bernice E. Mensah, director of housing and economic research at the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development. "The state's tightening housing market due in large part to sustained low unemployment rate, rising home prices, shrinking inventory of homes along with growing median income has helped turn the tide on foreclosure activity to its lowest level since Q3 2012. This has encouraged lenders to speed up their foreclosure processing to take advantage of growing home prices and clear up the foreclosure pipeline." Foreclosure activity below pre-recession levels in 56 percent of local markets Twenty-two states posted first quarter foreclosure activity totals below their pre-recession averages, led by Colorado, Michigan, California, Nevada and Georgia. Twenty-eight states and the District of Columbia posted first quarter foreclosure activity totals above their pre-recession averages, including New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, North Carolina and Maryland. First quarter foreclosure activity registered below pre-recession levels in 122 of the 219 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report (56 percent), including Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas-Fort Worth, Houston, and Miami. First quarter foreclosure activity continued to register above pre-recession levels in 97 of the 219 metro areas analyzed in the report (44 percent), including New York-Northern New Jersey, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., Baltimore and Virginia Beach, Virginia. Atlantic City, Trenton, Philadelphia post highest metro foreclosure rates in Q1 2018 Nationwide one in every 706 U.S. housing units had a foreclosure filing in the first quarter of 2018. States with the highest foreclosure rates in the first quarter were New Jersey (one in 233 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Delaware (one in 317); Maryland (one in 385); Illinois (one in 425); and South Carolina (one in 458). Among 219 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000, those with the highest foreclosure rates in Q1 2018 were Atlantic City, New Jersey (one in every 113 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Trenton, New Jersey (one in 198); Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (one in 284); Columbia, South Carolina (one in 311); and Fayetteville, North Carolina (one in 321). Along with Philadelphia, other major metros with a population of at least 1 million and foreclosure rates in the top 25 highest nationwide included Cleveland at No. 6, Baltimore at No. 10, Chicago at No. 11, Riverside-San Bernardino in Southern California at No. 20, New York-Northern New Jersey at No. 22, Birmingham, Alabama at No. 23, and Las Vegas at No. 25. Foreclosure rate on 2014 vintage FHA loans above historical average The report also broke down percentage of open loans in foreclosure by loan origination year (vintage). As of the end of the first quarter of 2018, 0.48 percent of all open U.S. loans secured by real property were actively in foreclosure across all loan vintages. Loan vintages with the highest share of open loans in foreclosure were 2006 and 2007 (both with 1.52 percent) followed by 2005 (1.13 percent), 2008 (1.03 percent), and 2004 (0.85 percent). Among post-recession loan vintages originated in 2010 or later the highest share of open loans in foreclosure was for loans originated in 2014 (0.41 percent). The report also analyzed the share of open loans backed by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) in foreclosure by loan vintage. Nationwide for all loan vintages, 0.96 percent of open FHA-backed loans secured by real property were in foreclosure, with the 2014 loan vintage posting the highest share in foreclosure of any post-recession loan vintage (1.28 percent). The 2014 loan vintage had the highest share of open FHA-backed loans in foreclosure among post-recession vintages in 54 of 109 (50 percent) metropolitan statistical areas with at least 10,000 active FHA-backed loans as of the end of the first quarter, including in Chicago, Dallas, Atlanta, Philadelphia and Phoenix. Average foreclosure timeline drops 23 percent in first quarter Properties foreclosed in the first quarter of 2018 had been in the foreclosure process an average of 791 days, down 23 percent from an average 1,027 days for properties foreclosed in the fourth quarter of 2017 and down 3 percent from an average of 814 days for properties foreclosed in the first quarter of 2017. States with the longest average foreclosure timeline for properties foreclosed in Q1 2018 were Nevada (1,765 days), Hawaii (1,584 days), Florida (1,247 days), Indiana (1,245 days), and New Jersey (1,182 days). States with the shortest average time to foreclose in Q1 2018 were Virginia (193 days), Mississippi (212 days), Wyoming (252 days), West Virginia (270 days), and Arkansas (282 days). About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions blends property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties multi-sourced from more than 3,000 U.S. counties. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. With more than 29.6 billion rows of transactional-level data and more than 7,200 discrete data attributes, the 9TB ATTOM data warehouse powers real estate transparency for innovators, entrepreneurs, disrupters, developers, marketers, policymakers, and analysts through flexible delivery solutions, including bulk file licenses, APIs and customized reports.
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CoreLogic Reports Early-Stage Delinquencies Increased Slightly in December But Serious Delinquency and Foreclosure Inventory Rates Declined Year Over Year
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity Drops to 12-Year Low in 2017
But New York Foreclosure Auctions, New Jersey REOs Both at 11-Year High; Biggest Backlogs of Legacy Foreclosures in New York, New Jersey, Florida IRVINE, Calif. – Jan. 18, 2018 – ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's largest multi-sourced property database, today released its Year-End 2017 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report, which shows foreclosure filings — default notices, scheduled auctions and bank repossessions — were reported on 676,535 U.S. properties in 2017, down 27 percent from 2016 and down 76 percent from a peak of nearly 2.9 million in 2010 to the lowest level since 2005. Those 676,535 properties with foreclosure filings in 2017 represented 0.51 percent of all U.S. housing units, down from 0.70 percent in 2016 and down from a peak of 2.23 percent in 2010 to the lowest level since 2005. ATTOM's year-end foreclosure report is a count of unique properties with a foreclosure filing during the year based on publicly recorded and published foreclosure filings collected in more than 2,500 counties nationwide, with address-level data on more than 23 million foreclosure filings historically also available for license or customized reporting. See full methodology below. The report also includes new data for December 2017, when there were 64,651 U.S. properties with foreclosure filings, up 1 percent from the previous month but still down 25 percent from a year ago — the 27th consecutive month with a year-over-year decrease in foreclosure activity. "Thanks to a housing boom driven primarily by a scarcity of supply, which has helped to limit home purchases to the most highly qualified — and low-risk — borrowers, the U.S. housing market has the luxury of playing a version of foreclosure limbo in which it searches for how low foreclosures can go," said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president at ATTOM Data Solutions. "There are a few notable local market exceptions playing a different version of foreclosure limbo in which a backlog of legacy foreclosure activity left over from the last housing crisis is still winding its way through a labyrinthine foreclosure process, resulting in incongruous jumps in various stages of foreclosure activity in markets such as New York, New Jersey and DC." Foreclosure starts at new record low nationwide, increase in DC and five states Lenders started the foreclosure process on 383,701 U.S. properties in 2017, down 20 percent from 2016 and down 82 percent from a peak of 2,139,005 in 2009 to a new all-time low going back as far as foreclosure start data is available — 2006. "Across Southern California, while foreclosures have maintained historically low levels during much of 2017, housing affordability has become the concern that has many watching the market for a potential shift in the near future," said Michael Mahon, president of First Team Real Estate, covering the Southern California market, which also posted an 11-year low in foreclosure starts in 2017. "With wage growth not meeting equity growth across many Southern California markets — coupled with rising interest rates — there are some concerns that foreclosures could be on the rise in 2018." Counter to the national trend, the District of Columbia and five states posted year-over-year increases in foreclosure starts in 2017, including Illinois (up 2 percent); Oklahoma (up 23 percent); Louisiana (up 2 percent); DC (up 54 percent); West Virginia (up 32 percent); and Vermont (up 27 percent). New York foreclosure auctions at 11-year high, counter to 11-year low nationwide A total of 318,165 U.S. properties were scheduled for public foreclosure auction (the same as a foreclosure start in some states) in 2017, down 27 percent from 2016 and down from a peak of 1,600,593 in 2010 to a new all-time low going back as far as foreclosure auction data is available — 2006. "The data for the Seattle market tells a very big story, and that is we are not seeing a housing bubble forming," said Matthew Gardner, chief economist at Windermere Real Estate, covering the Seattle market, where scheduled foreclosure auctions in 2017 dropped 47 percent to an 11-year low. "With foreclosure rates at less than 0.4 percent of total housing units, the market is remarkably stable. That said, we are certainly suffering from serious affordability issues, but this is not translating into defaults on loans." The District of Columbia and seven states posted a year-over-year increase in scheduled foreclosure auctions in 2017, including New York (up 9 percent to the highest level since 2006); Oklahoma (up 4 percent); Connecticut (up 7 percent); and Maine (up 2 percent). New Jersey bank repossessions at 11-year high, counter to 11-year low nationwide Lenders repossessed 291,579 properties through foreclosure (REO) in 2017, down 23 percent from 2016 and down 72 percent from a peak of 1,050,500 in 2010 to the lowest level since 2006 — an 11-year low. Counter to the national trend, the District of Columbia and seven states posted a year-over-year increase in REOs in 217, led by New Jersey (19 percent increase to the highest level since 2006); Delaware (up 16 percent); Montana (up 12 percent); DC (up 10 percent); and Wyoming (up 10 percent). New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland post top state foreclosure rates in 2017 States with the highest foreclosure rates in 2017 were New Jersey (1.61 percent of housing units with a foreclosure filing); Delaware (1.13 percent); Maryland (0.95 percent); Illinois (0.86 percent); and Connecticut (0.78 percent). Rounding out the top 10 states with the highest foreclosure rates were Florida (0.72 percent); South Carolina (0.70 percent); Ohio (0.70 percent); Nevada (0.67 percent); and New Mexico (0.63 percent). Atlantic City, Trenton, Philadelphia post top metro foreclosure rates in 2017 Among 217 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000, those with the highest foreclosure rates in 2017 were Atlantic City, New Jersey (2.72 percent of housing units with a foreclosure filing); Trenton, New Jersey (1.68 percent); Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (1.26 percent); Fayetteville, North Carolina (1.17 percent); and Rockford, Illinois (1.14 percent). Rounding out the top 10 were Cleveland, Ohio (1.06 percent); Columbia, South Carolina (1.05 percent); Baltimore, Maryland (1.05 percent); Chicago, Illinois (1.04 percent); and Albuquerque, New Mexico (0.99 percent). Average time to foreclose jumps above 1,000 days nationwide U.S. properties foreclosed in the fourth quarter of 2017 had been in the foreclosure process an average of 1,027 days, a 14 percent jump from the previous quarter and a 28 percent increase from a year ago to the longest since ATTOM began tracking average foreclosure timelines in Q1 2007. States with the longest average time to foreclose in Q4 2017 were Indiana (2,370 days); Nevada (1,933 days); Florida (1,493 days); New Jersey (1,298 days) and Georgia (1,263 days). Among 233 counties nationwide with sufficient data, those with the longest average time to foreclose in Q4 2017 were Queens County, New York; Marion County (Indianapolis), Indiana (2,810 days); Orange County (Orlando), Florida (2,109 days); Henry County (Atlanta), Georgia (2,075 days); and Cherokee County (Atlanta), Georgia (1,988 days). Biggest backlogs of legacy foreclosures in New York, New Jersey, Florida Nationwide, 50 percent of all loans actively in foreclosure as of the end of 2017 were originated between 2004 and 2008 — down from 55 percent a year ago. States with the highest number of legacy foreclosures on loans originated between 2004 and 2008 were New York (25,886), New Jersey (20,172), Florida (19,494), California (9,847), and Illinois (8,732). Legacy foreclosures on loans originated between 2004 and 2008 represented 74 percent of all active loans in foreclosure in the District of Columbia, higher than any state with at least 100 active loans in foreclosure, followed by Hawaii (67 percent), New Jersey (58 percent), Massachusetts (58 percent), Florida (55 percent), and Nevada (55 percent). Counties with the highest total number of legacy foreclosures were Nassau County (Long Island), New York (6,782); Cook County (Chicago), Illinois (5,478); Kings County (Brooklyn), New York (4,677); Miami-Dade County, Florida (3,804); and Suffolk County (Long Island), New York (3,417). Report methodology The ATTOM Data Solutions Year-End U.S. Foreclosure Market Report provides a count of the total number of properties with at least one foreclosure filing entered into the ATTOM Data Warehouse during the year. Some foreclosure filings entered into the database during the year may have been recorded in the previous year. Data is collected from more than 2,500 counties nationwide, and those counties account for more than 90 percent of the U.S. population. ATTOM's report incorporates documents filed in all three phases of foreclosure: Default — Notice of Default (NOD) and Lis Pendens (LIS); Auction — Notice of Trustee Sale and Notice of Foreclosure Sale (NTS and NFS); and Real Estate Owned, or REO properties (that have been foreclosed on and repurchased by a bank). For the annual and quarterly reports, if more than one type of foreclosure document is received for a property during the year or quarter, only the most recent filing is counted in the report. The annual, quarterly and monthly reports all check if the same type of document was filed against a property previously. If so, and if that previous filing occurred within the estimated foreclosure timeframe for the state where the property is located, the report does not count the property in the current year, quarter or month. About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions is the curator of the ATTOM Data Warehouse, a multi-sourced national property database that blends property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, health hazards, neighborhood characteristics and other property characteristic data for more than 150 million U.S. residential and commercial properties. The ATTOM Data Warehouse delivers actionable data to businesses, consumers, government agencies, universities, policymakers and the media in multiple ways, including bulk file licenses, APIs and customized reports.
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U.S. Distressed Sales Share Drops to 10-Year Low in Q3 2017
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Vacant Property Rate Increases From a Year Ago in 54 Percent of U.S. Local Housing Markets in Q3 2017
Vacant "Zombie" Pre-Foreclosures Down 22 Percent From Year Ago to New Low; Flint, Youngstown, Beaumont, Detroit, Mobile Top List of Most Vacant Metro Areas; Three Out of Four Vacant Residential Properties Nationwide Are Investment Homes IRVINE, Calif. – Oct. 26, 2017 — ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's largest multi-sourced property database, today released its 2017 U.S. Residential Vacant Property and Zombie Foreclosure Report, which shows nearly 1.4 million (1,367,793) U.S. residential properties (1 to 4 units) were vacant as of the end of the third quarter of 2017 — representing 1.58 percent of all U.S. residential properties. The 1.58 percent vacant property rate nationwide decreased slightly from 1.63 percent a year ago, but vacant property rates increased from a year ago in 81 of the 149 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report (54 percent), including Chicago, New York, St. Louis, Baltimore and Phoenix. The report analyzes public record tax, deed and mortgage data collected by ATTOM Data Solutions — including foreclosure status, equity, and owner-occupancy status — matched against monthly updated vacant property data from the U.S. Postal Service. Vacant property data is available at the aggregate and address level for more than 120 million U.S. properties at http://marketinglists.realtytrac.com. The report also shows that the number of vacant "zombie" pre-foreclosure properties — which have started the foreclosure process but have not yet been repossessed by the foreclosing lender — decreased 22 percent from a year ago to 14,312 as of the end of Q3 2017, 67 percent below the peak of 44,030 in Q3 2013. The number of vacant bank-owned properties decreased 48 percent from a year ago to 24,026 as of the end of Q3 2017. "Zombie foreclosures have dwindled dramatically over the last four years as a supply-starved housing has soaked up even some of the most highly distressed properties," said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president at ATTOM Data Solutions. "There are still pockets of the country with high zombie foreclosure rates, and high vacant property rates in general, primarily in the Rust Belt and parts of the Northeast and Southeast — driven in large part by a high share of non-owner occupied vacant properties in those areas. "There is evidence that the ultra-tight inventory environment in some red-hot markets is beginning to ease just a bit, with vacant property rates nudging higher in markets such as San Jose, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Boston and Denver," Blomquist added. Zip codes where one in four residential properties is vacant States with the highest vacancy rates were Mississippi (3.00 percent); Michigan (2.94 percent); Indiana (2.77 percent); Oklahoma (2.73 percent); and Alabama (2.56 percent). Among 149 metropolitan statistical areas with at least 100,000 residential properties (1 to 4 units), those with the highest vacancy rates were Flint, Michigan (6.89 percent); Youngstown, Ohio (4.49 percent); Beaumont-Port Arthur, Texas (3.80 percent); Detroit, Michigan (3.77 percent); and Mobile, Alabama (3.77 percent). Among 405 counties with at least 50,000 residential properties, those with the highest vacancy rates were Baltimore City, Maryland (8.14 percent); Saint Louis City, Missouri (6.97 percent); Beaufort County, South Carolina (6.94 percent); Genesee County, Michigan (6.89 percent); and Wayne County, Michigan (6.76 percent). Among 13,616 U.S. zip codes with at least 1,000 residential properties, those with the highest vacancy rates were led by three zip codes in the city of Gary, Indiana: 46409 (30.26 percent); 46407 (29.62 percent); and 46402 (29.53 percent), followed by 48505 in Flint, Michigan (29.00 percent); and 44507 in Youngstown, Ohio (25.97 percent). 9 percent of zip codes have no vacant residential properties States with the lowest vacancy rates were South Dakota (0.25 percent); Vermont (0.39 percent); New Hampshire (0.42 percent); North Dakota (0.69 percent); and Colorado (0.69 percent). Among 149 metropolitan statistical areas with at least 100,000 residential properties, those with the lowest vacancy rates were San Jose, California (0.23 percent); Fort Collins, Colorado (0.24 percent); Lancaster, Pennsylvania (0.26 percent); Manchester, New Hampshire (0.31 percent); and Provo, Utah (0.34 percent). "The low vacant property rates in the Seattle region are good for landlords and sellers but not so good for buyers or renters," said Matthew Gardner, chief economist at Windermere Real Estate, covering the Seattle market, where the 0.9 percent vacant property rate was well below the national average and ranked No. 41 lowest among the 149 metro areas analyzed in the report. "It is indicative of the very hot housing market in Seattle and I believe that the percentages could drop even further as we move into 2018." Among 405 counties with at least 50,000 residential properties, those with the lowest vacancy rates were Loudon County, Virginia (0.09 percent); Douglas County, Colorado (0.10 percent); Spotsylvania County, Virginia (0.12 percent); Hays County, Texas (0.12 percent); and Shelby County, Alabama (0.14 percent). Among 13,616 U.S. zip codes with at least 1,000 residential properties, there were 1,282 zip codes with no vacant residential properties, including 28078 in Huntersville, North Carolina; 85383 in Peoria, Arizona; 34110 in Naples, Florida; 33018 in Hialeah, Florida; and 94546 in Castro Valley, California. "As home values and rental rates have continued to escalate across Southern California, vacant property rates have continued to decline across the region," said Michael Mahon, president at First Team Real Estate covering the Southern California market, where 23 zip codes across the 573 zip codes in the six-county region had no vacant residential properties. "With housing affordability becoming an increasing topic of concern, many residential properties are being converted to rental property inventory, in attempt to take advantage of the increasing demand of rental properties within the marketplace." Most zombie foreclosures in New York, New Jersey, Florida, Illinois, Ohio Nationwide a total of 14,312 properties in the foreclosure process were vacant as of the end of Q3 2017, representing 4.18 percent of all properties in foreclosure. States with the most of these vacant "zombie" foreclosures were New York (3,528), New Jersey (2,261), Florida (1,963), Illinois (999), and Ohio (974). Among 149 metropolitan statistical areas with at least 100,000 residential properties (1 to 4 units), those with the most vacant "zombie" foreclosures were New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA (3,106); Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (813), Chicago, Illinois (665), Miami, Florida (571), and Tampa-St. Petersburg, Florida (477). Most vacant REOs in New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Cleveland Nationwide a total of 24,026 bank-owned (REO) residential properties were vacant as of the end of Q3 2017, representing 15.33 percent of all bank-owned properties and down 48 percent from a year ago. States with the most vacant REO properties were Michigan (2,265), Ohio (2,213), Florida (2,087), New Jersey (2,017), and Illinois (1,561). Among 149 metropolitan statistical areas with at least 100,000 residential properties (1 to 4 units), those with the most vacant REO properties were New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA (1,494); Chicago, Illinois (1,375); Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (1,007); Baltimore, Maryland (971); and Cleveland, Ohio (928). 75 percent of vacant properties are non-owner occupied (investment) Nationwide more than 1 million non-owner occupied (investment) residential properties (1,032,851) were vacant, representing 4.30 percent of all non-owner occupied residential properties and unchanged from a year ago. States with the highest vacancy rate for non-owner occupied (investment) properties were Michigan (9.84 percent); Indiana (9.52 percent); Kansas (7.11 percent); Mississippi (6.92 percent); and Alabama (6.83 percent). Among 149 metropolitan statistical areas with at least 100,000 residential properties (1 to 4 units), those with the highest vacancy rate for non-owner occupied (investment) properties were Flint, Michigan (23.64 percent); Youngstown, Ohio (12.01 percent); Detroit, Michigan (11.88 percent); South Bend, Indiana (10.47 percent); and Indianapolis, Indiana (10.46 percent). About ATTOM Data SolutionsATTOM Data Solutions is the curator of the ATTOM Data Warehouse, a multi-sourced national property database that blends property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, health hazards, neighborhood characteristics and other property characteristic data for more than 150 million U.S. residential and commercial properties. The ATTOM Data Warehouse delivers actionable data to businesses, consumers, government agencies, universities, policymakers and the media in multiple ways, including bulk file licenses, APIs and customized reports.
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity Drops to More Than 11-Year Low in Q3 2017
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424,800 U.S. Properties with Foreclosure Filings in First Six Months of 2017, Down 20 Percent from Year Ago
DC Foreclosure Activity Increases 60 Percent From Year Ago, Bucking U.S. Trend; Foreclosure Activity Up in 13 Percent of Metros Including Houston, OKC, Hartford: Q2 Foreclosure Activity Below Pre-Recession Levels in 49 Percent of Metros IRVINE, Calif. – July 20, 2017 — ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's largest multi-sourced property database, today released its Midyear 2017 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report™, which shows a total of 428,400 U.S. properties with foreclosure filings — default notices, scheduled auctions or bank repossessions — in the first six months of 2017, down 20 percent from the same time period a year ago and down 28 percent from the same time period two years ago. Counter to the national trend, eight states and the District of Columbia posted a year-over-year increase in foreclosure activity in the first half of 2017. Foreclosure activity increased 60 percent in the District compared to a year, while states with an increase included New Jersey (up 2 percent); Connecticut (up 3 percent); Louisiana (up 5 percent); and Mississippi (up 11 percent). Also bucking the national trend with increasing foreclosure activity compared to a year ago were 28 of the 217 metro areas (13 percent) analyzed in the report, including Houston, Texas (up 18 percent); Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (up 22 percent); Hartford, Connecticut (up 12 percent); New Orleans, Louisiana (up 4 percent); and Albany, New York (up 2 percent). "With a few local market exceptions, foreclosures have become the unicorns of the housing market: hard to find but highly sought after," said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president with ATTOM Data Solutions. "More than 38 percent of properties sold at foreclosure auction in the first half of this year went to third-party buyers rather than back to the bank — the highest share we've ever seen going back as far as 2000, the earliest this data is available, "Although foreclosures are fading overall, there has been a notable an uptick in foreclosures completed by some nonbank entities — counter to the sharp downward foreclosure trend among big banks and government-backed loans," Blomquist added. "These divergent foreclosure trends are likely the result of the big banks and government agencies selling off distressed loans over the past few years to nonbank entities that are now foreclosing on an increasing volume of that deferred distress." New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland post highest state foreclosure rates Nationwide 0.32 percent of all housing units (one in every 311) had a foreclosure filing in the first half of 2017. States with the highest foreclosure rates in the first half of 2017 were New Jersey (0.99 percent of housing units with a foreclosure filing); Delaware (0.73 percent); Maryland (0.62 percent); Illinois (0.55 percent); and Connecticut (0.50 percent) Other states with first-half foreclosure rates among the 10 highest nationwide were Nevada (0.47 percent); Florida (0.46 percent); South Carolina (0.45 percent); Ohio (0.44 percent); and New Mexico (0.37 percent). Atlantic City, Trenton, Philadelphia, with highest metro foreclosure rates Among 217 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000, those with the highest foreclosure rates in the first half of 2017 were Atlantic City, New Jersey (1.71 percent of housing units with foreclosure filings); Trenton, New Jersey (1.02 percent); Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (0.79 percent); Rockford, Illinois (0.74 percent); and Baltimore, Maryland (0.69 percent). Other metro areas with foreclosure rates ranking among the top 10 highest in the first half of 2017 were Fayetteville, North Carolina (0.69 percent of housing units with a foreclosure filing); Columbia, South Carolina (0.66 percent); Chicago, Illinois (0.65 percent); Peoria, Illinois (0.60 percent); and Reading, Pennsylvania (0.60 percent). Foreclosure starts down nationwide, up in DC and seven states A total of 203,875 U.S. properties started the foreclosure process in the first six months of 2017, down 20 percent from a year ago to the lowest six-month total going back to the second half of 2005, the earliest data available. Counter to the national trend, seven states and the District of Columbia posted year-over-year increases in foreclosure starts: Texas (0.3 percent increase); Illinois (13 percent increase); Connecticut (3 percent increase); Oklahoma (35 percent increase); DC (114 percent increase); West Virginia (5 percent increase); Montana (12 percent increase); North Dakota (14 percent increase). Bank repossessions drop to lowest level since 2014 Lenders foreclosed (REO) on a total of 169,124 U.S. properties in the first six months of 2017, down 14 percent from a year ago to the lowest six-month total since the second half of 2014. Counter to the national trend, 15 states and the District of Columbia posted year-over-year increases in REOs in the first half of 2017. REO activity in the first half of 2017 increased 35 percent from the same time period a year ago in the District, and states with a year-over-year increase included New Jersey (up 41 percent); Illinois (up 9 percent); Arizona (up 6 percent); Massachusetts (up 37 percent); and Connecticut (up 12 percent). Share of foreclosures sold to third-party buyers at new high Among properties lost to foreclosure at the public foreclosure auction in the first half of 2017, 38.3 percent went to third-party buyers, up from 26.9 percent in the first half of 2016 to the highest level as far back as data is available, to the first half of 2000. The share of completed foreclosures going to third-party buyers peaked during the previous housing boom at 22.3 percent in the first half of 2005. Among 183 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000 and sufficient data, those with the highest share of completed foreclosures going to third-party buyers at the foreclosure auction were Reno, Nevada (80.6 percent); Bremerton, Washington (74.0 percent); Salt Lake City, Utah (73.9 percent); Phoenix, Arizona (73.3 percent); and Vallejo-Fairfield, California (71.4 percent). Q2 2017 foreclosure activity below pre-recession averages in 49 percent of markets There were a total of 220,062 U.S. properties with foreclosure filings in Q2 2017, down 6 percent from previous quarter and down 22 percent from a year ago to lowest quarterly total since Q2 2006. The national foreclosure activity total in Q2 2017 was 21 percent below the pre-recession average of 278,912 per quarter from Q1 2006 to Q3 2007, and Q2 2017 was the third consecutive quarter with foreclosure activity below the pre-recession average. Second quarter foreclosure activity was below pre-recession averages in 107 out 217 (49 percent) metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000 and sufficient historical foreclosure data, including Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Miami, Atlanta, San Francisco, Riverside-San Bernardino, Phoenix and Detroit. "Robust home price growth combined with strong employment growth has led to an ongoing decline in foreclosure activity in the greater Seattle area," said Matthew Gardner, chief economist with Windermere Real Estate, covering the Seattle market, where Q1 2017 foreclosure activity was 26 percent below its pre-recession average. "As we move forward through this year, I expect the level of foreclosure activity to continue to drop and fall further below the long-term average." Metro areas with second quarter foreclosure activity still above pre-recession averages included New York, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., Boston, Baltimore, Portland, Oregon, Virginia Beach, Providence, Rhode Island, Richmond, Virginia, and New Orleans. Average foreclosure timeline hits new all-time high Properties foreclosed in the second quarter of 2017 took an average of 883 days from the first public foreclosure notice to complete the foreclosure process, up from 814 days in the previous quarter and up from 631 days in the second quarter of 2016 to the longest average foreclosure timeline as far back as data is available, Q1 2007. States with the longest average foreclosure timelines for foreclosures completed in Q2 2017 were New Jersey (1,347), Indiana (1,259), New York (1,255), Florida (1,203), and Illinois (1,059). States with the shortest average foreclosure timelines for foreclosures completed in Q2 2017 were Virginia (176 days), Alabama (295 days), Arkansas (301 days), Oregon (347 days), and North Carolina (374 days). June foreclosure activity drops to lowest level since November 2005 There were a total of 73,828 U.S. properties with a foreclosure filing in June 2017, down 9 percent from the previous month and down 22 percent from a year ago to the lowest level since November 2005. Report methodologyThe ATTOM Data Solutions U.S. Foreclosure Market Report provides a count of the total number of properties with at least one foreclosure filing entered into the ATTOM Data Warehouse during the month and quarter. Some foreclosure filings entered into the database during the year may have been recorded in the previous year. Data is collected from more than 2,200 counties nationwide, and those counties account for more than 90 percent of the U.S. population. ATTOM's report incorporates documents filed in all three phases of foreclosure: Default — Notice of Default (NOD) and Lis Pendens (LIS); Auction — Notice of Trustee Sale and Notice of Foreclosure Sale (NTS and NFS); and Real Estate Owned, or REO properties (that have been foreclosed on and repurchased by a bank). For the annual, midyear and quarterly reports, if more than one type of foreclosure document is received for a property during the timeframe, only the most recent filing is counted in the report. The annual, midyear, quarterly and monthly reports all check if the same type of document was filed against a property previously. If so, and if that previous filing occurred within the estimated foreclosure timeframe for the state where the property is located, the report does not count the property in the current year, quarter or month. About ATTOM Data SolutionsATTOM Data Solutions is the curator of the ATTOM Data Warehouse, a multi-sourced national property database that blends property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, health hazards, neighborhood characteristics and other property characteristic data for more than 150 million U.S. residential and commercial properties. The ATTOM Data Warehouse delivers actionable data to businesses, consumers, government agencies, universities, policymakers and the media in multiple ways, including bulk file licenses, APIs and customized reports.
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CoreLogic Reports Mortgage Delinquencies Dropped to a 10-Year Low in March 2017
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Q1 2017 Foreclosure Activity Below Pre-Recession Levels Nationwide and In 47 Percent of U.S. Markets
IRVINE, Calif. – April 13, 2017 – ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's largest fused property database, today released its Q1 and March 2017 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report, which shows first quarter foreclosure activity was below pre-recession levels nationwide and in 102 out of 216 metropolitan statistical areas (47 percent) analyzed in the report. Nationwide the report shows foreclosure filings — default notices, scheduled auctions and bank repossessions — were reported on 234,508 U.S. properties in the first quarter of 2017, down 11 percent from the previous quarter and down 19 percent from a year ago to the lowest level since Q3 2006. The first-quarter foreclosure activity total was 16 percent below the pre-recession average of 278,912 properties with foreclosure filings each quarter between Q1 2006 and Q3 2007. "U.S. foreclosure activity on a quarterly basis first dipped below pre-recession averages in the fourth quarter of last year, and this report shows that trend continuing for the second consecutive quarter," said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president with ATTOM Data Solutions. "The number of local markets dropping below pre-recession levels continues to grow, up from 78 a year ago to 102 in this report." Markets below pre-recession levels include Los Angeles, Dallas, Houston The 102 local markets with first quarter foreclosure activity below pre-recession averages included Los Angeles (46 percent below); Dallas (73 percent below); Houston (52 percent below); Miami (44 percent below); and Atlanta (67 percent below). Other major markets with first quarter foreclosure activity below pre-recession averages were San Francisco, Riverside-San Bernardino in Southern California, Phoenix, Detroit and Seattle. "The markets HER Realtors serves are 28 to 45 percent below pre-recession levels," said Matthew Watercutter, senior regional vice president and broker of record for HER Realtors, covering the Dayton, Columbus and Cincinnati markets in Ohio. "The reduced number of foreclosure properties is consistent with lower unemployment rates, and is contributing to the lack of inventory available to consumers. That low inventory, coupled with increased demand, is causing an increase in housing costs, a reduction in days on market and causing frustration among homebuyers wanting to purchase." Markets still above pre-recession levels include New York, Chicago, Philadelphia In 114 out of the 216 markets analyzed (53 percent), first quarter foreclosure activity levels were still above pre-recession averages, including New York (80 percent above); Chicago (9 percent above); Philadelphia (97 percent above); Washington, D.C. (64 percent above); and Boston (26 percent above). Other major markets with first quarter foreclosure activity above pre-recession averages included Baltimore, Virginia Beach, Providence, Rhode Island; Richmond, Virginia; and New Orleans. March foreclosure starts up for second consecutive month, down from year ago The report also shows a total of 83,145 U.S. properties with foreclosure filings in March 2017, up 1 percent from the previous month but down 24 percent from a year ago — the 18th consecutive month with a year-over-year decrease in overall U.S. foreclosure activity. A total of 36,370 U.S. properties started the foreclosure process in March, up 6 percent from the previous month but still down 24 percent from a year ago. March marked the second consecutive month with a month-over-month increase in foreclosure starts, but foreclosure starts were down on a year-over-year basis for the 21st consecutive month in March. Lenders completed the foreclosure process on 28,634 U.S. properties in March, down 4 percent from the previous month and down 15 percent from a year ago. New Jersey, Maryland, Nevada post top state foreclosure rates in March Nationwide in March one in every 1,604 properties had a foreclosure filing. States with the highest foreclosure rates in March were New Jersey (one in every 497 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Maryland (one in every 820 housing units); Nevada (one in every 857 housing units); Delaware (one in every 858 housing units); and Illinois (one in every 863 housing units). Trenton, Atlantic City, Philadelphia post top metro foreclosure rates in March Among 216 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000, those with the highest foreclosure rates in March were Trenton, New Jersey (one in every 355 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Atlantic City, New Jersey (one in every 452 housing units); Philadelphia (one in every 577 housing units); Rockford, Illinois (one in every 631 housing units); and Peoria, Illinois (one in every 710 housing units). Other metros posting top 10 foreclosure rates in March were Reading, Pennsylvania; Las Vegas; Chicago; Baltimore; and Ocala, Florida. DC and 12 states post annual increase in foreclosure activity in March Counter to the national trend, the District of Columbia and 12 states posted year-over-year increases in foreclosure activity in March, including New Jersey (34 percent increase); Oklahoma (13 percent increase); Louisiana (7 percent increase); Connecticut (6 percent increase); and Arizona (6 percent increase). Two of the nation's 10 largest metro areas posted a year-over-year increase in foreclosure activity in March: Philadelphia (up 15 percent); and Phoenix (up 1 percent). Report methodologyThe ATTOM Data Solutions U.S. Foreclosure Market Report provides a count of the total number of properties with at least one foreclosure filing entered into the ATTOM Data Warehouse during the month and quarter. Some foreclosure filings entered into the database during the year may have been recorded in the previous year. Data is collected from more than 2,200 counties nationwide, and those counties account for more than 90 percent of the U.S. population. ATTOM's report incorporates documents filed in all three phases of foreclosure: Default — Notice of Default (NOD) and Lis Pendens (LIS); Auction — Notice of Trustee Sale and Notice of Foreclosure Sale (NTS and NFS); and Real Estate Owned, or REO properties (that have been foreclosed on and repurchased by a bank). For the annual and quarterly reports, if more than one type of foreclosure document is received for a property during the year or quarter, only the most recent filing is counted in the report. The annual, quarterly and monthly reports all check if the same type of document was filed against a property previously. If so, and if that previous filing occurred within the estimated foreclosure timeframe for the state where the property is located, the report does not count the property in the current year, quarter or month. About ATTOM Data SolutionsATTOM Data Solutions is the curator of the ATTOM Data Warehouse, a multi-sourced national property database that blends property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, health hazards, neighborhood characteristics and other property characteristic data for more than 150 million U.S. residential and commercial properties. The ATTOM Data Warehouse delivers actionable data to businesses, consumers, government agencies, universities, policymakers and the media in multiple ways, including bulk file licenses, APIs and customized reports. ATTOM Data Solutions also powers consumer websites designed to promote real estate transparency: RealtyTrac.com is a property search and research portal for foreclosures and other off-market properties; Homefacts.com is a neighborhood research portal providing hyperlocal risks and amenities information; HomeDisclosure.com produces detailed property pre-diligence reports. ATTOM Data and its associated brands are cited by thousands of media outlets each month, including frequent mentions on CBS Evening News, The Today Show, CNBC, CNN, FOX News, PBS NewsHour and in The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and USA TODAY.
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CoreLogic Issues US Residential Foreclosure Crisis Decade in Review
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CoreLogic Reports 21,000 Completed Foreclosures in December 2016
  February 14, 2017, Irvine, Calif. – CoreLogic®, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its December 2016 National Foreclosure Report which shows the foreclosure inventory declined by 30 percent and completed foreclosures declined by 40 percent compared with December 2015. The number of completed foreclosures nationwide decreased year over year from 36,000 in December 2015 to 21,000 in December 2016, representing a decrease of 82 percent from the peak of 118,336 in September 2010. The foreclosure inventory represents the number of homes at some stage of the foreclosure process and completed foreclosures reflect the total number of homes lost to foreclosure. Since the financial crisis began in September 2008, there have been approximately 6.5 million completed foreclosures nationally, and since homeownership rates peaked in the second quarter of 2004, there have been approximately 8.6 million homes lost to foreclosure. As of December 2016, the national foreclosure inventory included approximately 329,000, or 0.8 percent, of all homes with a mortgage compared with 467,000 homes, or 1.2 percent, in December 2015. CoreLogic also reports that the number of mortgages in serious delinquency (defined as 90 days or more past due including loans in foreclosure or REO) declined by 19.4 percent from December 2015 to December 2016 with 1 million mortgages, or 2.6 percent, in serious delinquency, the lowest level since August 2007. The decline was geographically broad with year-over-year decreases in serious delinquency in 48 states and the District of Columbia. "While the decline in serious delinquency has been geographically broad, some oil-producing markets have shown the effects of low oil prices on the housing market," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. "Serious delinquency rates rose in Louisiana, Wyoming and North Dakota, reflecting the weakness in oil production." "Foreclosure and delinquency trends continue to head in the right direction powered principally by increasing employment levels, stringent underwriting standards and higher home prices over the past few years. We expect to see further declines in delinquency and foreclosure rates in 2017," said Anand Nallathambi, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "As the foreclosure inventory diminishes, we must look ahead and tackle tight housing supply and growing affordability issues which are keeping many potential homebuyers, especially first-time buyers, on the sidelines." Additional December 2016 highlights: On a month-over-month basis, completed foreclosures declined by 8.1 percent to 21,000 in December 2016 from the 23,000 reported for November 2016.* As a basis of comparison, before the decline in the housing market in 2007, completed foreclosures averaged about 22,000 per month nationwide between 2000 and 2006. On a month-over-month basis, the December 2016 foreclosure inventory fell 1.9 percent compared with November 2016. The five states with the highest number of completed foreclosures in the 12 months ending in December 2016 were Florida (45,000), Michigan (30,000), Texas (24,000), Ohio (21,000) and California (19,000). These five states accounted for 36 percent of all completed foreclosures nationally. Four states and the District of Columbia had the lowest number of completed foreclosures in the 12 months ending in December 2016: North Dakota (182), the District of Columbia (254), West Virginia (312), Montana (630) and Alaska (668). Four states and the District of Columbia had the highest foreclosure inventory rate in December 2016: New Jersey (2.8 percent), New York (2.7 percent), Maine (1.8 percent), Hawaii (1.7 percent) and the District of Columbia (1.6 percent). The five states with the lowest foreclosure inventory rate in December 2016 were Colorado (0.2 percent), Minnesota (0.3 percent), Utah (0.3 percent), Arizona (0.3 percent) and California (0.3 percent). *November 2016 data was revised. Revisions are standard, and to ensure accuracy CoreLogic incorporates newly released data to provide updated results. For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider. The company's combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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Black Knight: Foreclosure Rate Fell by 30 Percent in 2016, Most Improvement of Any Year on Record
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity Drops to 10-Year Low in 2016
IRVINE, CA--(January 12, 2017) - ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's largest fused property database, today released its Year-End 2016 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report, which shows foreclosure filings -- default notices, scheduled auctions and bank repossessions -- were reported on 933,045 U.S. properties in 2016, down 14 percent from 2015 to the lowest level since 2006, when there were 717,522 U.S. properties with foreclosure filings. The report also shows that 0.70 percent of all U.S. housing units had at least one foreclosure filing in 2016, the lowest annual foreclosure rate nationwide since 2006, when 0.58 percent of housing units had at least one foreclosure filing. ATTOM's year-end foreclosure report is a count of unique properties with a foreclosure filing during the year based on publicly recorded and published foreclosure filings collected in more than 2,500 counties nationwide, with address-level data on more than 23 million foreclosure filings historically also available for license or customized reporting. See full methodology below. The report also includes new data for December, when there were 85,919 U.S. properties with foreclosure filings, down 1 percent from the previous month and down 17 percent from a year ago -- the 15th consecutive month with a year-over-year decrease in foreclosure activity. "The national foreclosure rate stayed within an historically normal range for the third consecutive year in 2016, even as banks continued to clear out legacy foreclosures from the last housing bubble, particularly in the final quarter of the year," said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president at ATTOM Data Solutions, the new parent company of RealtyTrac. "Foreclosures completed in the fourth quarter had been in the foreclosure process 803 days on average, a substantial jump from the third quarter and indicating that banks pushed through significant numbers of legacy foreclosures during the quarter. Despite that push, we still show that more than half of all active foreclosures nationwide are on loans originated between 2004 and 2008, with a much higher share of legacy foreclosures in some markets." Biggest backlogs of legacy foreclosures in New Jersey, New York, Florida Nationwide, 55 percent of all loans actively in foreclosure as of the end of 2016 were originated between 2004 and 2008. The District of Columbia had the highest share of legacy foreclosures with 76 percent, followed by Hawaii (66 percent), New Jersey (64 percent), Nevada (63 percent), Delaware (61 percent), and Massachusetts (61 percent). In terms of total number of legacy foreclosures, New Jersey led the way with 32,279, followed by New York (31,838), Florida (29,411), California (17,208), and Illinois (12,244). Among counties, those with the highest total number of legacy foreclosures were Nassau County (Long Island), New York (8,632 representing 74 percent of all loans actively in foreclosure); Cook County (Chicago), Illinois (7,357 representing 53 percent); Kings County (Brooklyn), New York (6,207 representing 68 percent); Miami-Dade County, Florida (5,262 representing 64 percent); and Los Angeles County, California (4,956 representing 64 percent). Foreclosure activity increases in 12 states, 25 percent of metro areas Counter to the national trend, 12 states and the District of Columbia posted an increase in overall foreclosure activity in 2016 compared to 2015, including Delaware (up 45 percent); Rhode Island (up 29 percent); Massachusetts (up 21 percent); Connecticut (up 21 percent); and Hawaii (up 20 percent). Among 216 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000, 53 of them (25 percent) posted year-over-year increases in foreclosure activity in 2016, led by Provo-Orem, Utah (up 30 percent); Honolulu (up 29 percent); Lynchburg, Virginia (up 29 percent); Springfield, Massachusetts (up 29 percent); and Tucson, Arizona (up 27 percent). Foreclosure starts at new record low nationwide, but increase in 15 states A total of 478,857 U.S. properties started the foreclosure process in 2016, down 16 percent from 2015 and down 78 percent from the peak of 2,139,005 foreclosure starts in 2009 to the lowest level since ATTOM began tracking foreclosure starts in 2006. Counter to the national trend, 15 states and the District of Columbia posted a year-over-year increase in foreclosure starts in 2016, including Delaware (up 37 percent); Connecticut (up 35 percent); Maine (up 30 percent); Rhode Island (up 26 percent); Arizona (up 15 percent); and Massachusetts (up 12 percent). Bank repossessions drop to 10-year low, but increase in 21 states A total of 379,437 U.S. properties were repossessed by lenders (REO) in 2016, down 16 percent from 2015 and down 64 percent from the peak of 1,050,500 REOs in 2010 to the lowest level since 2006. Counter to the national trend, 21 states and the District of Columbia posted a year-over-year increase in REOs in 2016, including Massachusetts (up 61 percent); Alabama (up 32 percent); New York (up 21 percent); Virginia (up 9 percent); and New Jersey (up 4 percent). New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland post top state foreclosure rates in 2016 States with the highest foreclosure rates in 2016 were New Jersey (1.86 percent of housing units with a foreclosure filing); Delaware (1.51 percent); Maryland (1.37 percent); Florida (1.18 percent); and Illinois (1.10 percent). Other states posting foreclosure rates in the top 10 highest in 2016 were Nevada (1.09 percent); South Carolina (0.92 percent); Connecticut (0.91 percent); Ohio (0.89 percent); and New Mexico (0.78 percent). Atlantic City, Trenton, Rockford post top metro foreclosure rates in 2016 Among 216 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000, those with the highest foreclosure rate in 2016 were Atlantic City, New Jersey (3.39 percent of housing units with a foreclosure filing); Trenton, New Jersey (2.16 percent); Rockford, Illinois (1.54 percent); Philadelphia (1.53 percent); and Lakeland-Winter Haven, Florida (1.46 percent). Other metro areas with foreclosure rates ranking among the top 10 highest nationwide in 2016 were Baltimore, Maryland (1.45 percent of housing units with a foreclosure filing); Tampa-St. Petersburg, Florida (1.38 percent); Chicago (1.35 percent); Columbia, South Carolina (1.32 percent); and Miami (1.30 percent). Average time to foreclose jumps to new record high U.S. properties foreclosed in the fourth quarter of 2016 had been in the foreclosure process an average of 803 days, a 29 percent jump from the previous quarter and a 27 percent increase from a year ago to the longest since ATTOM began tracking average foreclosure timelines in Q1 2007. There were eight states where the average time to foreclose in the fourth quarter was more than 1,000 days: Utah (1,403); New Jersey (1,383); New York (1,283); Hawaii (1,220); Florida (1,186); Indiana (1,033); Illinois (1,024); and Pennsylvania (1,010). States with the shortest average time to foreclose for properties foreclosed in the fourth quarter of 2016 were Virginia (223 days); Michigan (355 days); Oregon (362 days); Alabama (363 days); and Colorado (381 days). Report methodologyThe ATTOM Data Solutions Year-End U.S. Foreclosure Market Report provides a count of the total number of properties with at least one foreclosure filing entered into the ATTOM Data Warehouse during the year. Some foreclosure filings entered into the database during the year may have been recorded in the previous year. Data is collected from more than 2,200 counties nationwide, and those counties account for more than 90 percent of the U.S. population. ATTOM's report incorporates documents filed in all three phases of foreclosure: Default - Notice of Default (NOD) and Lis Pendens (LIS); Auction - Notice of Trustee Sale and Notice of Foreclosure Sale (NTS and NFS); and Real Estate Owned, or REO properties (that have been foreclosed on and repurchased by a bank). For the annual and quarterly reports, if more than one type of foreclosure document is received for a property during the year or quarter, only the most recent filing is counted in the report. The annual, quarterly and monthly reports all check if the same type of document was filed against a property previously. If so, and if that previous filing occurred within the estimated foreclosure timeframe for the state where the property is located, the report does not count the property in the current year, quarter or month. About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions is the curator of the ATTOM Data Warehouse, a multi-sourced national property database that blends property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, health hazards, neighborhood characteristics and other property characteristic data for more than 150 million U.S. residential and commercial properties. The ATTOM Data Warehouse delivers actionable data to businesses, consumers, government agencies, universities, policymakers and the media in multiple ways, including bulk file licenses, APIs and customized reports. ATTOM Data Solutions also powers consumer websites designed to promote real estate transparency: RealtyTrac.com is a property search and research portal for foreclosures and other off-market properties; Homefacts.com is a neighborhood research portal providing hyperlocal risks and amenities information; HomeDisclosure.com produces detailed property pre-diligence reports. ATTOM Data and its associated brands are cited by thousands of media outlets each month, including frequent mentions on CBS Evening News, The Today Show, CNBC, CNN, FOX News, PBS NewsHour and in The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and USA TODAY.
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Freddie Mac Announces Holiday Eviction Moratorium Dec. 19, 2016 to Jan. 3, 2017
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CoreLogic Reports 30,000 Completed Foreclosures in October 2016
  December 13, 2016, Irvine, Calif. – CoreLogic®, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its  October 2016 National Foreclosure Report which shows the foreclosure inventory declined by 31.5 percent and completed foreclosures declined by 24.9 percent compared with October 2015. The number of completed foreclosures nationwide decreased year over year from 40,000 in October 2015 to 30,000 in October 2016, representing a decrease of 74.7 percent from the peak of 118,287 in September 2010. The foreclosure inventory represents the number of homes at some stage of the foreclosure process and completed foreclosures reflect the total number of homes lost to foreclosure. Since the financial crisis began in September 2008, there have been approximately 6.5 million completed foreclosures nationally, and since homeownership rates peaked in the second quarter of 2004, there have been approximately 8.5 million homes lost to foreclosure. As of October 2016, the national foreclosure inventory included approximately 328,000, or 0.8 percent, of all homes with a mortgage, compared with 479,000 homes, or 1.2 percent, in October 2015. CoreLogic also reports that the number of mortgages in serious delinquency (defined as 90 days or more past due including loans in foreclosure or REO) declined by 24.8 percent from October 2015 to October 2016, with 1 million mortgages, or 2.5 percent, in serious delinquency, the lowest level since August 2007. The decline was geographically broad with decreases in serious delinquency in 47 states and the District of Columbia. "Loan performance varies by the health of the local economy and housing market. Alaska, North Dakota and Wyoming, three states with energy-related job loss, experienced a rise in serious delinquency rates while all other states had a decline," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. "Although there were large declines in foreclosure rates in New York and New Jersey, both states experienced the highest serious delinquency rates in the nation, reflecting lagging home values in most neighborhoods and an unemployment rate above the national average." "Housing and labor markets improved over the past year, setting the stage for further declines in foreclosure rates across much of the nation," said Anand Nallathambi, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "Home values posted an annual gain of 5.8 percent through September in the CoreLogic Home Price Index, and payroll employment rose 2.4 million for the year through October." Additional October 2016 highlights: On a month-over-month basis, completed foreclosures declined by 27.5 percent to 30,000 in October 2016 from the 41,000 reported for September 2016.* As a basis of comparison, before the decline in the housing market in 2007, completed foreclosures averaged 22,000 per month nationwide between 2000 and 2006. On a month-over-month basis, the October 2016 foreclosure inventory was down 3.6 percent compared with September 2016. The five states with the highest number of completed foreclosures in the 12 months ending in October 2016 were Florida (51,000), Michigan (29,000), Texas (26,000), Ohio (23,000) and Georgia (20,000). These five states accounted for 36 percent of completed foreclosures nationally. Four states and the District of Columbia had the lowest number of completed foreclosures in the 12 months ending in October 2016: the District of Columbia (212), North Dakota (278), West Virginia (407), Alaska (622), and Montana (660). Four states and the District of Columbia had the highest foreclosure inventory rate in October 2016: New Jersey (2.8 percent), New York (2.7 percent), Maine (1.7 percent), Hawaii (1.7 percent) and the District of Columbia (1.6 percent). The five states with the lowest foreclosure inventory rate in October 2016 were Colorado (0.3 percent), Minnesota (0.3 percent), Arizona (0.3 percent), Utah (0.3 percent) and Michigan (0.3 percent). *September 2016 data was revised. Revisions are standard, and to ensure accuracy CoreLogic incorporates newly released data to provide updated results. For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog. Methodology The data in this report represents foreclosure activity reported through October 2016. This report separates state data into judicial versus non-judicial foreclosure state categories. In judicial foreclosure states, lenders must provide evidence to the courts of delinquency in order to move a borrower into foreclosure. In non-judicial foreclosure states, lenders can issue notices of default directly to the borrower without court intervention. This is an important distinction since judicial states, as a rule, have longer foreclosure timelines, thus affecting foreclosure statistics. A completed foreclosure occurs when a property is auctioned and results in the purchase of the home at auction by either a third party, such as an investor, or by the lender. If the home is purchased by the lender, it is moved into the lender's real estate-owned (REO) inventory. In "foreclosure by advertisement" states, a redemption period begins after the auction and runs for a statutory period, e.g., six months. During that period, the borrower may regain the foreclosed home by paying all amounts due as calculated under the statute. For purposes of this Foreclosure Report, because so few homes are actually redeemed following an auction, it is assumed that the foreclosure process ends in "foreclosure by advertisement" states at the completion of the auction. The foreclosure inventory represents the number and share of mortgaged homes that have been placed into the process of foreclosure by the mortgage servicer. Mortgage servicers start the foreclosure process when the mortgage reaches a specific level of serious delinquency as dictated by the investor for the mortgage loan. Once a foreclosure is "started," and absent the borrower paying all amounts necessary to halt the foreclosure, the home remains in foreclosure until the completed foreclosure results in the sale to a third party at auction or the home enters the lender's REO inventory. The data in this report accounts for only first liens against a property and does not include secondary liens. The foreclosure inventory is measured only against homes that have an outstanding mortgage. Generally, homes with no mortgage liens are not subject to foreclosure and are, therefore, excluded from the analysis. Approximately one-third of homes nationally are owned outright and do not have a mortgage. CoreLogic has approximately 85 percent coverage of U.S. foreclosure data. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider. The company's combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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CoreLogic Reports 36,000 Completed Foreclosures in September 2016
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Distressed Home Sales Drop to Nine-Year Low in Q3 2016
IRVINE, CA--(November 03, 2016) - ATTOM Data Solutions, the nation's leading source for comprehensive housing data and the new parent company of RealtyTrac, today released its Q3 2016 U.S. Home Sales Report, which shows that distressed sales -- including bank-owned (REO) sales, sales of homes actively in foreclosure, and short sales -- accounted for 12.9 percent of all U.S. single family home and condo sales in Q3 2016, down from 15.0 percent in the previous quarter and down from 15.9 percent in Q3 2015 to the lowest share of distressed home sales since Q3 2007, when distressed sales accounted for 12.3 percent of all home sales. The peak in share of distressed sales was Q1 2009 at 43.9 percent of all U.S. single family home and condo sales. The report also shows that all-cash purchases accounted for 25.9 percent of all single family home and condo sales in Q3 2016, down from 27.4 percent in the previous quarter and down from 29.2 percent in Q3 2015 to the lowest level since Q3 2007, when all-cash purchases accounted for 24.3 percent of all home sales. The peak in share of all-cash purchases was Q1 2011 at 44.8 percent of all U.S. single family home and condo sales. "Distressed inventory for sale is virtually non-existent in many of the nation's hottest housing markets, and when a distressed property is listed for sale in those markets it often sells quickly and at little or no discount," said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president at ATTOM Data Solutions. "The scarcity of discounted distressed inventory is chasing away cash buyers and other bargain hunters, but it's certainly good news for home sellers, who nationwide realized the biggest home price gains since purchase in nine years. "We are seeing the average seller home price gain since purchase start to wane in some of the highest-priced markets where appreciation is beginning to cool, indicating those markets are past their prime as sellers' markets," Blomquist continued. "Meanwhile there are still a number of buyers' markets across the country where a high level of lingering distress and relatively weak demand from owner-occupant buyers provides investors with plenty of bargain-buying opportunities." Q3 home sellers realize biggest gains in San Jose, San Francisco, Portland Nationwide, homeowners who sold in Q3 2016 sold for an average of $43,000 above their purchase price, a 23 percent average home price gain since purchase -- the highest since Q3 2007. Among 118 metropolitan statistical areas with at least 1,000 single family and condo sales in the third quarter, those with the highest average home price gain since purchase for home sellers in Q3 2016 were San Jose (68 percent); San Francisco (67 percent); Portland (51 percent); Seattle (51 percent); and Los Angeles (49 percent). Two of those top five markets -- San Francisco and San Jose -- saw the average home price gain since purchase decline after peaking in the previous quarter. "Seattle clearly stands out as a housing market that continues to outperform the vast majority of markets in the U.S. relative to price appreciation," said Matthew Gardner, chief economist at Windermere Real Estate, covering the Seattle market. "This can be attributed to its booming economy and inventory limitations, which are largely a result of the region's topographic and governmental constraints regarding land. "The Seattle region remains staunchly a sellers' market and this will likely not change until next year, at which point, I expect to see an increase in resale listings and new construction development," Gardner continued. "However, despite this supply of new inventory, Seattle area home prices are still expected to outperform the rest of the U.S. in 2017." Five markets where Q3 2016 home sellers lost home value since purchase Homeowners who sold in Q3 2016 realized an average loss in home price since purchase in five of the 118 markets analyzed (4 percent): Huntsville, Alabama (5 percent loss); Mobile, Alabama (4 percent loss); Greensboro-High Point, North Carolina (2 percent loss); Augusta, Georgia (2 percent loss); and Winston-Salem, North Carolina (1 percent loss). There were five additional markets analyzed where the average profit since purchase for homeowners who sold in Q3 2016 was 3 percent or less: Dayton, Ohio (0 percent); Columbia, South Carolina (0 percent); Baton Rouge, Louisiana (1 percent); Cleveland, Ohio (1 percent); and Little Rock, Arkansas (3 percent). Highest share of distressed sales in Toledo, Tucson, Rockford Among metropolitan statistical areas with at least 1,000 single family home and condo sales in Q3 2016, those with the highest share of distressed sales in Q3 2016 were Toledo, Ohio (36.4 percent); Tucson, Arizona (24.4 percent); Rockford, Illinois (23.8 percent); Las Vegas (20.9 percent); and Lakeland-Winter Haven, Florida (20.1 percent). Other markets where distressed sales accounted for more than 15 percent of all single family home and condo sales in Q3 2016 included Chicago, Orlando, Miami, Tampa, Memphis, Baltimore, Jacksonville (Florida), Cleveland, Virginia Beach, and New York. Lowest share of distressed sales in Anchorage, Austin, Boulder Metro areas with the lowest share of distressed sales in Q3 2016 were Anchorage, Alaska (3.7 percent); Austin, Texas (4.2 percent); Boulder, Colorado (4.6 percent); Asheville, North Carolina (5.4 percent); and Springfield, Missouri (5.7 percent). Other markets where the share of distressed sales accounted for less than 10 percent of all sales included Dallas, San Antonio, Houston, Denver, San Jose, Nashville, Pittsburgh, Seattle, San Francisco, and Minneapolis-St. Paul. Biggest bank-owned discounts in Pittsburgh, Toledo, Memphis The median price of a bank-owned (REO) home in Q3 2016 was $131,500, 43 percent below the overall median price for all homes -- up from a 42 percent discount in the previous quarter but equal to the 43 percent REO discount in Q3 2015. Metro areas with the biggest REO discount in Q3 2016 were Pittsburgh (67 percent); Toledo, Ohio (66 percent); Memphis (63 percent); Birmingham, Alabama (62 percent); and Philadelphia (62 percent). Other markets with an REO discount of more than 45 percent in Q3 2016 included Milwaukee, Rochester (New York), Columbus (Ohio), Cleveland, New York, Detroit, St. Louis, Cincinnati, and Baltimore. Smallest bank-owned discounts in Austin, Boulder, Provo Metro areas with the smallest REO discount in Q3 2016 were Austin, Texas (0 percent); Boulder, Colorado (7 percent); Provo-Orem, Utah (8 percent); Boise, Idaho (9 percent); and Denver (10 percent). Other markets where the REO discount in Q3 2016 was below 20 percent included San Diego, Salt Lake City, San Jose, Indianapolis, San Antonio, Houston, Phoenix, Las Vegas and Los Angeles. 40 percent of local markets reach new all-time price peak in Q3 2016 Nationwide single family homes and condos sold for a median price of $230,000 in Q3 2016, up 6 percent from the previous quarter and up 10 percent from a year ago to a new all-time high in home prices -- 1 percent above the pre-recession peak of $227,000 in Q3 2005. Since bottoming out in Q1 2012, national median home prices have risen 60 percent. Out of 118 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report, 47 (40 percent) reached new all-time home price peaks in Q3 2016, including Dallas, Atlanta, Detroit, Seattle, Minneapolis, St. Louis, Baltimore, Pittsburgh, Portland and San Antonio. Metro areas with the biggest year-over-year increase in median sales prices in Q3 2016 were Jacksonville, Florida (up 24 percent); Tampa-St. Petersburg, Florida (up 17 percent); Palm Bay-Melbourne-Titusville, Florida (up 17 percent); Chicago (up 17 percent); and Pensacola, Florida (up 15 percent). Highest share of cash buyers in Raleigh, Miami, Naples Among metropolitan statistical areas with at least 1,000 single family and condo home sales in Q3 2016, those with the highest share of all-cash purchases were Raleigh, North Carolina (53.1 percent), Miami (45.8 percent); Naples, Florida (45.2 percent); Ocala, Florida (44.9 percent); and North Port-Sarasota-Bradenton, Florida (43.2 percent). FHA buyer share declines for second consecutive quarter Nationwide, buyers using loans backed by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) accounted for 15.9 percent of all single family and condo home sales in Q3 2016, down from 16.1 percent in Q2 2016 and down from 16.7 percent a year ago. The FHA share of buyers has declined on a year-over-year basis for two consecutive quarters nationwide following seven consecutive quarters of year-over-year increases. Among metropolitan statistical areas with at least 1,000 single family and condo sales in Q3 2016, those with the highest share of FHA buyers were Ogden-Clearfield, Utah (35.5 percent); Indianapolis (31.6 percent); Salt Lake City (28.5 percent); Albuquerque, New Mexico (27.5 percent); and Riverside-San Bernardino, California (26.4 percent). Institutional Investor share increases for second consecutive quarter Nationwide, institutional investors (entities purchasing at least 10 homes in a calendar year) accounted for 2.7 percent of all single family and condo home sales in Q3 2016, up from 2.6 percent in the previous quarter and up from 2.2 percent a year ago. It was the second consecutive quarter where the institutional investor share of sales increased from a year ago following 11 consecutive quarters of year-over-year decreases. Among metropolitan statistical areas with at least 1,000 total sales in Q3 2016, those with the highest share of institutional investor purchases were Memphis (12.3 percent); Birmingham, Alabama (9.0 percent); Lakeland-Winterhaven, Florida (7.5 percent); York-Hanover, Pennsylvania (5.9 percent); and Tulsa, Oklahoma (5.6 percent). Report methodology The RealtyTrac U.S. Home Sales Report provides percentages of distressed sales and all sales that are sold to investors, institutional investors and cash buyers, a state and metropolitan statistical area. Data is also available at the county and zip code level upon request. The data is derived from recorded sales deeds, foreclosure filings and loan data. Statistics for previous quarters are revised when each new report is issued as more deed data becomes available for those previous months. Median sales price is calculated based on the sales price on the publicly recorded sales deed when available. If no sales price is recorded then the purchase loan amount is used to calculate median price, and if no purchase loan amount is available, the property's Automated Valuation Model (AVM) at time of sale is used to calculate the median price. About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions is the curator of the ATTOM Data Warehouse, a multi-sourced national property database that aggregates property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, health hazards, neighborhood characteristics and other property characteristic data for more than 150 million U.S. properties. The ATTOM Data Warehouse delivers actionable data to businesses, consumers, government agencies, universities, policymakers and the media in multiple ways, including bulk file licenses, APIs and customized reports. ATTOM Data Solutions also powers consumer websites designed to promote real estate transparency: RealtyTrac.com is a property search and research portal for foreclosures and other off-market properties; Homefacts.com is a neighborhood research portal providing hyperlocal risks and amenities information; HomeDisclosure.com produces detailed property pre-diligence reports. ATTOM Data and its associated brands are cited by thousands of media outlets each month, including frequent mentions on CBS Evening News, The Today Show, CNBC, CNN, FOX News, PBS NewsHour and in The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and USA TODAY.
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Post-'Brexit' Prepay Activity Remains Strong; Foreclosure Rate Falls to Nine-Year Low
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The Foreclosure Gender Gap: Foreclosure Rates Higher for Male Homeowners than Female Homeowners
IRVINE, CA--(October 18, 2016) - ATTOM Data Solutions, the nation's leading source for comprehensive housing data and the new parent company of RealtyTrac, today released an analysis showing homes owned by men had a higher foreclosure rate on average than homes owned by women as of the end of Q3 2016. ATTOM analyzed tax assessor records and publicly recorded foreclosure filings for more than 5 million single family homes and condos nationwide where the primary homeowner was identified as an individual man or an individual woman. The analysis did not include homes owned by married couples when both were listed as homeowners or other joint homeownership situations. The analysis found that 73 out of every 10,000 homes with individual male homeowners were in foreclosure as of the end of Q3 2016 while 72 out of every 10,000 homes owned by individual female homeowners were in foreclosure. The foreclosure rate gap was even bigger between married men and married women homeowners -- 83 out of every 10,000 homes with an individual married man listed as the primary homeowner were in foreclosure while 66 out of every 10,000 homes with an individual married woman listed as the primary homeowner were in foreclosure. The biggest foreclosure rate gender gap was among widowed homeowners. The foreclosure rate for widowers was 112 out of every 10,000 homes while the foreclosure rate for widows was 94 out of every 10,000 homes. The exception to the rule was among single and unmarried homeowners where homes owned by women had higher foreclosure rates on average (73 out of every 10,000 homes) than those owned by men (70 out of every 10,000 homes). About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions is the curator of the ATTOM Data Warehouse, a multi-sourced national property database that aggregates property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, health hazards, neighborhood characteristics and other property characteristic data for more than 150 million U.S. properties. The ATTOM Data Warehouse delivers actionable data to businesses, consumers, government agencies, universities, policymakers and the media in multiple ways, including bulk file licenses, APIs and customized reports. ATTOM Data Solutions also powers consumer websites designed to promote real estate transparency: RealtyTrac.com is a property search and research portal for foreclosures and other off-market properties; Homefacts.com is a neighborhood research portal providing hyperlocal risks and amenities information; HomeDisclosure.com produces detailed property pre-diligence reports.
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September Foreclosure Activity Decreases 24 Percent From a Year Ago to Lowest Level Since December 2005
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CoreLogic Reports 37,000 Completed Foreclosures in August 2016
  October 11, 2016, Irvine, Calif. – CoreLogic®, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its August 2016 National Foreclosure Report which shows the foreclosure inventory declined by 29.6 percent and completed foreclosures declined by 42.4 percent compared with August 2015. The number of completed foreclosures nationwide decreased year over year from 64,000 in August 2015 to 37,000 in August 2016, representing a decrease of 69 percent from the peak of 118,221 in September 2010. The foreclosure inventory represents the number of homes at some stage of the foreclosure process and completed foreclosures reflect the total number of homes lost to foreclosure. Since the financial crisis began in September 2008, there have been approximately 6.4 million completed foreclosures nationally, and since homeownership rates peaked in the second quarter of 2004, there have been approximately 8.5 million homes lost to foreclosure. As of August 2016, the national foreclosure inventory included approximately 351,000, or 0.9 percent, of all homes with a mortgage compared with 499,000 homes, or 1.3 percent, in August 2015. The August 2016 foreclosure inventory rate is the lowest it's been since July 2007. CoreLogic also reports that the number of mortgages in serious delinquency (defined as 90 days or more past due including loans in foreclosure or REO) declined by 20.6 percent from August 2015 to August 2016, with 1.1 million mortgages, or 2.8 percent, the lowest level since September 2007. The decline was geographically broad with decreases in serious delinquency in 48 states and the District of Columbia. "Foreclosure inventory fell by 30 percent from the previous year, the largest year-over-year decline since January 2015," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. "The large decline in the distressed inventory has been one of the drivers of steady home price growth which helps Americans increase their home equity to support increased spending or cushion future economic risk." "Foreclosure rates and serious delinquency continued to trend down in August as real estate markets across many parts of the U.S. exhibit strong demand growth and rising prices," said Anand Nallathambi, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "With the foreclosure inventory now under 1 percent nationally, the need to boost single-family housing stocks through new construction will become more acute in the coming months and years." Additional August 2016 highlights: On a month-over-month basis, completed foreclosures increased by 7.7 percent to 37,000 in August 2016 from the 34,000 reported for July 2016.* As a basis of comparison, before the decline in the housing market in 2007, completed foreclosures averaged 21,000 per month nationwide between 2000 and 2006. On a month-over-month basis, the August 2016 foreclosure inventory was down 3.2 percent compared with July 2016. The five states with the highest number of completed foreclosures in the 12 months ending in August 2016 were Florida (55,000), Texas (27,000), Ohio (23,000), California (22,000) and Georgia (21,000). These five states account for about 35 percent of completed foreclosures nationally. Four states and the District of Columbia had the lowest number of completed foreclosures in the 12 months ending in August 2016: the District of Columbia (212), North Dakota (341), West Virginia (469), Alaska (624) and Montana (717). Four states and the District of Columbia had the highest foreclosure inventory rate in August 2016: New Jersey (3.2 percent), New York (2.9 percent), Maine (1.8 percent), Hawaii (1.8 percent) and the District of Columbia (1.8 percent). The five states with the lowest foreclosure inventory rate in August 2016 were Colorado (0.3 percent), Minnesota (0.3 percent), Arizona (0.3 percent), Utah (0.3 percent) and Michigan (0.3 percent). *July 2016 data was revised. Revisions are standard, and to ensure accuracy CoreLogic incorporates newly released data to provide updated results. For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog: http://www.corelogic.com/blog. Methodology The data in this report represents foreclosure activity reported through August 2016. This report separates state data into judicial versus non-judicial foreclosure state categories. In judicial foreclosure states, lenders must provide evidence to the courts of delinquency in order to move a borrower into foreclosure. In non-judicial foreclosure states, lenders can issue notices of default directly to the borrower without court intervention. This is an important distinction since judicial states, as a rule, have longer foreclosure timelines, thus affecting foreclosure statistics. A completed foreclosure occurs when a property is auctioned and results in the purchase of the home at auction by either a third party, such as an investor, or by the lender. If the home is purchased by the lender, it is moved into the lender's real estate-owned (REO) inventory. In "foreclosure by advertisement" states, a redemption period begins after the auction and runs for a statutory period, e.g., six months. During that period, the borrower may regain the foreclosed home by paying all amounts due as calculated under the statute. For purposes of this Foreclosure Report, because so few homes are actually redeemed following an auction, it is assumed that the foreclosure process ends in "foreclosure by advertisement" states at the completion of the auction. The foreclosure inventory represents the number and share of mortgaged homes that have been placed into the process of foreclosure by the mortgage servicer. Mortgage servicers start the foreclosure process when the mortgage reaches a specific level of serious delinquency as dictated by the investor for the mortgage loan. Once a foreclosure is "started," and absent the borrower paying all amounts necessary to halt the foreclosure, the home remains in foreclosure until the completed foreclosure results in the sale to a third party at auction or the home enters the lender's REO inventory. The data in this report accounts for only first liens against a property and does not include secondary liens. The foreclosure inventory is measured only against homes that have an outstanding mortgage. Generally, homes with no mortgage liens are not subject to foreclosure and are, therefore, excluded from the analysis. Approximately one-third of homes nationally are owned outright and do not have a mortgage. CoreLogic has approximately 85 percent coverage of U.S. foreclosure data. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider. The company's combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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CoreLogic Reports 38,000 Completed Foreclosures in June 2016
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CoreLogic Reports 38,000 Completed Foreclosures in May 2016
  July 12, 2016, Irvine, Calif. – CoreLogic®, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled services provider, today released its May 2016 National Foreclosure Report which shows the foreclosure inventory declined by 24.5 percent and completed foreclosures declined by 6.9 percent compared with May 2015. The number of completed foreclosures nationwide decreased year over year from 41,000 in May 2015 to 38,000 in May 2016, representing a decrease of 67.9 percent from the peak of 117,813 in September 2010. The foreclosure inventory represents the number of homes at some stage of the foreclosure process and completed foreclosures reflect the total number of homes lost to foreclosure. Since the financial crisis began in September 2008, there have been approximately 6.3 million completed foreclosures nationally, and since homeownership rates peaked in the second quarter of 2004, there have been approximately 8.3 million homes lost to foreclosure. As of May 2016, the national foreclosure inventory included approximately 390,000, or 1.0 percent, of all homes with a mortgage compared with 517,000 homes, or 1.3 percent, in May 2015. The May 2016 foreclosure inventory rate is the lowest for any month since October 2007. CoreLogic also reports that the number of mortgages in serious delinquency (defined as 90 days or more past due including loans in foreclosure or REO) declined by 21.6 percent from May 2015 to May 2016, with 1.1 million mortgages, or 2.8 percent, in this category. The May 2016 serious delinquency rate is the lowest in more than eight years, since October 2007. "The foreclosure rate fell to 1 percent in May, which is twice the long-term average of 0.5 percent. However, this masks the underlying progress at the state level," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. "Twenty-nine states had foreclosure rates below the national average, and all but North Dakota experienced declines in their foreclosure rate compared to the prior year." "Delinquency and foreclosure rates continue to drop as we experience the benefits of a combination of tight underwriting, job and income growth and a steady rise in home prices. We expect these factors to remain in place for the remainder of this year and for delinquency and foreclosure rates to decline even further," said Anand Nallathambi, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "As we finally move past the housing crisis, we need to increase our focus on expanding the supply of affordable housing and access to credit for first-time homebuyers in sustainable ways to ensure the long-term health of the U.S. housing market." Additional May 2016 highlights: On a month-over-month basis, completed foreclosures increased by 5.5 percent to 38,000 in May 2016 from the 36,000 reported for April 2016.* As a basis of comparison, before the decline in the housing market in 2007, completed foreclosures averaged 21,000 per month nationwide between 2000 and 2006. On a month-over-month basis, the foreclosure inventory was down 3.0 percent compared with April 2016.The five states with the highest number of completed foreclosures were Florida (63,000), Michigan (45,000), Texas (27,000), Ohio (23,000) and California (23,000). These five states account for almost half of all completed foreclosures nationally.Four states and the District of Columbia had the lowest number of completed foreclosures: the District of Columbia (139), North Dakota (323), West Virginia (494), Alaska (648) and Montana (690). Four states and the District of Columbia had the highest foreclosure inventory rate: New Jersey (3.6 percent), New York (3.2 percent), Hawaii (2.1 percent), the District of Columbia (2.0 percent) and Maine (1.9 percent). The five states with the lowest foreclosure inventory rate were Alaska (0.3 percent), Arizona (0.3 percent), Colorado (0.3 percent), Minnesota (0.3 percent) and Utah (0.3 percent). *April 2016 data was revised. Revisions are standard, and to ensure accuracy CoreLogic incorporates newly released data to provide updated results. For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog: http://www.corelogic.com/blog. Methodology The data in this report represents foreclosure activity reported through May 2016. This report separates state data into judicial versus non-judicial foreclosure state categories. In judicial foreclosure states, lenders must provide evidence to the courts of delinquency in order to move a borrower into foreclosure. In non-judicial foreclosure states, lenders can issue notices of default directly to the borrower without court intervention. This is an important distinction since judicial states, as a rule, have longer foreclosure timelines, thus affecting foreclosure statistics. A completed foreclosure occurs when a property is auctioned and results in the purchase of the home at auction by either a third party, such as an investor, or by the lender. If the home is purchased by the lender, it is moved into the lender's real estate-owned (REO) inventory. In "foreclosure by advertisement" states, a redemption period begins after the auction and runs for a statutory period, e.g., six months. During that period, the borrower may regain the foreclosed home by paying all amounts due as calculated under the statute. For purposes of this Foreclosure Report, because so few homes are actually redeemed following an auction, it is assumed that the foreclosure process ends in "foreclosure by advertisement" states at the completion of the auction. The foreclosure inventory represents the number and share of mortgaged homes that have been placed into the process of foreclosure by the mortgage servicer. Mortgage servicers start the foreclosure process when the mortgage reaches a specific level of serious delinquency as dictated by the investor for the mortgage loan. Once a foreclosure is "started," and absent the borrower paying all amounts necessary to halt the foreclosure, the home remains in foreclosure until the completed foreclosure results in the sale to a third party at auction or the home enters the lender's REO inventory. The data in this report accounts for only first liens against a property and does not include secondary liens. The foreclosure inventory is measured only against homes that have an outstanding mortgage. Generally, homes with no mortgage liens are not subject to foreclosure and are, therefore, excluded from the analysis. Approximately one-third of homes nationally are owned outright and do not have a mortgage. CoreLogic has approximately 85 percent coverage of U.S. foreclosure data. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled services provider. The company's combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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CoreLogic Reports 37,000 Completed Foreclosures in April 2016
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First Look at April Mortgage Data: Lowest Number of Foreclosure Starts in 10 Years; Prepay Activity Falls Despite Low Rates
JACKSONVILLE, Fla., May 24, 2016 -- The Data & Analytics division of Black Knight Financial Services, Inc. reports the following "first look" at April 2016 month-end mortgage performance statistics derived from its loan-level database representing the majority of the national mortgage market. Total U.S. foreclosure pre-sale inventory rate: 1.17%Month-over-month change: -5.87%Year-over-year change: -27.76% Total U.S. foreclosure starts: 58,700Month-over-month change: -19.37%Year-over-year change: -16.62% Monthly Prepayment Rate (SMM): 1.26%Month-over-month change: -3.24%Year-over-year change: -7.25% Foreclosure Sales as % of 90+: 2.13%Month-over-month change: -2.53%Year-over-year change: 6.20% Number of properties that are 30 or more days past due, but not in foreclosure: 2,146,000Month-over-month change: 84,000Year-over-year change: -235,000 Number of properties that are 90 or more days past due, but not in foreclosure: 730,000Month-over-month change: -3,000Year-over-year change: -179,000 Number of properties in foreclosure pre-sale inventory: 595,000Month-over-month change: -36,000Year-over-year change: -225,000 Number of properties that are 30 or more days past due or in foreclosure: 2,741,000Month-over-month change: 48,000Year-over-year change: -460,000 Top 5 States by Non-Current* Percentage Mississippi:     11.04% Louisiana:        9.05% New Jersey:     9.03% New York:        7.92% Maine:             7.92% Bottom 5 States by Non-Current* Percentage Alaska:            2.99% South Dakota:  2.86% Minnesota:       2.72% Colorado:         2.53% North Dakota:   2.17% Top 5 States by 90+ Days Delinquent Percentage Mississippi:      3.67% Louisiana:        2.73% Alabama:         2.58% Arkansas:         2.19% Rhode Island:  2.15% Top 5 States by 6-Month Improvement in Non-Current* Percentage Nebraska:        -19.69% Florida:            -15.88% Washington:     -14.92% Michigan:         -14.80% Illinois:             -14.69% Top 5 States by 6-Month Deterioration in Non-Current* Percentage Alaska:            19.29% North Dakota:    2.33% Wyoming:        -2.15% Montana:         -6.48% Louisiana:        -7.62% *Non-current totals combine foreclosures and delinquencies as a percent of active loans in that state. About Black Knight Financial Services, Inc. Black Knight, a Fidelity National Financial (NYSE:FNF) company, is a leading provider of integrated technology, data and analytics solutions that facilitate and automate many of the business processes across the mortgage lifecycle. Black Knight is committed to being the premier business partner that lenders and servicers rely on to achieve their strategic goals, realize greater success and better serve their customers by delivering best-in-class technology, services and insight with a relentless commitment to excellence, innovation, integrity and leadership. For more information on Black Knight, please visit www.bkfs.com.
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Vacant "Zombie" Foreclosures Decrease 30 Percent in Second Quarter 2016 Compared to a Year Ago
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CoreLogic Reports 36,000 Completed Foreclosures in March 2016
  May 10, 2016, Irvine, Calif. – CoreLogic®, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled services provider, today released its March 2016 National Foreclosure Report which shows the foreclosure inventory declined by 23.2 percent and completed foreclosures declined by 14.9 percent compared with March 2015. The number of completed foreclosures nationwide decreased year over year from 42,000 in March 2015 to 36,000 in March 2016, representing a decrease of 69.7 percent from the peak of 117,782 in September 2010. The foreclosure inventory represents the number of homes at some stage of the foreclosure process and completed foreclosures reflect the total number of homes lost to foreclosure. Since the financial crisis began in September 2008, there have been approximately 6.2 million completed foreclosures nationally, and since homeownership rates peaked in the second quarter of 2004, there have been approximately 8.2 million homes lost to foreclosure. As of March 2016, the national foreclosure inventory included approximately 427,000, or 1.1 percent, of all homes with a mortgage compared with 556,000 homes, or 1.4 percent, in March 2015. The March 2016 foreclosure inventory rate is the lowest for any month since October 2007. CoreLogic also reports that the number of mortgages in serious delinquency (defined as 90 days or more past due including loans in foreclosure or REO) declined by 19.1 percent from March 2015 to March 2016, with 1.2 million mortgages, or 3.1 percent, in this category. The March 2016 serious delinquency rate is the lowest in more than eight years, since November 2007. "Nationally, the economy added 609,000 jobs during the first three months of 2016, and average weekly earnings grew 2 percent over the past year," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. "Job and earnings growth have helped bring serious delinquency rates down in nearly every state. However, serious delinquency rates increased in North Dakota and West Virginia, two states affected by the drop in demand for the fuel each produces." "Delinquencies and foreclosure rates are now at pre-crash levels as the benefits of higher home prices, improving economic fundamentals and years of cautious underwriting are being felt across the country," said Anand Nallathambi, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "Longer term, as loans made since 2009 account for a larger share of outstanding debt, we anticipate that the serious delinquency rate will have further substantive declines." Additional March 2016 highlights: On a month-over-month basis, completed foreclosures increased by 9.3 percent to 36,000 in March 2016 from the 33,000 reported for February 2016.* As a basis of comparison, before the decline in the housing market in 2007, completed foreclosures averaged 21,000 per month nationwide between 2000 and 2006. On a month-over-month basis, the foreclosure inventory was down 2.2 percent in March 2016 compared with  February 2016. The five states with the highest number of completed foreclosures for the 12 months ending in March 2016 were Florida (69,000), Michigan (48,000), Texas (28,000), Georgia (23,000) and California (23,000). These five states accounted for about 41 percent of all completed foreclosures nationally. Four states and the District of Columbia had the lowest number of completed foreclosures for the 12 months ending in March 2016: The District of Columbia (114), North Dakota (311), West Virginia (541), Wyoming (634) and Alaska (644). Four states and the District of Columbia had the highest foreclosure inventory as a percentage of all mortgaged homes in March 2016: New Jersey (4.0 percent), New York (3.3 percent), Hawaii (2.3 percent), the District of Columbia (2.2 percent) and Florida (2.1 percent). The five states with the lowest foreclosure inventory rate in March 2016 were Alaska (0.3 percent), Minnesota (0.4 percent), Arizona (0.4 percent), Colorado (0.4 percent) and Utah (0.4 percent). *February 2016 data was revised. Revisions are standard, and to ensure accuracy CoreLogic incorporates newly released data to provide updated results. For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog: http://www.corelogic.com/blog. About CoreLogic CoreLogic is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled services provider. The company's combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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Q1 2016 Foreclosure Activity Below Pre-Recession Levels in 36 Percent of U.S. Housing Markets
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CoreLogic Reports 34,000 Completed Foreclosures in February 2016
  April 12, 2016, Irvine, Calif. – CoreLogic®, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled services provider, today released its February 2016 National Foreclosure Report which shows the foreclosure inventory declined by 23.9 percent and completed foreclosures declined by 10 percent compared with February 2015. The number of completed foreclosures nationwide decreased year over year from 38,000 in February 2015 to 34,000 in February 2016. The number of completed foreclosures in February 2016 was down 71.3 percent from the peak of 117,776 in September 2010. The foreclosure inventory represents the number of homes at some stage of the foreclosure process and completed foreclosures reflect the total number of homes lost to foreclosure. Since the financial crisis began in September 2008, there have been approximately 6.2 million completed foreclosures across the country, and since homeownership rates peaked in the second quarter of 2004, there have been approximately 8.2 million homes lost to foreclosure. As of February 2016, the national foreclosure inventory included approximately 434,000, or 1.1 percent, of all homes with a mortgage compared with 571,000 homes, or 1.5 percent, in February 2015. The February 2016 foreclosure inventory rate is the lowest for any month since November 2007. CoreLogic also reports that the number of mortgages in serious delinquency (defined as 90 days or more past due including loans in foreclosure or REO) declined by 19.9 percent from February 2015 to February 2016, with 1.3 million mortgages, or 3.2 percent, in this category. The February 2016 serious delinquency rate is the lowest in eight years, since November 2007. "Job creation averaged 207,000 during the first two months of 2016, and incomes grew over the past year," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. "More income and improved household finances have helped bring serious delinquency rates down in nearly every state.  However, serious delinquency rates increased in North Dakota and West Virginia, two states affected by price declines for the energy fuel each produces." "Home price gains have clearly been a driving force in building positive equity for homeowners," said Anand Nallathambi, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "Longer term, we anticipate a better balance of supply with demand in many markets which will help sustain heathy and affordable home values into the future." Additional February 2016 highlights: On a month-over-month basis, completed foreclosures decreased by 13.9 percent to 34,000 in February 2016 from the 39,000 reported for January 2016.* As a basis of comparison, before the decline in the housing market in 2007, completed foreclosures averaged 21,000 per month nationwide between 2000 and 2006. On a month-over-month basis, the foreclosure inventory was down 2.6 percent in February 2016 compared to January 2016. The five states with the highest number of completed foreclosures for the 12 months ending in February 2016 were Florida (72,000), Michigan (49,000), Texas (29,000), California (25,000) and Ohio (23,000). These five states accounted for almost half of all completed foreclosures nationally. Four states and the District of Columbia had the lowest number of completed foreclosures for the 12 months ending in February 2016: The District of Columbia (113), North Dakota (312), Wyoming (574), West Virginia (627) and Alaska (682). Four states and the District of Columbia had the highest foreclosure inventory rates in February 2016: New Jersey (4.0 percent), New York (3.4 percent), Hawaii (2.3 percent), Florida (2.2 percent) and the District of Columbia (2.2 percent). The five states with the lowest foreclosure inventory rate in February 2016 were Alaska (0.3 percent), Minnesota (0.4 percent), Arizona (0.4 percent), Colorado (0.4 percent) and Utah (0.4 percent). *January 2016 data was revised. Revisions are standard, and to ensure accuracy CoreLogic incorporates newly released data to provide updated results. For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog: http://www.corelogic.com/blog. Methodology The data in this report represents foreclosure activity reported through January 2016. This report separates state data into judicial versus non-judicial foreclosure state categories. In judicial foreclosure states, lenders must provide evidence to the courts of delinquency in order to move a borrower into foreclosure. In non-judicial foreclosure states, lenders can issue notices of default directly to the borrower without court intervention. This is an important distinction since judicial states, as a rule, have longer foreclosure timelines, thus affecting foreclosure statistics. A completed foreclosure occurs when a property is auctioned and results in the purchase of the home at auction by either a third party, such as an investor, or by the lender. If the home is purchased by the lender, it is moved into the lender's real estate-owned (REO) inventory. In "foreclosure by advertisement" states, a redemption period begins after the auction and runs for a statutory period, e.g., six months. During that period, the borrower may regain the foreclosed home by paying all amounts due as calculated under the statute. For purposes of this Foreclosure Report, because so few homes are actually redeemed following an auction, it is assumed that the foreclosure process ends in "foreclosure by advertisement" states at the completion of the auction. The foreclosure inventory represents the number and share of mortgaged homes that have been placed into the process of foreclosure by the mortgage servicer. Mortgage servicers start the foreclosure process when the mortgage reaches a specific level of serious delinquency as dictated by the investor for the mortgage loan. Once a foreclosure is "started," and absent the borrower paying all amounts necessary to halt the foreclosure, the home remains in foreclosure until the completed foreclosure results in the sale to a third party at auction or the home enters the lender's REO inventory. The data in this report accounts for only first liens against a property and does not include secondary liens. The foreclosure inventory is measured only against homes that have an outstanding mortgage. Generally, homes with no mortgage liens are not subject to foreclosure and are, therefore, excluded from the analysis. Approximately one-third of homes nationally are owned outright and do not have a mortgage. CoreLogic has approximately 85 percent coverage of U.S. foreclosure data. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX) is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled services provider. The company's combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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January Mortgage Data: Delinquencies Up Sharply; Prepayment Rate Drops
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CoreLogic Reports 32,000 Completed Foreclosures in December 2015
  February 09, 2016, Irvine, California — CoreLogic®, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled services provider, today released its December 2015 National Foreclosure Report which shows the foreclosure inventory declined by 23.8 percent and completed foreclosures declined by 22.6 percent compared with December 2014. The number of completed foreclosures nationwide decreased year over year from 41,000 in December 2014 to 32,000 in December 2015. The number of completed foreclosures in December 2015 was down 72.8 percent from the peak of 117,722 in September 2010. The foreclosure inventory represents the number of homes at some stage of the foreclosure process and completed foreclosures reflect the total number of homes lost to foreclosure. Since the financial crisis began in September 2008, there have been approximately 6.1 million completed foreclosures across the country, and since homeownership rates peaked in the second quarter of 2004, there have been about 8 million homes lost to foreclosure. As of December 2015, the national foreclosure inventory included approximately 433,000, or 1.1 percent, of all homes with a mortgage compared with 568,000 homes, or 1.5 percent, in December 2014. The December 2015 foreclosure inventory rate is the lowest for any month since November 2007. CoreLogic also reports that the number of mortgages in serious delinquency (defined as 90 days or more past due, including loans in foreclosure or REO) declined by 23.3 percent from December 2014 to December 2015, with 1.2 million mortgages, or 3.2 percent, in this category. The December 2015 serious delinquency rate is the lowest in eight years, since November 2007. “Reflecting on the full-year foreclosure results for 2015, we can see that completed foreclosures are down more than 20 percent for the year, which is the lowest level since 2006, before the crisis,” said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. “Maryland, which can be described as a suburb of the solid D.C. market, led the way with a 59-percent decline in foreclosures in 2015.” “The supply of distressed inventory continues to shrink rapidly. While this is positive for the housing market overall, it also drives a decline in the inventory of affordable for-sale homes,” said Anand Nallathambi, president and CEO of CoreLogic. “The lack of housing stock, particularly affordable inventory, is a growing issue and will limit a full housing recovery in the short to medium term.” Additional December 2015 highlights: On a month-over-month basis, completed foreclosures declined by 5.6 percent to 32,000 in December 2015 from the 34,000 reported in November 2015.* As a basis of comparison, before the decline in the housing market in 2007, completed foreclosures averaged 21,000 per month nationwide between 2000 and 2006. The five states with the highest number of completed foreclosures for the 12 months ending in December 2015 were Florida (79,000), Michigan (50,000), Texas (30,000), Ohio (24,000) and Georgia (24,000). These five states accounted for almost half of all completed foreclosures nationally. Four states and the District of Columbia had the lowest number of completed foreclosures for the 12 months ending in December 2015: the District of Columbia (81), North Dakota (220), Wyoming (541), West Virginia (560) and Alaska (700). Four states and the District of Columbia had the highest foreclosure inventory rate in December 2015: New Jersey (4.2 percent), New York (3.5 percent), Hawaii (2.4 percent), the District of Columbia (2.3 percent) and Florida (2.3 percent). The five states with the lowest foreclosure inventory rate in December 2015 were Alaska (0.3 percent), Minnesota (0.3 percent), Colorado (0.4 percent), Arizona (0.4 percent) and Utah (0.4 percent). *November 2015 data was revised. Revisions are standard, and to ensure accuracy CoreLogic incorporates newly released data to provide updated results. To download a copy of the National Foreclosure Report, please visit: CoreLogic Foreclosure Report December 2015 For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog: http://www.corelogic.com/blog. Methodology The data in this report represents foreclosure activity reported through December 2015. This report separates state data into judicial versus non-judicial foreclosure state categories. In judicial foreclosure states, lenders must provide evidence to the courts of delinquency in order to move a borrower into foreclosure. In non-judicial foreclosure states, lenders can issue notices of default directly to the borrower without court intervention. This is an important distinction since judicial states, as a rule, have longer foreclosure timelines, thus affecting foreclosure statistics. A completed foreclosure occurs when a property is auctioned and results in the purchase of the home at auction by either a third party, such as an investor, or by the lender. If the home is purchased by the lender, it is moved into the lender’s real estate-owned (REO) inventory. In “foreclosure by advertisement” states, a redemption period begins after the auction and runs for a statutory period, e.g., six months. During that period, the borrower may regain the foreclosed home by paying all amounts due as calculated under the statute. For purposes of this Foreclosure Report, because so few homes are actually redeemed following an auction, it is assumed that the foreclosure process ends in “foreclosure by advertisement” states at the completion of the auction. The foreclosure inventory represents the number and share of mortgaged homes that have been placed into the process of foreclosure by the mortgage servicer. Mortgage servicers start the foreclosure process when the mortgage reaches a specific level of serious delinquency as dictated by the investor for the mortgage loan. Once a foreclosure is “started,” and absent the borrower paying all amounts necessary to halt the foreclosure, the home remains in foreclosure until the completed foreclosure results in the sale to a third party at auction or the home enters the lender’s REO inventory. The data in this report accounts for only first liens against a property and does not include secondary liens. The foreclosure inventory is measured only against homes that have an outstanding mortgage. Generally, homes with no mortgage liens are not subject to foreclosure and are, therefore, excluded from the analysis. Approximately one-third of homes nationally are owned outright and do not have a mortgage. CoreLogic has approximately 85 percent coverage of U.S. foreclosure data. About CoreLogic CoreLogic is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled services provider. The company’s combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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Black Knight Financial Services' First Look at November Mortgage Data: Foreclosure Starts Hit Nine-Year Low; Fewer than 700,000 Active Foreclosures Remain
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CoreLogic Reports 37,000 Completed Foreclosures in October 2015
  December 08, 2015, Irvine, Californa — CoreLogic®, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled services provider, today released its October 2015 National Foreclosure Report which shows the foreclosure inventory declined by 21.5 percent and completed foreclosures declined by 27.1 percent compared with October 2014. The number of completed foreclosures nationwide decreased year over year from 51,000 in October 2014 to 37,000 in October 2015. The number of completed foreclosures in October 2015 was down 68.2 percent from the peak of 117,543 in September 2010. The foreclosure inventory is the share of all homes at some stage of the foreclosure process, and completed foreclosures reflect the total number of homes actually lost to foreclosure. Since the financial crisis began in September 2008, there have been approximately 6 million completed foreclosures across the country, and since homeownership rates peaked in the second quarter of 2004, there have been about 8 million homes lost to foreclosure. As of October 2015, the national foreclosure inventory included approximately 463,000, or 1.2 percent, of all homes with a mortgage compared with 589,000 homes, or 1.5 percent, in October 2014. This is lowest rate since November 2007. CoreLogic also reports that the number of mortgages in serious delinquency (defined as 90 days or more past due, including those loans in foreclosure or REO) declined by 19.7 percent from October 2014 to October 2015 with 1.3 million mortgages, or 3.4 percent, in this category. This is the lowest serious delinquency rate since December 2007. "Improved economic conditions and more foreclosure completions have pushed the foreclosure rate lower," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist for CoreLogic. "The national unemployment rate declined to 5.0 percent in October, the lowest since December 2007, and the CoreLogic national Home Price Index has risen 37 percent from its trough." "We are heading into 2016 with the lowest foreclosure inventory in eight years thanks to escalating home values and progressive improvement in the U.S. economy. A large proportion of the remaining foreclosure inventory is clustered in New York, New Jersey and Florida," said Anand Nallathambi, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "Equally encouraging is the drop in mortgage delinquency rates reflecting the stronger labor market and tighter underwriting since 2009." Additional October 2015 highlights: On a month-over-month basis, completed foreclosures decreased by 12.3 percent to 37,000 from the 43,000 reported in September 2015.* As a basis of comparison, before the decline in the housing market in 2007, completed foreclosures averaged 21,000 per month nationwide between 2000 and 2006. The five states with the highest number of completed foreclosures for the 12 months ending in October 2015 were Florida (86,000), Michigan (59,000), Texas (30,000), Georgia (25,000) and California (24,000).These five states accounted for almost half of all completed foreclosures nationally. Four states and the District of Columbia had the lowest number of completed foreclosures for the 12 months ending in October 2015: the District of Columbia (76), North Dakota (239), Wyoming (515), West Virginia (571) and Hawaii (700). Four states and the District of Columbia had the highest foreclosure inventory rate in October 2015: New Jersey (4.5 percent), New York (3.6 percent), Hawaii (2.5 percent), Florida (2.5 percent) and the District of Columbia (2.3 percent). The five states with the lowest foreclosure inventory rate in October 2015 were Alaska (0.4 percent), Arizona (0.4 percent), Minnesota (0.4 percent), North Dakota (0.4 percent) and Colorado (0.4 percent). *September 2015 data was revised. Revisions are standard, and to ensure accuracy CoreLogic incorporates newly released data to provide updated results. To download a copy of the National Foreclosure Report, please visit: CoreLogic Foreclosure Report October 2015 For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog: http://www.corelogic.com/blog. Methodology The data in this report represents foreclosure activity reported through October 2015. This report separates state data into judicial versus non-judicial foreclosure state categories. In judicial foreclosure states, lenders must provide evidence to the courts of delinquency in order to move a borrower into foreclosure. In non-judicial foreclosure states, lenders can issue notices of default directly to the borrower without court intervention. This is an important distinction since judicial states, as a rule, have longer foreclosure timelines, thus affecting foreclosure statistics. A completed foreclosure occurs when a property is auctioned and results in the purchase of the home at auction by either a third party, such as an investor, or by the lender. If the home is purchased by the lender, it is moved into the lender's real estate-owned (REO) inventory. In "foreclosure by advertisement" states, a redemption period begins after the auction and runs for a statutory period, e.g., six months. During that period, the borrower may regain the foreclosed home by paying all amounts due as calculated under the statute. For purposes of this Foreclosure Report, because so few homes are actually redeemed following an auction, it is assumed that the foreclosure process ends in "foreclosure by advertisement" states at the completion of the auction. The foreclosure inventory represents the number and share of mortgaged homes that have been placed into the process of foreclosure by the mortgage servicer. Mortgage servicers start the foreclosure process when the mortgage reaches a specific level of serious delinquency as dictated by the investor for the mortgage loan. Once a foreclosure is "started," and absent the borrower paying all amounts necessary to halt the foreclosure, the home remains in foreclosure until the completed foreclosure results in the sale to a third party at auction or the home enters the lender's REO inventory. The data in this report accounts for only first liens against a property and does not include secondary liens. The foreclosure inventory is measured only against homes that have an outstanding mortgage. Generally, homes with no mortgage liens are not subject to foreclosure and are, therefore, excluded from the analysis. Approximately one-third of homes nationally are owned outright and do not have a mortgage. CoreLogic has approximately 85 percent coverage of U.S. foreclosure data. Source: CoreLogic The data provided is for use only by the primary recipient or the primary recipient's publication or broadcast. This data may not be re-sold, republished or licensed to any other source, including publications and sources owned by the primary recipient's parent company without prior written permission from CoreLogic. Any CoreLogic data used for publication or broadcast, in whole or in part, must be sourced as coming from CoreLogic, a data and analytics company. For use with broadcast or web content, the citation must directly accompany first reference of the data. If the data is illustrated with maps, charts, graphs or other visual elements, the CoreLogic logo must be included on screen or website. Data provided may not be modified without the prior written permission of CoreLogic. Do not use the data in any unlawful manner. This data is compiled from public records, contributory databases and proprietary analytics, and its accuracy is dependent upon these sources. About CoreLogic CoreLogic is a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled services provider. The company's combined data from public, contributory and proprietary sources includes over 4.5 billion records spanning more than 50 years, providing detailed coverage of property, mortgages and other encumbrances, consumer credit, tenancy, location, hazard risk and related performance information. The markets CoreLogic serves include real estate and mortgage finance, insurance, capital markets, and the public sector. CoreLogic delivers value to clients through unique data, analytics, workflow technology, advisory and managed services. Clients rely on CoreLogic to help identify and manage growth opportunities, improve performance and mitigate risk. Headquartered in Irvine, Calif., CoreLogic operates in North America, Western Europe and Asia Pacific. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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U.S. Foreclosure Starts at Lowest Level in More Than 10 Years According to RealtyTrac November Foreclosure Report
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity Increases 7 Percent in July as Bank Repossessions Reach 30-Month High
IRVINE, CA--(August 20, 2015) - RealtyTrac®, the nation's leading source for comprehensive housing data, today released its July 2015 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report™, which shows a total of 124,910 U.S. properties with foreclosure filings -- default notices, scheduled auctions and bank repossessions -- in July, up 7 percent from the previous month and up 14 percent from a year ago. July was the fifth consecutive month with a year-over-year increase in overall foreclosure activity following 53 consecutive months of decreases. "The increase in overall foreclosure activity over the last five months has been driven primarily by rapidly rising bank repossessions, which in July reached the highest level since January 2013," said Daren Blomquist, vice president at RealtyTrac. "Meanwhile foreclosure starts in July were at the lowest level since November 2005 -- a nearly 10-year low that demonstrates the recent rise in bank repossessions represents banks flushing out old distress rather than new distress being pushed into the pipeline. "This clearing of old distress is evident in the fact that properties foreclosed in the second quarter had been in the foreclosure process an average of 629 days, the longest in any quarter since we began tracking in the first quarter of 2007," Blomquist continued. "It's also evident that the recent surge in REOs is in fact clearing out more of the bad bubble-era loans from the so-called shadow inventory. RealtyTrac data now shows 61 percent of loans still in the foreclosure process were originated during the housing bubble years of 2004 to 2008, down from 68 percent last year and 75 percent two years ago." Bank repossessions at 30-month high, increase annually in 44 states There were a total of 46,957 properties repossessed by lenders (REO) in July, up 29 percent from previous month and up 81 percent from a year ago to highest level since January 2013. Despite the recent increases, REOs in July were still less than half their peak of 102,134 in September 2010, but more than twice their pre-crisis average of 23,119 a month in 2005 and 2006. REOs increased from a year ago in 44 states in July, including Florida (up 78 percent), California (up 23 percent), Texas (up 187 percent), Georgia (up 87 percent), Michigan (up 129 percent), Ohio (up 69 percent), and New Jersey (up 344 percent). "The remnants of our South Florida distressed market are seen in the strong REO numbers -- double what they were last year," said Mike Pappas, CEO and president of the Keyes Company covering the South Florida market. "The short sales have basically been eliminated and our long judicial system is finally clearing out the last vestiges of these REO properties." "It's a great time for banks to move inventory. The foundation of the distress market has returned to somewhat normal levels, allowing banks to flush out the hardest deals that haven't gotten resolved quite yet," said Mark Hughes, chief operating officer with First Team Real Estate, covering the Southern California market. "These workouts won't provide any more undue pressure on pricing as a regular percentage of distress is part of an overall healthy market process." Foreclosure starts below pre-crisis levels, down annually in 31 states There were a total of 45,381 U.S. properties that started the foreclosure process for the first time in July, down 8 percent from the previous month and down 9 percent from a year ago to the lowest level since November 2005 -- a nearly 10-year low. Foreclosure starts in July were less than one-fourth of their peak of 203,948 in April 2009 and below their pre-crisis average of 52,279 a month in 2005 and 2006. Foreclosure starts decreased from a year ago in 31 states in July, including California (down 25 percent), New York (down 19 percent), Texas (down 40 percent), Illinois (down 18 percent), Georgia (down 24 percent), Ohio (down 22 percent), Michigan (down 37 percent), and Maryland (down 15 percent). "Many of the Ohio markets have been fortunate with continued growth in sales volumes, increased employment numbers, and moderately increasing prices that are contributing factors to an overall reduction in foreclosure numbers across Ohio," said Michael Mahon, president at HER Realtors, covering the Cincinnati, Dayton and Columbus markets in Ohio. "As days on market have remained fairly low across the state, we are seeing many lending servicers acting quickly to establish communications with delinquent homeowners, and assist them in avoiding the foreclosure process." States with increasing foreclosure starts -- bucking the national trend -- included Massachusetts (up 130 percent), New Jersey (up 76 percent), Missouri (up 72 percent), Wisconsin (up 27 percent), and Florida (up 16 percent). Scheduled foreclosure auctions down after two months of increases A total of 48,124 U.S. properties were scheduled for a future foreclosure auction in July, down 1 percent from the previous month and down 7 percent from a year ago following two consecutive months of year-over-year increases. Scheduled foreclosure auctions in July were less than one-third of their peak of 158,105 in March 2010 but still above their pre-crisis average of 33,634 a month in 2005 and 2006. Scheduled foreclosure auctions -- which are foreclosure starts in some states where they are the first public notice of foreclosure -- increased from a year ago in 25 states, including New York (up 157 percent), New Jersey (up 101 percent), Massachusetts (up 54 percent), Connecticut (up 45 percent), Nevada (up 23 percent), Virginia (up 21 percent), and Illinois (up 19 percent). 13 of 20 largest U.S. metros post annual increase in foreclosure activity Among the nation's 20 largest metropolitan statistical areas by population, 13 posted year-over-year increases in overall foreclosure activity, led by St. Louis (up 148 percent), Boston (up 78 percent), New York (up 59 percent), Detroit (up 42 percent) and Philadelphia (up 40 percent). Major markets with annual decreases in foreclosure activity in July were Houston (down 33 percent), Phoenix (down 23 percent), Riverside-San Bernardino (down 12 percent), Los Angeles (down 11 percent), Minneapolis (down 8 percent), San Diego (down 5 percent), and Chicago (down 2 percent). Miami posted the highest foreclosure rate in July among the 20 largest metro areas. One in every 339 Miami housing units had a foreclosure filing in July -- more than three times the national average of one in every 1,057 housing units with a foreclosure filing. With one in every 375 housing units with a foreclosure filing, Tampa posted the second highest foreclosure rate among the 20 largest metro areas in July, followed by Baltimore (one in every 495 housing units), Chicago (one in every 586 housing units), and Philadelphia (one in every 627 housing units). Atlantic city posts highest metro foreclosure rate, eight Florida cities in top 10 With one in every 258 housing units with a foreclosure filing in July -- more than four times the national average -- Atlantic City, New Jersey posted the highest foreclosure rate among metropolitan statistical areas with a population of 200,000 or more. Eight Florida metros were in the top 10 for foreclosure rates in July: Jacksonville (one in every 310 housing units with a foreclosure filing), Miami (one in every 339 housing units), Lakeland-Winter Haven (one in every 349 housing units), Deltona-Daytona Beach-Ormond (one in every 358 housing units), Tampa (one in every 375 housing units), Port St. Lucie (one in every 410 housing units), Orlando (one in every 433 housing units), and Palm Bay-Melbourne-Titusville (one in every 437 housing units). Florida, Maryland, New Jersey post highest state foreclosure rates Florida foreclosure starts increased 16 percent from a year ago in July following 10 consecutive months of year-over-year decreases, helping the state maintain the nation's top foreclosure rate for the fifth month in a row. One in every 408 Florida housing units had a foreclosure filing in July -- more than 2.5 times then national average. Maryland foreclosure activity increased 8 percent from a year ago in July -- the fourth consecutive month with a year-over-year increase -- and the state posted the nation's second highest foreclosure rate for the second month in a row. One in every 513 Maryland housing units had a foreclosure filing during the month. New Jersey foreclosure activity increased 129 percent from a year ago in July -- the fifth consecutive month with a year-over-year increase -- and the state posted the nation's third highest foreclosure rate for the second month in a row. One in every 520 New Jersey housing units had a foreclosure filing during the month. Nevada foreclosure activity increased 10 percent from a year ago, and the state posted the nation's fourth highest foreclosure rate -- one in every 587 housing units with a foreclosure filing. Illinois foreclosure activity increased 2 percent from a year ago, and the state posted the nation's fifth highest state foreclosure rate -- one in every 730 housing units with a foreclosure filing. Other states with foreclosure rates among the top 10 nationwide were New Mexico at No. 6 (one in every 741 housing units with a foreclosure filing), Georgia at No. 7 (one in every 900 housing units), South Carolina at No. 8 (one in every 923 housing units), Ohio at No. 9 (one in every 932 housing units), and North Carolina at No. 10 (one in every 970 housing units). Report methodology The RealtyTrac U.S. Foreclosure Market Report provides a count of the total number of properties with at least one foreclosure filing entered into the RealtyTrac database during the month - broken out by type of filing. Some foreclosure filings entered into the database during the month may have been recorded in previous months. Data is collected from more than 2,200 counties nationwide, and those counties account for more than 90 percent of the U.S. population. RealtyTrac's report incorporates documents filed in all three phases of foreclosure: Default - Notice of Default (NOD) and Lis Pendens (LIS); Auction - Notice of Trustee's Sale and Notice of Foreclosure Sale (NTS and NFS); and Real Estate Owned, or REO properties (that have been foreclosed on and repurchased by a bank). The report does not count a property again if it receives the same type of foreclosure filing multiple times within the estimated foreclosure timeframe for the state where the property is located. Special methodology note on REOs In the first quarter of 2015, RealtyTrac started receiving REO data from a new source that provides the data more quickly in some cases than other sources. This new source may be resulting in some REOs reported by RealtyTrac in the first six months of 2015 that would have been reported in subsequent months using other sources. As always, if RealtyTrac receives an REO filing (or any other foreclosure filing type) on the same property from multiple sources, or from the same source multiple times, that REO filing is only counted in the RealtyTrac U.S. Foreclosure Market Report the first time it is received. About RealtyTrac RealtyTrac is a leading provider of comprehensive U.S. housing and property data, including nationwide parcel-level records for more than 130 million U.S. properties. Detailed data attributes include property characteristics, tax assessor data, sales and mortgage deed records, distressed data, including default, foreclosure and auctions status, and Automated Valuation Models (AVMs). Sourced from RealtyTrac subsidiary Homefacts.com, the company's proprietary national neighborhood-level database includes more than 50 key local and neighborhood level dynamics for residential properties, providing unrivaled pre-diligence capabilities and a parcel risk database for portfolio analysis. RealtyTrac's data is widely viewed as the industry standard and, as such, is relied upon by real estate professionals and service providers, marketers and financial institutions, as well as the Federal Reserve, U.S. Treasury Department, HUD, state housing and banking departments, investment funds and tens of millions of consumers.
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Rise in Bank Repossessions Fuels 1 Percent Increase in Foreclosure Activity to 19-Month High in May
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Homeowner-Vacated "Zombie" Foreclosures Nationwide Down 10 Percent From a Year Ago in Q2 2015
IRVINE, CA--(June 11, 2015) - RealtyTrac®, the nation's leading source for comprehensive housing data, today released its Q2 2015 Zombie Foreclosure Report, which found that 127,021 homes actively in the foreclosure process had been vacated by the homeowners prior to a completed foreclosure, representing 24 percent of all active foreclosures. These owner-vacated foreclosure properties will likely end up as short sales, foreclosure auction sales or bank-owned sales in the future. The total number of zombie foreclosures was down 11 percent from previous quarter and down 10 percent from Q2 2014. Zombie foreclosures represented 24 percent of the 527,047 U.S. properties in foreclosure. One in every 1,040 U.S. housing units was an owner-vacated zombie foreclosure. "A growing number of states and cities have enacted public policy measures to combat the problem of zombie foreclosures, and we are seeing the results of those efforts in the overall decrease nationwide as well as in several hard-hit markets such as Chicago, Miami and Cleveland," said Daren Blomquist, vice president at RealtyTrac. "Still, as banks push through long-deferred foreclosures that are more likely to be owner-vacated this year, we are seeing a somewhat surprising increase in zombie foreclosures in markets with overall low foreclosure rates such as Los Angeles, Houston and Boston. "The average estimated market value of an owner-vacated foreclosure is 22 percent below the average estimated market value of an owner-occupied foreclosure, indicating that it is in a foreclosing bank's best interest to have a home occupied during the foreclosure process and also demonstrating how these zombies are contributing to blight in neighborhoods across the country." Highest rates of zombie foreclosures in New Jersey, Florida and New York markets The highest zombie foreclosure rates among the 183 metro areas analyzed in the report were in Atlantic City, New Jersey (one in 130 housing units), Trenton, New Jersey (one in 166 housing units), Tampa, Florida (one in 218 housing units), Binghamton, New York (one in every 260 housing units), and Ocala, Florida (one in every 262 housing units). Among the states the highest zombie foreclosure rates were in New Jersey (one in every 210 housing units), Florida (one in every 324 housing units), New York (one in every 476 housing units), Nevada (one in every 495 housing units), and Indiana (one in every 574 housing units). Zombies still up from a year ago in half of U.S. metros Zombies still increased in 91 of the 183 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in this report. Major markets where the number of zombies increased from a year ago included New York (up 38 percent), Los Angeles (up 39 percent), Houston (38 percent), Philadelphia (up 19 percent), and Boston (up 14 percent). "We are at the end of a long workout cycle and the distress inventory being processed by banks here are an aggregation of tough foreclosure transactions that have typically evolved with starts and stops to the process but in reality the outcome for these REOs has been known for a while," said Mark Hughes, chief operating officer with First Team Real Estate, covering the Southern California market. "As such the owners have moved on and left these zombie foreclosures to deteriorate and limp along until a new owner brings new blood." "I suspect that the reason we're seeing slightly more zombie foreclosures in Seattle is because our market is appreciating; therefore, banks are hanging onto these properties longer in order to recoup more of the funds they are owed," said OB Jacobi, president of Windermere Real Estate, covering the Seattle market, where zombie foreclosures increased 4 percent from the previous quarter but were still down 11 percent from a year ago. Major markets where the number of zombies decreased from a year ago included Chicago (down 28 percent), Dallas (down 27 percent), Miami (down 46 percent), Atlanta (down 33 percent), and Phoenix (down 14 percent). "In South Florida, we continue to see a dramatic improvement in the foreclosure arena. Zombie foreclosures have dropped 46 percent year-over-year. The wheels of our judicial process turn slowly, but the good news is we are in the last rounds of this fight," said Mike Pappas, CEO and president of the Keyes Company, covering the South Florida market. "Occupied homes always outperform vacated properties. It behooves the banks to work with the homeowners to maximize the property value for all." Zombie values lower, square footage smaller and have more deceased homeowners The average market value of an owner-vacated zombie foreclosure in the second quarter was $195,856, 78 percent (or 22 percent below) the average market value of owner-occupied foreclosures ($251,236). Major where owner-vacated foreclosure values were furthest below owner-occupied foreclosure values were Detroit (25 percent), Seattle (18 percent), Houston (16 percent), Washington, D.C. (16 percent), Minneapolis-St. Paul (15 percent), and Columbus, Ohio (15 percent). "As Ohio homeowners continue to experience increased appreciation of home values, and decreasing days on market for available inventory, foreclosure numbers continue to decrease across the state. For those homeowners facing economic troubles caused by job loss, divorce, or untimely death of a family member, an important aspect to remember is communicating with a Realtor early in the process rather than vacating the home," said Michael Mahon, president at HER Realtors, covering the Cincinnati, Dayton and Columbus markets in Ohio. "There are many more options available in today's housing market for homeowners and engaging a knowledgeable Realtor representative early in the process can potentially save troubled homeowners time, money, and potential credit and foreclosure actions." The average square footage of an owner-vacated zombie foreclosure in the second quarter was 1,718, 92 percent of the average square footage of owner-occupied foreclosures (1,873) and 6 percent of all owner-vacated zombie foreclosures involved a deceased homeowner, compared to 3 percent of all owner-occupied foreclosures with a deceased homeowner. Financial institutions with the most zombie foreclosures Financial institutions listed as the beneficiary on the foreclosure documents with the most zombie foreclosures were Wells Fargo (16,171), Bank of America (9,543), US Bank (8,278), JP Morgan (7,519) and NationStar Mortgage (6,560). Methodology RealtyTrac gathers data for vacant foreclosures by matching foreclosures in the RealtyTrac database with data collected from the United States Postal Service for addresses that the agency has deemed vacant or where the owner has requested a change of address. About RealtyTrac RealtyTrac is a leading supplier of U.S. real estate data, with nationwide parcel-level records for more than 130 million U.S. parcels that include property characteristics, tax assessor data, sales and mortgage deed records, Automated Valuation Models (AVMs) and 20 million active and historical default, foreclosure auction and bank-owned properties. RealtyTrac's housing data and foreclosure reports are relied on by the Federal Reserve, U.S. Treasury Department, HUD, numerous state housing and banking departments, investment funds as well as millions of real estate professionals and consumers, to help evaluate housing trends and make informed decisions about real estate.
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity Increases 3 Percent in April to 18-Month High Driven by Rising Bank Repossessions
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Black Knight Financial Services' "First Look" at February Mortgage Data: Foreclosure Inventory Reaches Lowest Level Since 2007
JACKSONVILLE, Fla., March 23, 2015 -- The Data and Analytics division of Black Knight Financial Services reports the following "first look" at February 2015 month-end mortgage performance statistics derived from its loan-level database representing approximately two-thirds of the overall market. *Non-current totals combine foreclosures and delinquencies as a percent of active loans in that state. Notes: Totals are extrapolated based on Black Knight Financial Services' loan-level database of mortgage assets. All whole numbers are rounded to the nearest thousand, except foreclosure starts, which are rounded to the nearest hundred. The company will provide a more in-depth review of this data in its monthly Mortgage Monitor report, which includes an analysis of data supplemented by in-depth charts and graphs that reflect trend and point-in-time observations. The Mortgage Monitor report will be available online at http://www.bkfs.com/CorporateInformation/NewsRoom/Pages/Mortgage-Monitor.aspx by April 6, 2015. About Black Knight Financial Services, LLC Black Knight Financial Services, a Fidelity National Financial (NYSE: FNF) company, is the mortgage and finance industries' leading provider of integrated technology, data and analytics solutions that facilitate and automate many of the business processes across the mortgage lifecycle. Black Knight Financial Services is committed to being the premier business partner that lenders and servicers rely onto achieve their strategic goals, realize greater success and better serve their customers by delivering best-in-class technology, services and insight with a relentless commitment to excellence, innovation, integrity and leadership. For more information on Black Knight Financial Services, please visit www.BKFS.com.
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CoreLogic Reports January 2015 National Foreclosure Inventory Down 33.2 Percent Year Over Year
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21 Percent of U.S. Housing Markets Now Less Affordable Than Their Historical Averages According to New RealtyTrac Report Analyzing Early Warning Signs of Possible Home Price Bubbles
IRVINE, CA--(Dec 4, 2014) - RealtyTrac®, the nation's leading source for comprehensive housing data, today released a report identifying county-level housing markets with early warning signs of a possible home price bubble -- where prices overinflate and eventually decline. The report also identified markets with little risk for a home price bubble. The report analyzed 475 U.S. counties with a combined population of more than 221 million -- accounting for more than 70 percent of the total U.S. population -- based on three early warning signs of a possible home price bubble: if the market was less affordable in October 2014 than its peak price during the 2005 to 2008 housing bubble; if a market was less affordable in October 2014 than its historical affordability average since January 2000; and if a market had a rising foreclosure rate on loans originated in 2014 compared to loans originated in 2013. See full methodology below. In the 475 counties analyzed, buying a median-priced home in October 2014 required 26 percent of median income on average compared to an average of 41 percent of median income in each county's respective peak month during the housing bubble. The historical affordability average going back to January 2000 for all 475 counties was 28 percent of median income needed to purchase a median-priced home. Meanwhile the average foreclosure rate among the 475 counties on loans originated in 2014 was 0.25 percent, up from an average of 0.20 percent for loans originated in 2013. "Affordability and foreclosure rates by loan vintage are two key metrics that will help consumers, investors, institutions and policy makers identify if a housing market is at risk for another price bubble," said Daren Blomquist, vice president at RealtyTrac. "While 99 percent of markets have not returned to the irrational affordability levels during the previous housing bubble, one in five markets have now exceeded their historical affordability norms, which is a strong sign that either a new home price bubble is forming in those markets or that home price appreciation will soon plateau until incomes can catch up. "Meanwhile, foreclosure rates on loans originated in 2014 are still significantly lower than for loans originated during the previous housing bubble in most markets, but there was an uptick in foreclosure rates on 2014 vintage loans compared to 2013 vintage loans in more than one-third of the counties we analyzed," Blomquist continued. "This is concerning given that the 2014 loans are newer and have had less time to sour than loans originated in 2013." 21 percent of counties less affordable than their historical affordability averages There were 98 counties (21 percent of all counties analyzed) with a combined population of nearly 62 million where the October affordability percentage was higher than the county's historical average affordability percentage, including Los Angeles County, Calif., Harris County, Texas in the Houston metro area, Orange County, Calif., in the Los Angeles metro area, Kings County (Brooklyn), N.Y., Dallas County, Texas, Bexar County, Texas in the San Antonio metro area, Alameda County, Calif., in the San Francisco metro area, Middlesex County, Mass., in the Boston metro area, Oakland County, Mich., in the Detroit metro area and Travis County, Texas, in the Austin metro area. 30 counties both unaffordable by historical standards and with rising foreclosure rates There were 30 counties (6 percent of all counties analyzed) with a combined population of nearly 19 million where the October affordability percentage was above the historical average and where foreclosure rates on 2014 vintage loans were higher than foreclosure rates on 2013 vintage loans, including Kings County, N.Y. (Brooklyn), San Francisco, San Mateo and Alameda counties in the San Francisco metro area, Suffolk County in the Boston metro area, Orange County in Southern California, Honolulu County, Hawaii, Denver County, Colo., Washington County, Utah in the St. George metro area, and Deschutes County, Ore., in the Bend metro area. "We expect prices to peak in Q2 2015 before leveling off in the Southern California coastal markets," said Chris Pollinger, senior vice president of sales at First Team Real Estate, covering the Southern California market. 12 percent of counties with higher median prices than peak during 2005 to 2008 bubble There were 58 counties (12 percent of all counties analyzed) with a combined population of more than 26 million where the median price of a home in October was higher than the peak during the housing bubble, including Kings County (Brooklyn) and New York County (Manhattan), N.Y., Travis County, Texas in the Austin metro area, Honolulu County, Hawaii, Fulton County, Ga., in the Atlanta metro area, Mecklenburg County, N.C., in the Charlotte metro area, Erie County, N.Y., in the Buffalo metro area, Wake County, N.C., in the Raleigh metro area, San Francisco County, Calif., and Monroe County, N.Y., in the Rochester metro area. Six counties less affordable than during 2005 to 2008 housing bubble Thanks to lower interest rates and higher incomes in some of the 58 counties, there were only six counties nationwide where a median-priced home in October 2014 was less affordable for median income earners than at the peak of the 2005 to 2008 housing bubble: Suffolk County, Mass., in the Boston metro area, Travis County, Texas, in the Austin metro, Jefferson County, Ala., in the Birmingham metro area, Brazos County, Texas in the College Station metro, Allegan County, Mich., and Montgomery County, Tenn., in the Clarksville metro area. 37 percent of counties with rising foreclosure rates on 2014 vintage loans There were 178 counties (37 percent of all counties analyzed) with a combined population of nearly 100 million where the foreclosure rate on loans originated in 2014 was higher than the foreclosure rate on loans originated in 2013, including Cook County, Ill., in the Chicago metro area, San Diego and Orange counties in Southern California, Kings County (Brooklyn), N.Y., Miami-Dade County, Fla., Queens County, N.Y., Clark County, Nev. (Las Vegas), King County, Wash. (Seattle), Santa Clara County, Calif. (San Jose), and Broward County, Fla. (Miami). "With the stiff competition for homes in Seattle, one might think that our market is well on its way to a bubble, but buyers have gotten more savvy and aren't overbidding at levels we saw a year or two ago," said OB Jacobi, president of Windermere Real Estate, covering the Seattle market. All three counties in the Seattle metro were more affordable than their historical levels in October despite a slight increase in foreclosure rate in two of the three counties. "We also have a strong job market with wages that are keeping up with appreciation -- especially in the growing tech sector. As a result, prices in Seattle are appreciating at a healthy pace, but they've slowed from the double digit increases we saw last year." 48 percent of counties still historically affordable with flat or falling foreclosure rates There were 229 counties (48 percent of all counties analyzed) with a combined population of nearly 79 million where median home prices in October were more affordable than their historical averages and where foreclosure rates on 2014 vintage loans were flat or declining compared to foreclosure rates on 2013 vintage loans. Among these counties with a low risk of a home price bubble, the most affordable were in Lansing, Mich., Syracuse, N.Y., Buffalo, N.Y., Cincinnati, Ohio, and Atlanta, Ga. "The Ohio markets have been fortunate through 2014 in showing continued modest gains regarding volume and prices reflective of a market in balance between home sellers and buyers, in contrast to concerns over a housing bubble being experienced in many other parts of the country," said Michael Mahon, executive vice president and broker at HER Realtors, covering the Columbus, Cincinnati and Dayton, Ohio markets. "Growing job markets within the fields of medical, finance, construction, and education continue to supply increased demand for housing across Ohio, although concerns over consumers with increasing debt issues, particularly in the fragile first time home buyer sector, could provide for a slight decrease in demand for 2015." "We don't have huge swings up and huge swings down. We just kind of plod along," said Tom Hosack, President of Northwood Realty Services, covering Western Pennsylvania, including Pittsburgh, and Eastern Ohio, including Youngstown. Three counties in the Pittsburgh metro -- Fayette, Allegheny and Butler -- were among the markets still affordable by their historical standards and with flat or falling foreclosure rates. "And that's the way we like it around here. This is not the kind of place you're going to get rich on your home but it's also not the kind of place where you're likely to lose money on your home. "People marvel that you can come here and buy a house for eight or 10 thousand dollars," he continued, noting those low prices previously attracted real estate investors to the region, especially since getting qualified for a loan in some of the lowest-priced areas can be challenging. "Certainly we had a fair amount of investors. People could buy 10 homes for $100,000. That has slowed down. What we see now is a fairly healthy market with balanced supply and demand." Report methodology To calculate affordability, RealtyTrac looked at the percentage of median monthly household income required to make a monthly house payment for a median-priced home in each month from January 2000 to October 2014. The median monthly household income was derived from U.S. Census data for 2000 to 2012, with 2013 and 2014 median household income estimated based on the 2000 to 2012 trend and adjusted for current market conditions. The median price of a home was based on the median sales price from sales deeds recorded each month for each county, except for in states with insufficient sales deed data and non-disclosure states where the full sales price is not required to be included on the sales deed. In those states, the median list price of homes listed for sale each month was used instead. The states where the list median price was used include Alaska, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maine, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, North Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming. Also Massachusetts, Connecticut, New Hampshire, Vermont, Delaware and Hawaii all used list median prices. The monthly house payment was calculated using a 10 percent down payment and a 30-year fixed loan and the average interest rate for each month according to the Freddie Mac Primary Mortgage Market Survey, with the inclusion of an additional 1 percent of the median price for private mortgage insurance and an additional 1.39 percent of the median price for property taxes and insurance divided among each year's 12 house payments. The foreclosure rate used in the report is the percentage of homes with a mortgage that were actively in the foreclosure process -- based on default notices (NOD, LIS) and scheduled auction notices (NTS, NFS) collected from public records -- broken down by the year the mortgage was originated. About RealtyTrac RealtyTrac is a leading supplier of U.S. real estate data, with nationwide parcel-level records for more than 129 million U.S. parcels that include property characteristics, tax assessor data, sales and mortgage deed records, Automated Valuation Models (AVMs) and 20 million active and historical default, foreclosure auction and bank-owned properties. RealtyTrac's housing data and foreclosure reports are relied on by the Federal Reserve, U.S. Treasury Department, HUD, numerous state housing and banking departments, investment funds as well as millions of real estate professionals and consumers, to help evaluate housing trends and make informed decisions about real estate.
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity Increases 15 Percent in October Driven by 17-Month High in Scheduled Foreclosure Auctions
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RealtyTrac Foreclosure Data Integrated Into RE/MAX Search
IRVINE, CA, July 11, 2014-- RealtyTrac®, the nation's leading source for comprehensive housing data, and RE/MAX, LLC today announced a new agreement that allows RE/MAX agents and their clients to have real-time access to RealtyTrac's nationwide foreclosure database of default, auction and bank-owned properties, as well as comprehensive neighborhood and housing data from RealtyTrac's proprietary Homefacts data. The strategic data enhancement agreement allows remax.com and its affiliated web properties to leverage RealtyTrac's Homefacts local information to enhance current for-sale listings with neighborhood data points, including school information, neighborhood points of interest, crime statistics, demographics and environmental data. Additionally, RealtyTrac will allow an integrated search and subscription access to its comprehensive database of 1.1 million properties to RE/MAX users. The RealtyTrac foreclosure data is now live on the Remax.com website as a first phase of implementation, with the Homefacts neighborhood and local information to follow. "This is an exciting relationship between RE/MAX, LLC and RealtyTrac," said RealtyTrac Vice President Alan J. Mao. "We believe that a complete perspective is essential in making a truly informed real-estate decision. Now, at remax.com, clients and agents will have access to a comprehensive view of the property marketplace, including 1.1 million foreclosures and soon the neighborhood and local characteristics that truly drive real estate decision-making." "In the ever changing real estate market, we're constantly enhancing our web experience to provide consumers with helpful data for making informed decisions, and our agents with competitive advantages," said Tim Drouillard, Vice President, Information Technology at RE/MAX, LLC. "We're delighted to integrate RealtyTrac's extensive database into remax.com and look forward to a long relationship." For more information on RealtyTrac, visit http://www.realtytrac.com/home/. For more information on RE/MAX LLC, or to search for property listings, visit http://www.remax.com. About the RE/MAX Network RE/MAX was founded in 1973 by Dave and Gail Liniger, with an innovative, entrepreneurial culture affording its agents and franchisees the flexibility to operate their businesses with great independence. Over 94,000 agents provide RE/MAX a global reach of more than 95 countries. Nobody sells more real estate than RE/MAX. RE/MAX, LLC, one of the world's leading franchisors of real estate brokerage services, is a subsidiary of RE/MAX Holdings, Inc. (NYSE: RMAX). With a passion for the communities in which its agents live and work, RE/MAX is proud to have raised more than $140 million for Children's Miracle Network Hospitals®, Susan G. Komen® and other charities. For more information about RE/MAX, to search home listings or find an agent in your community, please visit www.remax.com. About RealtyTrac Inc. RealtyTrac is a leading supplier of U.S. real estate data, with nationwide parcel-level records for more than 125 million U.S. parcels that include property characteristics, tax assessor data, sales and mortgage deed records, Automated Valuation Models (AVMs) and 20 million active and historical default, foreclosure auction and bank-owned properties. RealtyTrac's housing data and foreclosure reports are relied on by many federal government agencies, numerous state housing and banking departments, investment funds as well as millions of real estate professionals and consumers, to help evaluate housing trends and make informed decisions about real estate.
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U.S. Median Home Price Appreciation Accelerates in April as Short Sales and Foreclosure Sales Slow
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity Decreases 10 Percent in February From January Jump to Lowest Level in More Than 7 Years
IRVINE, Calif. – March 13, 2014 — RealtyTrac®, the nation's leading source for comprehensive housing data, today released its U.S. Foreclosure Market Report™ for February 2014, which shows foreclosure filings — default notices, scheduled auctions and bank repossessions — were reported on 112,498 U.S. properties in February, a 10 percent decrease from January and down 27 percent from February 2013 to the lowest monthly total since December 2006 — a more than seven-year low. RealtyTrac also included updated information on the number of owner-vacated properties in the foreclosure process as part of the report. As of the first quarter of 2014, a total of 152,033 U.S. properties in the foreclosure process (excluding bank-owned properties) had been vacated by the distressed homeowner, representing 21 percent of all properties in the foreclosure process. These owner-vacated foreclosures — sometimes called zombie foreclosures — had been in the foreclosure process an average of 1,031 days. "Cold weather and a short month certainly contributed to a seasonal drop in foreclosure activity in February, but the reality is that new activity is no longer the biggest threat to the housing market when it comes to foreclosures," said Daren Blomquist, vice president at RealtyTrac. "The biggest threat from foreclosures going forward is properties that have been lingering in the foreclosure process for years, many of them vacant with neither the distressed homeowner or the foreclosing lender taking responsibility for maintenance and upkeep of the home — or at the very least facilitating a sale to a new homeowner more likely to perform needed upkeep and maintenance. "One in every five homes in the foreclosure process nationwide have been vacated by the distressed homeowner, but it is closer to one in three foreclosures in some cities," Blomquist added. "These properties drag down home values in the surrounding neighborhood and contribute to a climate of uncertainty and low inventory in local housing markets." High-level findings from the report: Owner-vacated foreclosures nationwide were flat compared to the last time RealtyTrac analyzed these properties, in the third quarter of 2013, but some states saw substantial increases, including Michigan (27 percent increase from September 2013), New Jersey (24 percent increase) and Nevada (21 percent increase). States with the most owner-vacated foreclosures were Florida with 54,908 (36 percent of the national total, Illinois (15,512), New York (10,880), New Jersey (8,595), and Ohio (7,780). States with the longest average time in foreclosure for owner-vacated foreclosures included Arkansas (1,128 days), Hawaii (1,112 days), Florida (1,095 days), Nevada (1,055 days), and New York (1,037 days). After a 10 percent month-over-month jump in January, U.S. foreclosure starts retreated to their lowest level since December 2005 — a 98-month low. A total of 51,842 U.S. properties started the foreclosure process for the first time in February, down 9 percent from the previous month and down 27 percent from a year ago. Counter to the national trend, February foreclosure starts increased from a year ago in 14 states, including New Jersey where foreclosure starts increased 126 percent from a year ago, boosting the state's foreclosure rate to fourth highest in the nation — its highest foreclosure rate ranking since October 2005. A total of 47,715 U.S. properties were scheduled for a future foreclosure auction (in some states this is the foreclosure start) in February, down 15 percent from the previous month and down 21 percent from a year ago. Counter to the national trend, scheduled foreclosure auctions increased from a year ago in 19 states, including Oregon (up 389 percent), Utah (up 145 percent), Connecticut (up 141 percent), New Jersey (up 70 percent), and Maryland (up 36 percent). There were a total of 30,307 U.S. bank repossessions (REO) in February, up less than 1 percent from January but still down 33 percent from February 2013. Counter to the national trend, 15 states reported year-over-year increases in bank repossessions in February, including Connecticut (up 162 percent), New York (up 108 percent), Maryland (up 98 percent), New Jersey (up 90 percent), and Oregon (up 70 percent). States with the highest foreclosure rates in February were Florida, Maryland, Nevada, New Jersey and Illinois. Nine of the top 10 metro foreclosure rates in February were posted by cities in Florida, along with Atlantic City, N.J., where overall foreclosure activity increased 254 percent from a year ago. Among the nation's 20 most populated metro areas, the highest foreclosure rates were in Tampa, Miami, Baltimore, Riverside-San Bernardino in Southern California, and Chicago. Only four of the 20 largest metro areas posted annual increases in foreclosure activity: New York (up 77 percent), Philadelphia (up 20 percent), Washington, D.C. (up 19 percent), and Baltimore (up 14 percent). Local broker quotes "Short sales and foreclosures used to account for about 85 percent of the Reno, NV market while home equity accounted for just 15 percent," said Craig King, COO of Chase International, covering the Reno and Lake Tahoe, Nev. markets. "Now those numbers have flipped and we are seeing an increase in home equity and a decrease in the number of total foreclosures." "Distressed properties will continue to be present in our market because there are still a number of people who are upside down on their mortgages, but the housing market is definitely picking up and looking much stronger," added King. "Approximately 8 percent of mortgages in the Utah market were considered underwater, and the number of homes currently in foreclosure represents 1.5 percent of mortgages statewide, which is slightly higher than our historical average of 1 percent," said Steve Roney, CEO of Prudential Utah Real Estate, covering the Salt Lake City and Park City, Utah markets. "But once again, Utah's strong economic outlook, robust job growth and an unemployment rate hovering near 4 percent set a strong foundation for continued real estate expansion." "REO inventory in the Oklahoma housing market is at its lowest level in seven years," said Sheldon Detrick, CEO of Prudential Detrick/Alliance Realty, covering the Oklahoma City and Tulsa, Okla. markets. "Buyer velocity is as strong as ever, and the continuously low inventory levels are leading to multiple, high-paying offers for these types of properties." "The Denver market is certainly normalizing based on the large drop of distressed properties over the past year. The worst of the foreclosure crisis is thankfully behind us, however it's not entirely over as we saw a surge in foreclosure activity early this year, and we predict there may be another month of higher foreclosure activity this summer," said Chad Ochsner, owner/broker of RE/MAX Alliance, covering the Denver, Colo. market. "We are not quite back to pre-recession levels, but Denver remains very healthy and is quickly returning to normal." Florida, Maryland, Nevada post top state foreclosure rates After jumping 19 percent on a month-over-month basis in January Florida foreclosure activity dropped 7 percent from January to February and was down 24 percent on a year-over-year basis — the seventh consecutive month with an annual decrease. Despite the decrease, Florida still posted the nation's top foreclosure rate, with one in every 372 housing units with a foreclosure filing during the month — more than three times the national average. Florida foreclosure starts decreased annually for the 12th consecutive month, and Florida bank repossessions decreased annually for the sixth consecutive month. Scheduled foreclosure auctions in Florida decreased 2 percent annually in February after 13 consecutive months of annual increases. Maryland foreclosure activity increased annually for the 20th consecutive month in February, helping it post the nation's second highest state foreclosure rate — one in every 557 housing units with a foreclosure filing. On a year-over-year basis, Maryland foreclosure starts increased 15 percent, scheduled foreclosure auctions increased 36 percent, and bank repossessions increased 98 percent. Nevada foreclosure activity in February decreased 16 percent from January and was down 49 percent from February 2013, but the state still posted the nation's third highest foreclosure rate — one in every 633 housing units with a foreclosure filing. New Jersey foreclosure activity increased 108 percent annually in February, and the state posted the nation's fourth highest state foreclosure rate — one in every 739 housing units with a foreclosure filing. The No. 4 ranking was the highest ranking for New Jersey since October 2005. Illinois foreclosure activity decreased 48 percent annually in February — the 15th consecutive month with an annual decrease — but the state still posted the nation's fifth highest foreclosure rate: one in every 811 housing units with a foreclosure filing. Other states with foreclosure rates among the nation's 10 highest in February were Connecticut (one in every 898 housing units with a foreclosure filing), Ohio (one in every 941 housing units), South Carolina (one in every 971 housing units), Georgia (one in every 1,011 housing units), and Wisconsin (one in every 1,011 housing units). Metro foreclosure rates and activity Nine of the top 10 foreclosure rates in February among metropolitan statistical areas with a population of 200,000 or more were in Florida, led by Palm Bay-Melbourne-Titusville with one in every 296 housing units with a foreclosure filing during the month — nearly four times the national average. Other Florida metros in the top 10 were Tampa at No. 2 (one in every 318 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Jacksonville at No. 3 (one in every 319 housing units); Miami at No. 4 (one in every 328 housing units); Port St. Lucie at No. 5 (one in every 361 housing units); Orlando at No. 6 (one in every 370 housing units); Ocala at No. 8 (one in every 404 housing units); Tallahassee at No. 9 (one in every 407 housing units); and Lakeland (one in every 410 housing units). Foreclosure activity in Atlantic City, N.J., increased 254 percent on a year-over-year basis — the third consecutive month with a triple-digit percentage annual increase — and the city posted the nation's seventh highest metro foreclosure rate: one in every 398 housing units with a foreclosure filing during the month. About RealtyTrac Inc. RealtyTrac (www.realtytrac.com) is the nation's leading source of comprehensive housing data, with more than 1.5 million active default, foreclosure auction and bank-owned properties, and more than 1 million active for-sale listings on its website, which also provides essential housing information for more than 100 million homes nationwide. This information includes property characteristics, tax assessor records, bankruptcy status and sales history, along with 20 categories of key housing-related facts provided by RealtyTrac's wholly-owned subsidiary, Homefacts®. RealtyTrac's foreclosure reports and other housing data are relied on by the Federal Reserve, U.S. Treasury Department, HUD, numerous state housing and banking departments, investment funds as well as millions of real estate professionals and consumers, to help evaluate housing trends and make informed decisions about real estate.
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