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Homebuyers on a $2,500 Monthly Budget Can Afford $33,000 More with Low Mortgage Rates, But Higher Home Prices Cancel Out Increase
Historically low rates are motivating homebuyers even though prices were up 8.2% year over year in July, effectively cancelling out the 6.9% increase in purchasing power SEATTLE, Sept. 3, 2020 -- A homebuyer with a $2,500 monthly housing budget can afford a home priced $33,250 higher than a year ago, thanks to historically low mortgage rates, according to a new report from Redfin, the technology-powered real estate brokerage. At a 3% mortgage interest rate—roughly the average 30-year fixed rate for July and August 2020—a homebuyer can afford a $516,500 home on $2,500 per month, up from the $483,250 they could afford on the same budget when the average was 3.77% in July 2019. The $33,250 rise in purchasing power from last year (from $483,250 to $516,500) is a 6.9% increase. The 8.2% year-over-year home-price increase in July, the largest rise in more than two years, was higher. Historically low mortgage rates are responsible for both: They push up homebuyer demand, which leads to an uptick in home prices. Those are the intended results, as the Fed is using low interest rates to stimulate the economy during the pandemic-driven recession. "Low mortgage rates are motivating many people to purchase a home, particularly those who want more space to work from home," said Redfin chief economist Daryl Fairweather. "But because there hasn't been an increase in the number of homes for sale since rates started dropping with the onset of the pandemic, many buyers end up competing for the same homes, driving up prices. Those competing forces make the current market a wash for many buyers looking for single-family homes in competitive areas. Buyers searching for condos can find a better deal, both on overall price and mortgage payments, because most condos are less competitive than single-family homes as people move out of densely populated urban areas." The continuing housing supply shortage means there are fewer affordable homes for sale for someone with a $2,500 monthly budget than last year. In July 2020, 70.6% of homes nationwide were affordable on that budget, down slightly from 71.9% in July 2019. Despite bigger budgets, buyers have fewer options in many metros There were fewer homes for sale on a $2,500 monthly budget than last year in the majority of metros Redfin analyzed. Salt Lake City (-5.2 percentage points), Kansas City (-3.7), Austin (-3.2) and Boston (-3) saw the biggest declines in the share of affordable homes for sale. Miami (+2.1), Jacksonville (+2), Columbus (+2) and Milwaukee (+2) experienced the biggest increases. In Providence, Rhode Island, where the share of affordable homes has declined 1.5 percentage points since last year, Redfin agent Lisa Bernardeau says low rates are the primary motivation for buyers right now. "Back in June, homebuyers thought they could take advantage of low rates and get a good deal because of the pandemic. Now they're seeing that's not the case because inventory is so tight and there's so much competition, but most buyers are still powering through. Regardless of high prices, a lot of buyers have been watching the market and they don't want to miss out on historically low rates or risk prices going even higher. Low interest rates are the number one driver right now." To view the full report, including charts and methodology, please click here. About Redfin Redfin is a technology-powered residential real estate company, redefining real estate in the consumer's favor in a commission-driven industry. We do this by integrating every step of the home buying and selling process and pairing our own agents with our own technology, creating a service that is faster, better and costs less. We offer brokerage, iBuying, mortgage, and title services, and we also run the country's #1 real estate brokerage search site, offering a host of online tools to consumers, including the Redfin Estimate. We represent people buying and selling homes in over 90 markets in the United States and Canada. Since our launch in 2006, we have saved our customers over $800 million and we've helped them buy or sell more than 235,000 homes worth more than $115 billion.
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West Coast, Best Coast, No More?
Millennials trade glitz and glam of downtown for affordability and more space to raise a family; West Coast is absent from annual Hottest ZIPs ranking SANTA CLARA, Calif., Aug. 18, 2020 -- East Coast markets flexed their dominance while West Coast markets failed to make the cut in realtor.com's 2020 Hottest ZIP Codes released today. In its sixth annual report, millennials continue to migrate away from the nation's urban centers in search of affordable housing and space to raise a family. The 2020 hottest ZIP codes in America, in rank order, are: 80911 Colorado Springs, Colo.; 43068 Reynoldsburg, Ohio; 14617 Rochester, N.Y.; 02176 Melrose, Mass.; 04106 South Portland, Maine; 66614 Topeka, Kan.; 03051 Hudson, N.H.; 01602 Worcester, Mass.; 22152 Springfield, Va.; and 27604 Raleigh, N.C. Among this year's top 10 hottest markets in America, a few consistent factors are driving their popularity, including: easy access to both downtown amenities and outdoor space, relative affordability with a strong local economy, and a large number of millennial homebuyers. Homes in this year's hottest ZIPs sell in an average of 18 days, 51 days faster than the rest of the country and 27 days faster than their respective metros, on average. Realtor.com® users view homes in these markets 4.3 times more often than homes in the rest of the country and 2.2 times more often than in their respective metro areas, on average. These housing markets are also 29% less dense (households per sq. mile) than the nation's top 50 largest metros. "This year's hottest ZIP codes lean noticeably toward the East Coast. Nothing west of the Rocky Mountains made the list," according to realtor.com® Chief Economist Danielle Hale. "But when you view the list through the lens of affordability, the picture becomes more clear. As the largest generation in U.S. history continues to advance toward life milestones -- settling down, marriage, parenthood -- the need for space and affordable housing outshines the bright lights in expensive urban areas like New York or Los Angeles. While we've seen millennials moving in this direction for a few years now, all the extra time at home spent trying to work, learn, and play in response to the pandemic has heightened these preferences, and put the trend toward extra space and affordability on fast-forward." East Coast dominates hottest ZIPs Half of this year's hottest ZIPs reside in the Northeast, including Rochester, Melrose, South Portland, Hudson, and Worcester. Demand for these markets was driven by a lack of affordability in nearby larger urban cores such as New York and Boston where prices have sky-rocketed and increased space is a luxury many can't afford. Further south, but still along the East Coast, are Springfield and Raleigh. Although many of these markets were hit by the COVID-19 pandemic first, they were also some of the first to recover, which allowed buyers to come out in force to make up for lost time during the typical spring home buying season. Pent up demand has helped catapult these markets to the top of the list where homes are flying off the market 3.4 times faster than the average home. Millennials attracted by affordability As millennials continue to seek more bang for their buck, demand is sparking up in smaller, less dense markets where housing is more affordable and being a millennial homeowner is more than just a pipe dream. In fact, the average millennial homeownership rate in this year's hottest ZIPs is 53%, compared to 43% for the rest of the country. In part, this is because millennials are thriving in these areas. The average household income for millennials in the hottest ZIPs is $82,011, 27% greater than the national median of $64,670. Millennials in these markets aren't only doing well compared to millennials in other areas, they are doing well compared to other generations as well, including Baby Boomers. In each of the 10 hottest ZIPs, millennials make up the greatest share of mortgage originations. The average share of originations for millennials is 38% in the hottest ZIPs, compared to 27% for 35 to 44 year olds. 2020 Hottest ZIP Codes in America 1) 80911, Colorado Springs, Colo. -- ZIP 80911 is located on the southern edge of Colorado Springs and about 1.5 hours from Denver. The area is known for its great weather with over 300 days of sunshine a year, easy access to the outdoors such as Garden of the Gods Park, and vibrant downtown including a robust art scene. The area is also home to the brand new United States Olympic & Paralympic Museum, which just opened in July. This area offers residents a great quality of life including affordable homes, especially compared to nearby Denver, and strong schools such as Martin Luther King Jr Elementary School (GreatSchools rating 8/10). Last year, ZIP 80916, also located in Colorado Springs, was ranked No. 10 overall. Housing Stats: Homes in ZIP 80911 spend an average of 13 days on market, 20 days less than the Colorado Springs metro on a whole and 58 days less than the national median. The median listing price is $287,000, up 6.5% year-over-year, but 39% lower than the metro and 13% lower than the national median. Seventy-seven percent of residents in ZIP 80911 are homeowners and millennial homeownership is 62%. 2) 43068, Reynoldsburg, Ohio -- ZIP 43068 is located less than a 30-minute drive to the east of Columbus, Ohio. The area attracts young and growing families with its quiet suburban feel while still having easy access to downtown Columbus and all it has to offer. The area boasts a strong school system including Reynoldsburg High School, which is rated a 9/10 by GreatSchools. Additionally, with its close proximity to The Ohio State University, the area keeps a youthful vibe with lots to do, all within a short drive. For those not wanting to head into Columbus, Reynoldsburg offers residents plenty of dining and shopping choices in its revitalized downtown. Seventy percent of residents live within one mile of downtown Main Street. Housing Stats: Homes in ZIP 43068 spend an average of 17 days on market, 28 days less than the Columbus metro and 52 days less than U.S. The median priced home is $204,000, 37% less than the metro and 38% less than the national median. Fifty-six percent of residents in this ZIP are homeowners and millennial homeownership is 38%. 3) 14617 Rochester, N.Y. -- ZIP 14617 is located along the Genesee River and southern shore of Lake Ontario. The area's massive revitalization, especially along the riverfront, has boosted its popularity with young millennials who want to take advantage of downtown's amenities including boutique shopping and great restaurants. Rochester is New York's third largest metro area and includes a blend of history and innovation. The area is also drawing young families with its strong school system including Iroquois Middle School (GreatSchools rating 8/10). Rochester is no stranger to realtor.com®'s Hottest ZIPs list, last year ZIP 1460 ranked No. 5. Housing stats: Homes in ZIP 14617 sell in an average of 18 days, 26 days faster than the Rochester metro as a whole and 51 days faster than the national median. The median listing price is $162,000, up 16.6% year-over-year, but 35% lower than the metro and 51% lower than the national median. Eighty percent of residents in this ZIP are homeowners and millennial homeownership is 82%. 4) 02176 Melrose, Mass. -- ZIP 02176 is located just 10 miles north of Boston. The area boasts a historic downtown, desirable school system which includes Horace Mann Elementary School (GreatSchools rating 9/10) and easy access to public transportation. The town attracts many young families who are looking for more space but still want to enjoy a quick commute to Boston. Locals enjoy boating and stand-up paddle boarding on nearby Spot Pond, the downtown with its boutique shops and restaurants and easy access to green space including the Fells Reservation with great hiking trails. Melrose is a veteran on the Hottest ZIPs list, it ranked No. 7 in 2019. Housing stats: Homes in Melrose sell in an average of 19 days, 26 days faster than the metro and 50 days faster than the national median. The median listing price is $644,000, 2% higher than the metro and 95% higher than the national median. Sixty-three percent of residents in this ZIP are homeowners and millennial homeownership is 46%. 5) 04106 South Portland, Maine -- ZIP 04106 is located on scenic Casco Bay and is part of South Portland. It offers a slightly more affordable option compared to the city of Portland, while still being close to downtown and its world-class restaurants. South Portland is a short drive from Portland Head, Maine's oldest and the country's most-photographed lighthouse. They don't call it "vacationland" for nothing -- South Portland also boasts beautiful beaches, miles of rocky coastline, friendly atmosphere and the ability to walk almost anywhere. The community attracts a lot of families and people looking to escape bigger cities like Boston and New York. Housing stats: Homes in ZIP 04106 spend an average of 21 days on the market, seven days more than last year, but 38 days less than the Portland metro overall. The median list price is $377,000 up 4.2% year-over-year. Asking prices are 9% lower than the metro overall, but 14% higher than the U.S. median. Fifty seven percent of residents in this ZIP are homeowners and millennial homeownership rate is 36%. 6) 66614 Topeka, Kan. -- ZIP 66614 is located on the western side of Topeka, the state capital of Kansas. The area is known for the landmark U.S. Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education that declared segregation in public schools to be unconstitutional. While government, healthcare and education are some of the ZIP's largest employers, Topeka is home to a number of manufacturing and distribution centers, including Target, Frito-Lay Inc, Mars Chocolate and Goodyear Tire. In particular, ZIP 66614 is attracting both move up and first-time home buyers with its affordability and close proximity to the area's new shopping and entertainment as well as easy access to Kansas City that is within an hour's drive. Housing stats: Homes in ZIP 66614 sell in 19 days on average, 19 days faster than the metro and 50 days faster than the national median. The median listing price is $184,000, 14% more than the metro, but 44% lower than the national median. Sixty-two percent of residents in the ZIP are homeowners and millennial homeownership is 45%. 7) 03051 Hudson, N.H. -- ZIP 03051 is located in Hudson, N.H., less than an hour north of Boston. Many families looking to escape the busy Boston area head just over the border to the quiet area. Known as "tax-free" New Hampshire, locals enjoy a lower cost of living with no state income or sales tax. Nestled along the Merrimack River, Hudson offers lots of space with easy access to major freeways that lead to the lakes region, skiing or the seacoast. Visitors and locals with a taste for adrenaline enjoy checking out the local indoor skydiving and surfing facility, as well as outdoor activities like hiking, biking and snowmobiling. Housing stats: Homes in ZIP 03051 sell in 22 days on average, 22 days faster than the metro and 46 days faster than the national median. The median listing price is $350,000, 12% lower than metro as a whole. Seventy-eight percent of residents in this ZIP are homeowners and millennial homeownership is 33%. 8) 01602 Worcester, Mass. -- ZIP code 01602 is located on the western side of Worcester, just an hour outside of Boston. It's known for its historic homes, culturally diverse population and highly rated schools, such as Midland Street and West Tatnuck, both rated 8/10 by GreatSchools. Worcester State University is located in the heart of the ZIP and is one of the largest employers in the area, along with Becker College and Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Worcester is a hot spot for families and retirees looking for three or four bedroom homes, but increasing home prices have pushed it out of reach for many first time home buyers. Housing stats: Homes in Worcester spend an average 21 days on market, 31 days less than the metro as a whole and 48 days less than the national median. The median listing price is $318,000, 14% lower than metro as a whole and 4% lower than the national median. Sixty-three percent of residents in this ZIP are homeowners and millennial homeownership is 50%. 9) 22152 Springfield, Va. -- ZIP 22152 is located just inland of the Potomac River, while offering easy access for those working in and around Fort Belvoir, Pentagon City, Arlington, Alexandria, Va., D.C., and National Landing, the home of the new Amazon headquarters. This ZIP offers a mix of townhomes and single-family homes that provide options for both first-time and move-up buyers as well as considerable green space with Pohick Creek Stream Valley Park to the east and Lake Accotink Park to the north. The highly rated West Springfield High School (GreatSchools rating of 8/10), recently redeveloped Springfield Town Center and close proximity to Burke Town Center and Kingstowne are big draws for buyers to the area. Housing stats: Homes in ZIP 22152 sell in an average of seven days, 32 days faster than the metro area and 62 days faster than the national median. The median listing price is $553,000, 8% higher than the rest of the metro and 68% higher than the national median. Eighty percent of residents in this ZIP are homeowners and millennial homeownership is 66%. 10) 27604 Raleigh, N.C. -- ZIP 27604 is located on the north side of Raleigh and reaches all the way into downtown. The area boasts a high quality of living due to its affordability, and that helps draw many buyers from more expensive cities. Raleigh offers its residents all the amenities that come with a large city, but with a small town vibe and plenty of Southern hospitality. Buyers looking to move to the area will have to pledge their allegiance to one of the many incredible local basketball programs that include Duke University, North Carolina State University, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Housing stats: Homes in this ZIP sell in an average of 25 days, 32 days faster than the metro as a whole and 44 days faster than the national median. The median listing price is $273,000, 27% lower than the metro and 17% lower than the national median. Fifty-four percent of residents in this ZIP are homeowners and millennial homeownership is 42%. Methodology Realtor.com® analyzed 20,000 ZIP codes based on the time it takes properties to sell and how frequently homes are viewed in each ZIP code from April-June 20, 2020. Eligible ZIP codes had at least 13 active listings each month to calculate a Hotness ranking. Limited to one ZIP code per metropolitan area. About realtor.com® Realtor.com® makes buying, selling and living in homes easier and more rewarding for everyone. Realtor.com® pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today through its website and mobile apps is a trusted source for the information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. Using proprietary data science and machine learning technology, realtor.com® pairs buyers and sellers with local agents in their market, helping take the guesswork out of buying and selling a home. For professionals, realtor.com® is a trusted provider of consumer connections and branding solutions that help them succeed in today's on-demand world. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com.
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People Are Searching in the Suburbs More Than Ever Before
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COVID-19 Impacts Homebuyer Preferences But Not Budgets: Homes.com Survey
Over 40% Seek Different Features, 80% Have Same or Increased Price Range Norfolk, VA (July 29, 2020) -- The COVID-19 pandemic has changed many of the features desired by U.S. homebuyers and increased the dependence on virtual tours; however, it has had little impact on homebuying budgets, according to a Homes.com survey of over 1,000 consumers who have purchased a home during the coronavirus outbreak or plan to purchase before the end of the year. Fully 80% of survey respondents reported that their homebuying budgets had either remained the same or increased since the start of the pandemic, indicating that consumers remain committed to investing in homeownership despite possible anxiety over the challenging economic conditions caused by the pandemic. Overall, 35- to 44-year-olds were the most likely to report a decrease in their budgets, but the impact varied by geography. Most of the respondents who did lower their price targets in the Western states were Generation Z (18-24) buyers, while those in the Northeast were in the Millennial and Generation X age range (24-44). The survey also found that: Over 40% of respondents have changed the features they want in a home because of COVID-19, including adding a home office (30%), larger square footage (27%), enclosed backyard (27%) and/or closed floor plan (15%) to their wish list. These shifts may reflect the realities of today's work-from-home and e-learning needs. Over half of respondents planning to purchase a home before the end of the year have used virtual tours in their search, with roughly one-third having viewed 1-3 homes and one-fourth viewing 11+ homes through virtual tools. One-third of those who have purchased in the last four months utilized these live video tours or virtual open houses. More people indicated they were moving because they wanted a less populated area (16%) than moving for a job (14%), retirement (11%), or wanting a better school system for their children (8%). The most common reason for moving was the need to upsize for a growing family (25%). 37% of respondents have purchased in the last four months and 44% plan to purchase before the end of the year, demonstrating that homeownership remains a strong imperative even during the pandemic. 33% of those who have purchased or plan to purchase a home are aged 18-34, supporting earlier Homes.com surveys indicating that Gen Z is highly committed to early homeownership. Overall, the largest number of buyers or potential buyers (40%) are located in the South, with the rest split between the Midwest (25%), West (22%) and Northeast (13%). 51% are looking for existing single-family detached homes, followed by new construction single-family detached (20%), condominium (14%) and townhouse (11%). "The pandemic has changed what 'home' means for many families and how they search for them," said Homes.com president David Mele. "Even in the midst of those changes, our survey confirms that consumer commitment to homeownership remains the same." More information about the Homes.com 2020 Consumer Homebuyer survey can be found at https://go.homes/COVID19Buyers About Homes.com Homes.com offers today's demanding homebuyers, renters, and those somewhere in between a simply smarter home search with a more personalized and conversational way to find their next home. Since its launch over 25 years ago, Homes.com offers real estate professionals brand and property advertising, search engine marketing, and instant response lead generation to help them succeed online. For more information, visit Homes.com.
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Remote Work to Drive Home Purchase Decisions in the Next Six Months
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Realtor.com Weekly Recovery Report: Record Breaking Traffic Signals Summer Buying Season is Here
But buyers continue to face significant headwinds of record-low inventory SANTA CLARA, Calif., July 9, 2020 -- Summer home buying season is off to a roaring start. As buyers flooded into the market, realtor.com monthly traffic hit an all-time high of 86 million unique users in June 2020, breaking May's record of 85 million unique users. Realtor.com® daily traffic also hit its highest level ever of 7 million unique users on June 25, signaling that despite the global pandemic buyers are ready to make a purchase. The realtor.com® Housing Market Recovery Index reached 97.8 nationwide for the week ending July 4, posting the largest weekly increase since the index was introduced. The week's 2.1 point increase over the prior week brings the index just 2.2 points below the pre-COVID baseline. However, supply remains the biggest factor slowing the recovery; total listings remain 31 percent lower than last year and more listings will need to enter the market for sustained improvement in home sales. "The consistent, record-level homebuyer interest we've detected on realtor.com® over the last five weeks is setting up the tightest summer homebuying season on record," said Javier Vivas, director of economic research for realtor.com®. "All-time low mortgage rates and easing job losses have boosted buyer confidence back to pre-pandemic levels. With supply at record lows , the backlog of demand portends increased competition and a seller's market in the weeks ahead. While buyers are back, growth in home sales this summer will be constrained by the slow return of sellers and the limited amount of homes hitting the market. Key Findings: Local Recovery: Regionally, the West (index 104.4) continues to lead the recovery with the overall index now visibly above the pre-COVID benchmark. The Northeast (index 102.1) also surpassed the recovery baseline last week, and continues to improve. The South (index 96.4) and Midwest (index 95.4) are still lagging but are now back on a steady recovery path. Locally, an additional two markets have crossed the recovery benchmark this week, taking the total number of markets above the January baseline to 14, the highest since the early pandemic period. The overall recovery index is showing greatest recovery in Boston, San Francisco, Denver, Philadelphia, and Los Angeles, with growth in demand and the pace of sales surpassing pre-COVID benchmarks. Total inventory was down 31 percent. The number of homes for sale dropped over last week again even though new listings are improving. More home buyers are taking advantage of low mortgage rates and putting a dent in inventory. New listings are down 4 percent. Fourth of July celebrations falling on a weekend as opposed to midweek boosted the natural pace of new listings. However, we expect the improvement to return to last week's level next week. More sellers will need to enter the market to see sustained improvement during this summer. Median listing prices continue growing at 6.2 percent over last year, faster than the pre-COVID pace. Time on market is now just three days slower than last year as the still-limited number of homes for sale forces buyers to make faster decisions than in the early pandemic period. The market is picking up speed given the surge in buyers but still limited in home sellers. Realtor.com® Recovery Index by Metro Weekly listings data Weekly Recovery index data Methodology: The Weekly Housing Index leverages a weighted average of realtor.com® search traffic, median list prices, new listings, and median time on market and compares it to the January 2020 market trend, as a baseline for pre-COVID market growth. The overall index is set to 100 in this baseline period. The higher a market's index value, the higher its recovery and vice versa. About realtor.com® Realtor.com® makes buying, selling and living in homes easier and more rewarding for everyone. Realtor.com® pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today through its website and mobile apps is a trusted source for the information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. Using proprietary data science and machine learning technology, realtor.com® pairs buyers and sellers with local agents in their market, helping take the guesswork out of buying and selling a home. For professionals, realtor.com® is a trusted provider of consumer connections and branding solutions that help them succeed in today's on-demand world. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com.
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Key Housing Indicators Begin to Turn Around in May
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Homes.com Traffic Trends Point to Emerging Recovery
A mere five months after the world was introduced to COVID-19, the impact has already left a permanent mark on each of us. Historical viewpoints describing this unusual period will be formed based on the stories currently being recorded and archived for future generations. While the historical impact will be measured over years, the economic impact is being felt in real time. Unprecedented business shutdowns and historic job losses have interrupted economic activity across nearly every industry. Some will recover more quickly than others. Fortunately we are already seeing signs of housing demand being unleashed and an early recovery emerging. The three traffic metrics we monitor most closely at Homes.com are site visits, engagement, and requests for information. The first variable, site visits, is the equivalent of customers walking through our door, while engagement measures their activity on the site, including page views. Strong metrics in these first two categories typically result in increased requests for information, driving business to our broker and agent advertising partners. During the peak of stay-at-home orders, weekly visits to Homes.com declined by as much as 35%, measured against the weeks leading up to the outbreak. This is a significant decline, especially during the time of year when housing demand typically picks up for the spring and summer. Thankfully, the bounce back seems to have occurred as quickly as the decline. Accurately measuring pent up demand is an inexact science, but it appears to be accelerating an emerging recovery. The following analysis shows the decline and recovery of Homes.com traffic measured against the "Pre-Pandemic Phase" from February 3rd through March 8th, the 5-week period leading up to widespread stay-at-home orders. Interestingly, while the number of customers walking through our doors at Homes.com declined by nearly a quarter during the Outbreak Phase, site engagement remained fairly high, dropping by only 4%, as requests for information, a measure of intent to buy in the near term, fell by 13%. This early trend of steady site engagement proved to be a strong indicator of pent up demand. As traffic returned during the Recovery Phase, and is now flat with the Pre-Pandemic level, engagement has soared by 15%, and intent to buy in the near term is back to slightly above Pre-Pandemic levels. Also encouraging, first time mortgage applications are up 9% year over year, after being down 35% just six weeks ago. During conventional economic cycles, pent up demand builds during a recession alongside high savings rates. Once confidence returns and a recovery starts, pent up demand is released and consumers spend more. While this is certainly not a conventional cycle, these Homes.com metrics are a strong indication that pent up demand is driving a recovery of housing activity: a positive sign we are heading towards a promising summer season for the real estate industry. To view the original post, visit the Homes.com blog.
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Unprecedented Turnaround in Home Showing Activity Seen in April and May as Agents, Buyers and Sellers Adjust to Virtual Showings
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Hopeful Home Shoppers Rev Their Engines at the Starting Line
Realtor.com users saving and sharing more listings; relying on virtual tours to prepare SANTA CLARA, Calif., May 18, 2020 -- Increased activity on realtor.com suggests that home shoppers are gearing up for a later than usual homebuying season. Realtor.com® listing visits, saves and shares are all up significantly since the first wave of shelter-in-place orders took effect on March 16; especially for those listings with virtual tours. Consumer survey data shows virtual tours have become an essential part of the home search process and will likely remain so even after in-person open houses resume across the country. Listing visits, saves and shares up significantly More than 70 percent of realtor.com® users surveyed registered on the site so that they could save homes as a way to track price reductions and make a shortlist of homes to tour post COVID-19. Additionally, since March 16: Listing views for single family homes and condos are up 30 percent; Saved homes are up 76 percent; Shared homes are up 95 percent; and Time spent per unique user is up 14 percent. "Data suggests that home shoppers who had paused their search are now picking it back up, and the spring homebuying season won't be lost, but merely pushed into the summer months," said Danielle Hale, Chief Economist, realtor.com®. "Tools such as virtual tours and Livestream Open Houses are enabling consumers to safely continue their home search while maintaining social distancing guidelines and have proven to be very popular with consumers." Virtual shopping technology is here to stay Since shelter-in-place orders began, the growth rate of visits to listings with virtual tours has been twice as high as those without. User visits were also 29 percent higher for listings featuring virtual tours, with those listings generating increased engagement and greater likelihood of a consumer connecting with an agent about the home. "While many consumers don't see virtual tours as a replacement for in-person viewings, they have emerged as a valuable tool to learn more about a home, see details up close and help narrow down the search. We believe virtual tours will remain an integral part of the home search, even when shoppers feel more comfortable visiting homes in-person again," said Hale. A survey of realtor.com® users found that: Two thirds (64 percent) had taken a virtual tour, and of those, 45 percent prefer listings that offer virtual tours; Sixty five percent of home buyers believe that virtual tours will continue to be a great resource in their home shopping process even after the pandemic; and An additional 8 percent think virtual tours can be a replacement for in-person tours. When asked what they like about virtual tours, top responses include: They help me eliminate homes that aren't for me (52 percent); They help me see the details of a home without having to step inside (43 percent); They help me create a shortlist of homes I want to see in person (38 percent); and They allow me to see more homes more quickly, without having to drive around to open houses (30 percent). Visit realtor.com®'s COVID-19 recovery site for information, resources and tools: https://www.realtor.com/covid-19/recovery About realtor.com® Realtor.com® makes buying, selling and living in homes easier and more rewarding for everyone. Realtor.com® pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today through its website and mobile apps is a trusted source for the information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. Using proprietary data science and machine learning technology, realtor.com® pairs buyers and sellers with local agents in their market, helping take the guesswork out of buying and selling a home. For professionals, realtor.com® is a trusted provider of consumer connections and branding solutions that help them succeed in today's on-demand world. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com.
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Realtor.com Forecasts a Year of Ups and Downs for Housing Market
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New Listings Fall Nearly 45 Percent in April as Coronavirus Keeps Sellers on the Sidelines
April data shows asking prices flatten as homes linger on the market longer SANTA CLARA, Calif., May 5, 2020 -- Newly listed homes dropped 44.1 percent in April -- historically one of the busiest months for residential real estate -- an indication sellers decided to wait and see how market conditions play out over the coming months, according to realtor.com's April Monthly Housing Trends Report, released today. The report offers the first full month of data showing the impact the COVID-19 pandemic is having on residential real estate throughout the U.S. The significant decrease in new listings adds a new dimension to the nation's inventory-starved housing market. The Northeast -- the region hit hardest by the COVID-19 pandemic -- saw the greatest decline in new listings at 59.4 percent. It was followed by declines of 49.5 percent in the Midwest, 44.1 percent in the West, and 31.4 percent in the South. "The good momentum we saw at the start of the year has helped to somewhat insulate the housing market from the coronavirus' negative impact on buyer and seller confidence across the U.S. Although we saw sharp drops in new listings, an increase in the time it takes to sell a home and a flattening of prices in April, May is likely to see some of these metrics worsen," said realtor.com® Chief Economist Danielle Hale. She added, "Just how significantly the housing market is impacted by the pandemic will depend on how effective the country is at containing the virus and how the economy responds. If all goes well, we could see buyers returning to the market aggressively this summer to make up for the spring they lost." The combination of a decline in new listings and many sellers opting to delist their properties pushed the total number of homes for sale across the U.S. down 15.3 percent year-over-year. April's drop in inventory amounted to a loss of 189,000 listings compared to this time last year. Within the nation's 50 largest metros, inventory declined by 16 percent overall, and none of the 50 metros saw an increase in inventory over last year. The metros with the biggest declines in inventory were Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, Wis. (-46.1 percent); Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, Pa.-N.J.-Del.-Md. (-38.7 percent); and Providence-Warwick, R.I.-Mass. (-29.3 percent). Days on market increased in April Homes sold in 62 days on average nationally in April, four days slower than April 2019. This is likely an indication that buyers also have decided to step back to see if economic conditions will improve over the coming months. Weekly data suggests May could see homes sitting even longer. During the week ending on April 25, homes spent an average of nine days more on the market than the same week last year. Additionally, social distancing measures and stricter mortgage lending criteria have made viewing a home and qualifying for a mortgage more difficult, which could continue to extend the amount of time a property sits on the market. Metros with the greatest increase in days on market were led by Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, N.Y. (+24 days); Detroit-Warren-Dearborn, Mich. (+22 days); and Pittsburgh, Pa, (+15 days). Typical home asking prices flatten Nationally, the median listing price grew 0.6 percent year-over-year to $320,000. However, this was notably slower than March's price growth rate of 3.8 percent. This trend is driven by diminished seller expectations and by a shift in the mix of homes for sale. All of the nation's most expensive large metros have seen newly listed homes drop by 40 percent or more. Some lower-priced large metros have seen large declines in newly listed homes, but others have seen much more moderate reductions. Of the nation's 50 largest metros, 47 saw prices decelerate compared to March. The steepest price declines were seen in Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas (-5.7 percent); Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, Wash. (-4.5 percent); and Chicago-Naperville-Elgin, Ill.-Ind.-Wis. (-4.4 percent). *Some data points for Los Angeles have been excluded due to data unavailability. EDITOR'S NOTE: The realtor.com economics team is continually tracking the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the U.S. economy and housing market. The team's reports and analysis are available here. About realtor.com® Realtor.com® makes buying, selling and living in homes easier and more rewarding for everyone. Realtor.com® pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today through its website and mobile apps is a trusted source for the information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. Using proprietary data science and machine learning technology, realtor.com® pairs buyers and sellers with local agents in their market, helping take the guesswork out of buying and selling a home. For professionals, realtor.com® is a trusted provider of consumer connections and branding solutions that help them succeed in today's on-demand world. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com.
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Nearly 3 in 4 Realtors This Week Report Sellers Haven't Lowered Listing Prices to Attract Buyers, Suggesting Calmness and No Panic Selling by Homeowners
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U.S. Housing Markets Vulnerable to Coronavirus Impact Clustered in Northeast and Florida
Nearly Half of the 50 Most Vulnerable Counties in New Jersey and Florida; Midwest and West Regions Less At Risk of Housing-Market Challenges IRVINE, Calif. -- April 7, 2020 -- ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database and first property data provider of Data-as-a-Service (DaaS), today released a Special Report spotlighting county-level housing markets around the United States that are more or less vulnerable to the impact of the Coronavirus pandemic. The report shows that the Northeast has the largest concentration of the most at-risk counties, with clusters in New Jersey and Florida, while the West and Midwest have the smallest. The report reveals that housing markets in 14 of New Jersey's 21 counties are among the 50 most vulnerable in the country to the economic impact of the Coronavirus. The top 50 also include four in New York, three in Connecticut and 10 from Florida, but only one in California, none in other West Coast states and only one in the Southwest. Markets are considered more or less at risk based on the percentage of housing units receiving a foreclosure notice in Q4 2019, the percent of homes underwater (LTV 100 or greater) in Q4 2019, and the percentage of local wages required to pay for major home ownership expenses. Rankings are based on a combination of those three categories in 483 counties around the United States with sufficient data to analyze. Counties were ranked in each category, from lowest to highest, with the overall conclusions based on a combination of the three rankings. See below for the full methodology. "It's too early to tell how much effect the Coronavirus fallout will have on different housing markets around the country. But the impact is likely to be significant from region to region and county to county," said Todd Teta, chief product officer with ATTOM Data Solutions. "What we've done is spotlight areas that appear to be more or less at risk based on several important factors. From that analysis, it looks like the Northeast is more at risk than other areas. As we head into the Spring home buying season, the next few months will reveal how severe the impact will be." High-level findings from the analysis: New Jersey and Florida have 24 of the 50 most vulnerable counties from among the 483 included in the report. The 14 counties in New Jersey include five in the New York City suburban area: Bergen, Essex, Passaic, Middlesex and Union counties. The 10 counties in Florida are concentrated in the northern and central sections of the state, including Flagler, Lake, Clay, Hernando and Osceola counties. New York counties among the top 50 most at risk include Rockland County, in the New York City metropolitan area; Orange County, in the Poughkeepsie metro area; Rensselaer County, in the Albany metro area; and Ulster County, west of Poughkeepsie. Other southern counties that are in the top 50 are spread across Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Louisiana and Virginia. Among the counties analyzed, only two in the West and five in the Midwest (all in Illinois) rank among the top 50 most at risk from problems connected to the Coronavirus outbreak. The two western counties are Shasta County, CA, in the Redding metropolitan statistical area and Navajo County, AZ, northeast of Phoenix. The midwestern counties are McHenry County, IL; Kane County, IL; Will County, IL and Lake County, IL, all in the Chicago metro area; and Tazewell County, IL, in the Peoria metro area. Counties in the top 50 with a population of at least 500,000 people include Bergen, Camden, Essex, Middlesex, Ocean, Passaic and Union counties in New Jersey; Lake, Will and Kane counties in Illinois; Delaware County, PA; Prince George's County, MD; and Broward County, FL. Texas has 10 of the 50 least vulnerable counties from among the 483 included in the report, followed by Wisconsin with seven and Colorado with five. The 10 counties in Texas include three in the Dallas-Fort Worth metro area (Dallas, Collin and Tarrant counties) and two in the Midland-Odessa area (Ector and Midland counties). Eighteen of the 50 least at-risk counties have a population of at least 500,000, led by Harris County (Houston), TX; Dallas County, TX; King County (Seattle), WA; Tarrant County (Fort Worth), TX; and Santa Clara County, CA, in the San Jose metro area. Counties where median prices ranging from $160,000 to $300,000 comprise 36 of the top 50 counties most vulnerable to the impact of the Coronavirus. Counties with median home prices below $160,000 or above $300,000 make up 14 of the top 50 most vulnerable to the impact of the Coronavirus. Those with median prices below $160,000 are among the most affordable in the nation to local wage earners, while those where median prices exceed $300,000 have some homes with the highest equity and smallest foreclosure rates. Report methodology The ATTOM Data Solutions Special Coronavirus Market Impact Report is based on ATTOM's fourth-quarter 2019 residential foreclosure and underwater (LTV 100 or more) property reports and first-quarter 2020 home affordability report. Counties with sufficient data to analyze were ranked based on the percentage of properties with a foreclosure filing during the fourth quarter of 2019, the percentage of properties with outstanding mortgage balances that exceeded estimated market values in the fourth quarter of 2019, and the percentage of average local wages need to afford the major expenses of owning a median-priced home in the first quarter of 2020. Ranks then were added up to develop an overall ranking across all three categories. Equal weight was given to each category. Counties with the lowest composite ranks were considered most vulnerable to housing market problems. Those with the highest composite ranks were considered least vulnerable. About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, property data APIs, real estate market trends, marketing lists, match & append and introducing the first property data delivery solution, a cloud-based data platform that streamlines data management – Data-as-a-Service (DaaS).
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March Housing Trends Provide First Glimpse of COVID-19 Impact on U.S. Housing Market
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Redfin Reports How U.S. Cities Will Fare in the Coronavirus Recession
Affordable homes and low exposure to volatile industries should help some metros weather the storm SEATTLE, March 31, 2020 -- Affordable East Coast and Midwest cities have the lowest overall economic risk in the 2020 recession that began in March, according to a new report from Redfin, the technology-powered real estate brokerage. The one-two punch of the coronavirus (COVID-19) and an oil price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia has rapidly brought to reality a possibility that seemed remote just a few months ago, but the impact in the real estate market is likely to be short-lived and much less extreme than the 2008 Great Recession. Rochester, Hartford, and Raleigh have the lowest overall economic risk in this recession, while Los Angeles, Miami, and San Diego have the highest risk, based on a late March 2020 analysis by Redfin economists. Housing is Well Positioned to Weather This Storm Because the housing market was strong going into the 2020 recession, there's currently no reason to expect a major crash in home prices. In fact, the driving factors for this 2020 recession are unrelated to real estate, which is just one of the reasons at this time Redfin believes fallout in the U.S. real estate market will be mild, and nowhere near the catastrophe of the 2008 Great Recession. "The housing market came into this turmoil in a strong position, with a very low supply of homes for sale and record levels of home equity," said Redfin lead economist Taylor Marr. "Home equity can function as a rainy day fund. Homeowners can weather a storm of falling home values without the pressure to walk away from their home. They can also better handle a loss of income if they can tap into their equity with a home equity line of credit (HELOC). This stabilizes the market, preventing an influx of supply from foreclosures, which would further cause prices to fall in a vicious cycle. Additional government support provided through the stimulus bill CARES Act and a moratorium on foreclosures can also prevent a falling out during this pandemic." To evaluate the potential impact of the 2020 recession on the local economies of the 49 largest U.S. cities, Redfin analyzed a variety of general factors, as well as some specific to this recession, such as rates of leisure and hospitality employment, debt-to-income ratios, number coronavirus cases and air transportation employment. Metros With Lowest Economic Risk in the Coronavirus 2020 Recession High Debt, High Density and Expensive Housing Make Some Cities More Susceptible While many cities are expected to weather the 2020 recession, some will be harder hit than others. Because the impacts on other, non-housing sectors of the economy, especially employment, are likely to be very large, some metro areas face a greater economic risk during the 2020 recession. Those that are hit the hardest overall are also likely to be more at risk of a real estate downturn. "Some cities have factors that make them more susceptible to losing their footing and are likely to be hard hit," continued Marr. "Amidst rapidly rising layoffs, it will be especially difficult to sell a home in these markets, and yet buyers will likely find limited options as sellers delay listing, leaving the housing market in a standstill. Federal support will help cushion the fall, but in these areas it will take significantly longer to recover." The cities most likely to face economic risk tend to be those with high home prices, high levels of personal debt, and large numbers of people employed in the hospitality industry, which applies to most of the big cities in the West. San Jose (48.4%) is the only metro area in the West with a recession risk score below 50%. The metro area with the highest risk of economic damage during this coronavirus recession is Los Angeles, with an overall score of 77.6%, followed by Miami (76.8%) and San Diego (75.2%). Chicago and Denver stand out as unusual among the 10 metros at greatest risk as, unlike most others on the list, neither is a typical "boom-bust" town. Both have relatively high population density, large employment bases in air transportation and a large rate of existing coronavirus cases, which drove up their overall risk scores. To read the full report, complete with metro rankings and methodology, please click here About Redfin Redfin is a technology-powered real estate brokerage, combining its own full-service agents with modern technology to redefine real estate in the consumer's favor. Founded by software engineers, Redfin has the country's #1 brokerage website and offers a host of online tools to consumers, including the Redfin Estimate, the automated home-value estimate with the industry's lowest published error rate for listed homes. Homebuyers and sellers enjoy a full-service, technology-powered experience from Redfin real estate agents, while saving thousands in commissions. Redfin serves more than 90 major metro areas across the U.S. and Canada. The company has helped customers buy or sell homes worth more than $115 billion.
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NAR Survey Finds Nearly Half of Realtors Say Home Buyer Interest Has Decreased Due to the Coronavirus Outbreak
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Exclusive Podcast Interview with NAR Chief Economist on Coronavirus Impact
National Association of REALTORS ® Chief Economist, Dr. Lawrence Yun, addresses the outlook of real estate markets in a special episode of "The Brian Buffini Show" podcast CARLSBAD, Calif., March 19, 2020 -- Chief economist and senior vice president of research for the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR), Dr. Lawrence Yun, will discuss the impact of COVID-19 on real estate and the economy in an exclusive interview with real estate leader, Brian Buffini, on The Brian Buffini Show podcast. Available Thursday, March 19, the two experts will weigh in on the state of the housing market, the short/long-term outlook and how real estate agents can safely serve their clients and community. In a wide-ranging interview covering a variety of topics, Dr. Yun reveals his belief that a vibrant real estate market should emerge after the coronavirus threat subsides, "even if it takes a little longer to contain it, there are such solid fundamentals for the real estate market, things will play out very well over the long haul." Buffini advises real estate professionals to be a reliable source of market information for their clients and use the downtime to enhance their professional skills. He wants everyone to realize that "The sky is not falling. This is a difficult time, but in many ways, it could be our finest hour." Dr. Lawrence Yun is a renowned leader in real estate and economics. His extensive research fuels major reports for NAR, which serves a membership of more than 1.4 million real estate agents. During this interview, respected industry guru Brian Buffini complements Yun with his more than 30 years of real estate expertise, providing much needed clarity in the midst of an uncertain economic situation. The Brian Buffini Show podcast is now in its 4th year of providing real estate professionals and consumers with Brian's insightful observations, along with the views his well-known guests. The podcast has become recognized as one of the most influential in the industry, with over 7 million downloads. What: "This Too Shall Pass: An Interview with Dr. Lawrence Yun," The Brian Buffini Show special episode Who: Lawrence Yun, Chief Economist for the National Association of REALTORS®, and Brian Buffini, Founder and Chairman of Buffini & Company Where: https://www.thebrianbuffinishow.com/ When: Available Thursday, March 19, 2020 @ 12:01 a.m. About Buffini & Company Buffini & Company is the largest coaching and training company in North America. Founded by real estate legend and master motivator Brian Buffini, the company provides a unique and highly-effective lead generation system. Buffini & Company's comprehensive business coaching, training programs and cutting-edge content have helped more than 3 million professionals in 37 countries improve their business, increase net profit and enhance their quality of life. Buffini & Company is headquartered in Carlsbad, California. For more information, please email [email protected] About Brian Buffini Brian Buffini, chairman and founder for Buffini & Company, was born and raised in Dublin, Ireland, emigrated to San Diego, California, in 1986 where he became the classic American rags-to-riches story. Discovering real estate, Brian quickly became one of the nation's top real estate agents working a non-traditional methodology based on building long-term relationships with clients. Today, he travels the world sharing a message of encouragement about how to "live the good life." His wit, wisdom and motivational style make him a dynamic speaker and podcast host, adept at helping people tap into their full potential and achieve their dreams. He is a New York Times, Amazon and Wall Street Journal best-seller with his latest book, "The Emigrant Edge." Learn more at brianbuffini.com.
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What Makes Buyers Fall in Love with a Home?
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Redfin Ranks the Most Walkable U.S. Cities of 2020
SEATTLE, Feb. 10, 2020 -- New York, San Francisco and Boston are the most walkable cities in the U.S. in 2020, according to a new ranking from Redfin, the technology-powered real estate brokerage. Those three cities, along with Philadelphia, Miami, Chicago, Washington, D.C., Seattle and Oakland, have reigned as the nine most walkable in the U.S. for the last five years. Long Beach, CA has been number 10 since it overtook Baltimore in 2016. The ranking was determined using data from Walk Score®, a Redfin company that rates the walkability of cities, neighborhoods and addresses. Cities where daily errands do not require a car score 90 points and above, a score of 70 to 89 points means most errands can be accomplished on foot and a score of 50 to 69 indicates that some errands can be completed on foot. Below is Redfin's latest ranking of the top 10 U.S. cities (with populations of more than 300,000) for walking: Biggest Walk Score changes Since Redfin last published Walk Score rankings in 2017, Miami and Washington, D.C. each lost about 1.5 points, and New York lost about one, but each retained its place in the rankings. Oakland; Long Beach, CA; Portland, OR and Omaha, which each picked up around two points, had the biggest Walk Score increases since 2017. "A lot of my homebuying clients seek out walkable neighborhoods in Long Beach because it's a way to get a small-town feeling in a big city. In certain neighborhoods, people run into each other all the time because they're out running errands, walking the dog or keeping an eye on neighborhood kids playing outside," said local Redfin agent Costanza Genoese-Zerbi. "Second Street, Belmont Shore, Belmont Heights, Naples, Alamitos Heights and Belmont Park, all of which are within walking distance of schools, stores, restaurants and parks, have become more and more popular over the last few years." Baltimore, which lost four points to hit 65, saw the biggest Walk Score decline of any U.S. city. It's followed by Bakersfield, CA and San Antonio, which each dropped three points to 34 and 35, respectively. To read the full report, please visit: https://www.redfin.com/blog/most-walkable-us-cities-2020 For a ranking of the most walkable Canadian cities of 2020, visit: https://www.redfin.com/blog/most-walkable-canadian-cities-2020 About Redfin Redfin is a technology-powered real estate brokerage, combining its own full-service agents with modern technology to redefine real estate in the consumer's favor. Founded by software engineers, Redfin has the country's #1 brokerage website and offers a host of online tools to consumers, including the Redfin Estimate, the automated home-value estimate with the industry's lowest published error rate for listed homes. Homebuyers and sellers enjoy a full-service, technology-powered experience from Redfin real estate agents, while saving thousands in commissions. Redfin serves more than 90 major metro areas across the U.S. and Canada. The company has helped customers buy or sell homes worth more than $85 billion.
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U.S. Housing Supply Reaches New Low
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Could January be the New April for Home Shopping?
A new realtor.com analysis says "yes" in 20 large metro areas SANTA CLARA, Calif., Dec. 18, 2019 -- Historically, April launched the kickoff of the home shopping season as buyers would come out of their winter hibernation looking for their new home. However, the spring shopping season now starts in January for many of the nation's largest markets, according to new research released today by realtor.com. The analysis is based on average monthly views per listing on realtor.com® from 2015 to 2019. In 2015, the peak month for average views per listing on realtor.com® was April, while January lagged behind by a substantial 16 percent. In contrast, for 2019, the month of January fell 1 percent below February for most monthly views per listing on realtor.com®. And January surged to the top in 20 of the 100 largest metro areas, including New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Seattle, San Francisco, Atlanta, San Jose, Calif., and Denver. In 2018, that was true for just three of the top 100 metros. "As shoppers modify their strategies for navigating a housing market that has become more competitive due to rising prices and low inventory, the search for a home is beginning earlier and earlier," said realtor.com® Senior Economist George Ratiu. "With housing inventory across the U.S. expected to reach record lows in 2020, we expect to see this trend continue into the new year." As of November, the number of homes for sale across the country was down 9.5 percent year-over-year. Additionally, the inventory of entry-level homes priced below $200,000 shrunk by an astonishing 16.5 percent year-over-year. The shift to January's newfound popularity does not mean that the other prime spring months have become less competitive. Realtor.com® data shows that views per listing used to ramp up into spring, but now competition starts high in January and stays high. For example, in 2018, March, the most competitive month, had 21 percent more views per listing than the least competitive month, January. In 2019, that gap between most-and least-competitive months narrowed to a difference of just six percent. What used to be a lopsided bias for April is now a feverish search starting in January, staying consistently competitive across the first four months of the year as hopeful homebuyers look for just the right home. Locally, Seattle had the greatest spike in home shopping in January 2019, with views per property 32 percent higher than the next-highest month. McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas; San Francisco; Atlanta; and San Jose, Calif. metros rounded out the top five markets where January was the most competitive month in 2019. Top Markets Where January was the Most Competitive Month in 2019 Methodology Views per listing are defined as the average monthly page views per property listed for sale on realtor.com®, cited here at the national and metro area levels. About realtor.com® Realtor.com®, The Home of Home Search, offers the most MLS-listed for-sale listings among national real estate portals, and access to information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. Through its Opcity platform, realtor.com® uses data science and machine learning to connect consumers with a real estate professional based on their specific buying and selling needs. Realtor.com® pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today is a trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers by making all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com®.
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Expect Continued Economic Growth, Slower Real Estate Price Gains and Small Chance for Recession in 2020, According to Group of Top Economists
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Low Inventory Drives Home Buyers to Explore Big City Alternatives
Boise, Idaho, McAllen, Texas and Tucson, Ariz. top realtor.com's list of markets set to sizzle in 2020 SANTA CLARA, Calif., Dec. 12, 2019 -- While the U.S. housing market is expected to cool in 2020, certain markets will remain steadfast, fueled by strong local economies, job creation, and available inventory, especially at the entry-level price point. Topping next year's housing markets list are Boise, Idaho, McAllen, Texas, and Tucson, Ariz., according to realtor.com's analysis of the 100 largest metros released today. Based on realtor.com®'s analysis of projected home sales and price data, this year's list highlights the trend of people moving from expensive coastal cities to more affordable areas inland. In fact, nine out of 10 of 2020's hottest markets are not on the coast -- a significant change from last year when four out of 10 markets were on or near the water. This trend is particularly noticeable in Boise, which jumped from the No. 8 position last year to the top spot for 2020. Boise is seeing an influx of out-of-state buyers looking to enjoy the city's amenities at a lower price point compared with places such as California. In the top 10 markets, home sales are expected to increase by 2.4 percent and prices by 3.1 percent on average year-over-year. This is in contrast to a 1.8 percent decrease in home sales and a 0.8 percent increase in sales prices nationwide, according the realtor.com® 2020 housing forecast. Top 10 markets in 2020 Boise, Idaho McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas Tucson, Ariz. Chattanooga, Tenn. Columbia, S.C. Rochester, N.Y. Colorado Springs, Colo. Winston-Salem, N.C. Charleston-North Charleston, S.C. Memphis, Tenn. "Many of the markets on this year's list are late bloomers in the current housing cycle, meaning they still have plenty of inventory and prices are within reach -- a rare combination in recent years," said George Ratiu, senior economist, realtor.com®. "Additionally, a number of the top markets in 2020 are welcoming an influx of buyers from nearby large cities that have become crowded, expensive and lack sufficient inventory." Buyers have more choice With inventory at historically low levels nationwide, home ownership has become challenging, especially for first-time buyers. In fact, this year's list represents the nation's only markets which retain sufficient inventory, especially at the entry level price point. The search for affordability has attracted a large number of buyers into these markets, with active listings decreasing 11 percent year-over-year. However, in many of the top 10 markets, constricted supply is a relatively new issue and the total stock of inventory remains plentiful and in a good position to absorb growth. Sister cities Many of the markets on this year's list are smaller cities that are handling overflow from nearby larger cities that have become crowded and unaffordable. For example, Colorado Springs is becoming a respite from Denver's pricey housing market and Memphis and Chattanooga are affordable options for people looking for Nashville alternatives. University towns Interestingly, the majority of top markets are home to a college or university. This is likely due to the fact that many schools are creating incubators to nurture entrepreneurs and start-ups, helping to fuel local job markets. Rochester, N.Y., for example, is home to two large universities and is benefiting from this trend. Retirement boom Cities like Tucson, Ariz., Winston-Salem, N.C., Columbia, S.C. and Charleston, S.C. have become popular retirement destinations. Many baby boomers are looking to spend their golden years in a warmer climate and escape the high property tax rates that are common in the Northeast. Arizona, North Carolina and South Carolina do not tax Social Security retirement benefits, making these states attractive to older buyers. "As a whole, millennials are driving the housing market, but what's interesting in this year's list is that not all of our cities fall into that category. In fact, only half of this year's top 10 are millennial markets and the other half are being driven by retirees and mid-lifers leaving more expensive coastal cities," added Ratiu. 1. Boise, Idaho Median home price: $295,000 Home price change: +8.1 percent Sales change: +0.3 percent Combined sales and price growth: +8.4 percent Idaho's capital city has seen a boom in population over recent years, having nearly doubled in size since 1990. Many of the city's newcomers are transplants from more expensive coastal cities. Boise is home to a mild four-season climate with a vibrant community that actively takes advantage of the area's easy access to mountains, rivers, lakes and parks. A strong school system, thriving job market and top-notch healthcare draw a diverse crowd to Idaho's capital. A favorable tax structure -- which includes relatively low sales and property tax and no state Social Security tax -- as well as relatively affordable housing has made this area popular for retirees as well as young professionals. Boise is no stranger to realtor.com®'s Top Markets List, it was No. 8 in 2019. 2. McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas Median home price: $152,000 Home price change: +4.0 percent Sales change: +4.4 percent Combined sales and price growth: +8.4 percent Nestled along the Rio Grande and Mexico border in the southern tip of Texas sit the cities of McAllen, Edinburg and Mission. The area has a rich heritage which can be felt throughout and is home to the National Butterfly Center and annual Citrus Fiesta. Affordability is a main driver for many people moving to the area from other parts of Texas and the country -- in fact, McAllen is one of the most affordable markets in the country, with a median home price of just $152,000. Emerging job opportunities coupled with the fact that Texas does not have a state income tax is drawing many young professionals to the area. 3. Tucson, Ariz. Median home price: $230,000 Home price change: +3.3 percent Sales change: +3.4 percent Combined sales and price growth: +6.6 percent Many people are flocking to Tucson, which boasts warm temperatures and 286 days of sunshine each year. The sun-baked city is one of the most popular retirement destinations in the country, however, it is also drawing the younger generation, as the city is home to The University of Arizona. Additionally, large companies including Amazon, Texas Instruments and Caterpillar have recently moved to or expanded within Tucson, creating many new job opportunities. After taking a large hit during the 2008 recession, the area's housing market has bounced back stronger than ever. Sellers are hesitant to put their homes on the market as they feel there is still room for prices to grow. 4. Chattanooga, Tenn. Median home price: $189,000 Home price change: +3.6 percent Sales change: +2.0 percent Combined sales and price growth: +5.6 percent Set along the Tennessee River in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains sits the lively city of Chattanooga with all its Southern charm. The area still prides itself on its small town roots, but also offers residents robust nightlife with a plethora of boutique bars and cozy restaurants. Tennessee has no state income tax, which draws many young professionals and businesses to the area. After Nashville's real estate market took off, investors began looking for other opportunities within Tennessee, and this led many to Chattanooga, which also ranked No. 4 on 2019's Top Markets list. 5. Columbia, S.C. Median home price: $178,000 Home price change: -0.2 percent Sales change: +5.5 percent Combined sales and price growth: +5.3 percent The historically rich city of Columbia is South Carolina's state capital, and holds tight to its small-town roots. Columbia offers residents a high quality of life while housing remains relatively affordable. The city is known for being famously hot, but the weather isn't the only thing heating up. New construction is booming in Columbia and buyers from all over the country are migrating to the area. Columbia is also home to the University of South Carolina, making it a great area for young professionals who enjoy the energy of a college campus. 6. Rochester, N.Y. Median home price: $149,000 Home price change: +0.4 percent Sales change: +4.7 percent Combined sales and price growth: +5.1 percent New York state's third-largest metro boasts a mix of history and innovation. The city is home to two major universities -- The University of Rochester and Rochester Institute of Technology -- that consistently produce top talent and entrepreneurs. It also boasts several medical facilities such as Rochester Regional Health and large employers such as Wegmans, Paychex and Xerox. Despite a healthy job market, the area still enjoys relatively low housing prices. Former home to pioneers and independent thinkers like Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass, Rochester has worked hard to preserve and honor its landmarks. The city's downtown recently underwent a revitalization which is attracting a new group of younger residents who enjoy the area's breweries, art and jazz scene. 7. Colorado Springs, Colo. Median home price: $312,000 Home price change: +6.3 percent Sales change: -1.4 percent Combined sales and price growth: +4.9 percent Recently named the most desirable place to live in the country by U.S. News and World Report, Colorado Springs' residents enjoy an outstanding quality of life with low living costs and easy access to the Rocky Mountains. Colorado Springs has a strong job market and a highly educated workforce in aerospace, defense, cybersecurity and technology. Major employers include Lockheed Martin, Oracle, Hewlett Packard and Progressive Insurance. Residents enjoy the city's beautiful scenery and more than 70 art galleries. Colorado Springs has become a great alternative for those priced out of Denver. Given the close proximity, some choose to live in Colorado Springs and commute to Denver. 8. Winston-Salem, N.C. Median home price: $169,000 Home price change: +0.5 percent Sales change: +3.6 percent Combined sales and price growth: +4.1 percent The fifth largest city in North Carolina, Winston-Salem has become a cultural hub for fine arts and theater. The revitalization of its downtown has added a number of hotels, restaurants and apartment complexes that make it attractive to millennials and retirees alike. This led The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal to rank the city second in their respective lists of most livable downtowns in America. Wake Forest University and several small colleges attract a young crowd, but the city has also been named one of the best places to retire in the U.S. by CBS Moneywatch. Many of the area's residents refer to themselves as "half-backers" or people who moved from the Northeast to Florida, but decided to settle "half of the way" back to be closer to friends and family. 9. Charleston-North Charleston, S.C. Median home price: $270,000 Home price change: +1.9 percent Sales change: +1.2 percent Combined sales and price growth: +3.1 percent South Carolina's largest city is defined by cobblestone streets, horse-drawn carriages and pastel antebellum houses. The historic port city is consistently named one of the best small cities in the world by Conde Nast and the "World's Best City" by Travel + Leisure. Home to Charleston Air Force base and several universities, Charleston attracts a diverse group of residents who enjoy the state's low property tax rates. Major employers in the area include Boeing, Walmart, Bosch and Medical University of South Carolina. Residents and tourists alike enjoy the city's many restaurants and close proximity to the beach. 10. Memphis, Tenn. Median home price: $188,000 Home price change: +3.0 percent Sales change: +0.1 percent Combined sales and price growth: +3.1 percent Elvis's hometown is home to several major employers including FedEx, AutoZone, ServiceMaster, International Paper and First Horizon National, making it an attractive market for jobs and real estate. It's also a great place for millennials and good for singles looking to mingle, as more than half of the city's adult population is not married. Locals enjoy the short commute times, great music scene, culture and professional sports including the NBA's Grizzlies. The most populous city in Tennessee, Memphis is considered a hub for transportation with a bustling airport and easy access to four major freeways. The city also houses about two dozen college campuses along with tourism attractions like Beale Street, Graceland and the National Civil Rights Museum. For more information and methodology, click here. *Median home prices based on the January-August 2019 period. **Home price and sales change are year-over-year estimates through the end of 2020. About realtor.com® Realtor.com®, The Home of Home Search, offers the most MLS-listed for-sale listings among national real estate portals, and access to information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. Through its Opcity platform, realtor.com® uses data science and machine learning to connect consumers with a real estate professional based on their specific buying and selling needs. Realtor.com® pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today is a trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers by making all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com.
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iBuyers Rapidly Snap Up Market Share Across Southern Metros, Redfin Finds
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NAR Identifies 10 Markets Expected to Outperform Over the Next Three to Five Years
WASHINGTON (December 11, 2019) -- The National Association of Realtors identified 10 markets expected to outperform over the next three to five years. In alphabetical order, the markets are: Charleston, South Carolina Charlotte, North Carolina Colorado Springs, Colorado Columbus, Ohio Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas Fort Collins, Colorado Las Vegas, Nevada Ogden, Utah Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, North Carolina Tampa-St. Petersburg, Florida "Some markets are clearly positioned for exceptional longer-term performance due to their relative housing affordability combined with solid local economic expansion," said NAR's Chief Economist Lawrence Yun. "Drawing new residents from other states will also further stimulate housing demand in these markets, but this will create upward price pressures as well, especially if demand is not met by increasing supply." NAR identified the top 10 metro areas based on a myriad of factors, including domestic migration, housing affordability for new residents, consistent job growth relative to the national average, population age structure, attractiveness for retirees and home price appreciation, among other variables. "Potential buyers in these 10 markets will find conditions especially favorable to purchase a home going into the next decade," said NAR President Vince Malta, broker at Malta & Co., Inc., in San Francisco, CA. "The dream of owning a home appears even more attainable for those who move to or are currently living in these markets." Strong job growth is one factor driving up prices in these markets, with payroll employment rising about 2.5% annually in the last three years, higher than the national rate of 1.6%. In Ogden, Las Vegas, Dallas, and Raleigh, job growth rose nearly 3%. Movers flock to these markets at higher rates than the average of the 100 largest U.S. metro areas. In Colorado Springs, recent movers accounted for 21% of the total population, followed by Fort Collins at 17% and Las Vegas at 16%. These areas attract various age groups. For example, 11% of the people who moved to Tampa were 65 years and older, while 54% of recent movers in Durham were between the ages of 18 and 34. In most of these metro areas, about half of recent movers who are renting can afford to buy a home in those respective markets when compared to the nation's 100 largest metro areas. Homeownership rates in these markets are expected to increase due to the relative affordability. To view NAR's Top 10 Outperforming Markets report, visit https://www.nar.realtor/reports/top-ten-outperforming-metro-markets-report The National Association of Realtors® is America's largest trade association, representing more than 1.4 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.
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Brian Buffini Reveals 2020 Real Estate Market Outlook
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Redfin Report: Bidding Wars Remain at 10-Year Low in November
Nationally, just 10% of Redfin homebuying offers faced competition SEATTLE, Dec. 9, 2019 -- Ten percent of offers written by Redfin agents on behalf of their homebuying customers faced a bidding war in November, down from 29% a year earlier and hovering at the 10-year low for the 5th consecutive month, according to a new report from Redfin. This rate is likely to remain low through the end of the year, and begin rising again in early 2020. San Francisco was the only market that remained somewhat competitive in November. The bidding war rate there was 30%, down from 53% a year earlier and down from 34% in October. The month-over-month decline of 3.7 points was slightly below the 2010-2018 average October-to-November decline of 4.6 points. "Almost every home for sale that is in a great location and priced competitively is still receiving multiple offers," said San Francisco Redfin agent Miriam Westberg. "One home we made an offer on last week had 25 other offers! However, homebuyers definitely feel like they can be more selective this year, so homes that don't check every single box may only get a single offer, and tend to take a longer time to sell." Competition was scarce everywhere else in the country, with no other market seeing a bidding war rate higher than 17%. The bidding war rate hit its lowest point in at least five years in November in Chicago, Houston, Portland, OR and Los Angeles. "Even though the number of homes for sale has been falling faster than we normally see this time of year, buyers just aren't feeling any sense of urgency right now," said Redfin chief economist Daryl Fairweather. "The supply and demand data still says that it's a seller's market, but homebuyers working with Redfin agents in places like Portland and Denver are feeling and acting like they're in control. Most of the homes that they are seeing are simply not worth getting into a bidding war over, so they're more than willing to wait until the new year in the hopes that more homes will hit the market." 2019 as a whole has been a welcome reprieve from the frenzied market of years prior, but with fewer new listings hitting the market and more homes selling quickly after being listed, 2020 may be shaping up to swing the pendulum back in the other direction. Houston was the least competitive market in November, with just 1.4% of offers facing a bidding war. Miami was barely above that at 1.7% and Raleigh was the third least competitive market with 2.6% of offers facing competition. Rate of Bidding Wars by Metro Area: November 2019 To read the full report, please click here. About Redfin Redfin is a technology-powered real estate brokerage, combining its own full-service agents with modern technology to redefine real estate in the consumer's favor. Founded by software engineers, Redfin has the country's #1 brokerage website and offers a host of online tools to consumers, including the Redfin Estimate, the automated home-value estimate with the industry's lowest published error rate for listed homes. Homebuyers and sellers enjoy a full-service, technology-powered experience from Redfin real estate agents, while saving thousands in commissions. Redfin serves more than 85 major metro areas across the U.S. and Canada. The company has closed more than $85 billion in home sales.
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Curious Case: A U.S. Housing Market No One Saw Coming
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Home Sellers Will Remain on the Sidelines in 2020
Realtor.com forecast predicts inventory to evaporate making it more challenging for buyers to find a home despite attractive interest rates SANTA CLARA, Calif., Dec. 4, 2019 -- At a time when millennials are reaching key life milestones, the U.S. housing market will continue to slow in 2020 as inventory reaches historic lows and economic uncertainty prompts consumers to pull back on their spending, according to the realtor.com 2020 housing forecast released today. The forecast predicts that despite some relief from new construction, moderating home prices and relatively low interest rates, first-time buyers will continue to struggle with affordability. Sellers will contend with flattening price growth and slowing activity. These trends will drive existing home sales down 1.8 percent to 5.23 million. Highlights of the realtor.com® 2020 forecast include: Home prices will flatten, increasing just 0.8 percent nationwide. Prices will decline in more than 25 percent of the 100 largest metros, including Chicago, Dallas, Las Vegas, Miami and San Francisco. Inventory shortages will prevail and could reach historic lows, especially the entry-level category. Mortgage rates will remain reasonable, averaging 3.85 percent throughout the year. Affordability will remain a key driver for buyers, benefitting mid-sized markets. Millennials – with the oldest members approaching 40 and the biggest cohort turning 30 in 2020 – will surpass 50 percent of all home purchase mortgages. With little incentive to sell, baby boomers will continue to hold onto their homes, while Gen X is more likely to upsize, freeing up some entry level inventory. "Housing remains a solid foundation for the U.S. economy going into 2020," said George Ratiu, senior economist at realtor.com®. "Although economic output is expected to soften – influenced by clouds of uncertainty in the global outlook, business investment and trade – real estate fundamentals remain entangled in a lattice of continuing demand, tight supply and disciplined financial underwriting. Accordingly, 2020 will prove to be the most challenging year for buyers, not because of what they can afford, but rather what they can find." What will 2020 be like for buyers? Buying a home in 2020 will be a mixed bag. It will offer more opportunities for some as the supply of new homes begins to offset inventory pressure that has built over the last four years, interest rates remain reasonable and home prices flatten. The broad price moderation will continue to make mid-sized markets in the Midwest and South attractive. However, the construction of new homes in 2019 was largely isolated to upper-tier of housing and that is unlikely to ease conditions for first-time homebuyers. Additionally, while qualifying for a mortgage could be easier on paper due to stabilizing prices and a still relatively low rate environment, the total number of homes available for sale will hit a record low. What will 2020 be like for sellers? Sellers in 2020 will grapple with dormant price growth and slowing activity, which will require a greater level of patience and a thoughtful approach to pricing. Entry-level home sellers can expect steady competition for their homes, which will keep prices firm. Upper-tier housing is expected to be softer as properties will likely sit on the market longer, requiring greater incentives to close deals. As the market moves toward a more balanced scenario, sellers who adjust to local market conditions can expect to benefit from continuing demand. Forecasted key 2020 housing trends Millennials expand their domination of the market – Demand from those born between 1981-1997 will reach new highs in 2020 with millennials accounting for more than 50 percent of all mortgages by the spring. Several factors are at play here. In 2020, the largest cohort of millennials – 4.8 million of them – will turn 30, a time when many purchase their first home, while the oldest members of the generation will reach 39, often a point when many look to move from the city to the suburbs for family-friendly amenities. The largest generation in history will consolidate their top spot in mortgage originations and effectively outnumber Gen X and baby boomers combined in their share of purchases. Growing economic uncertainty – Although a recession isn't likely in 2020, the economy will show signs of softening. The pullback in business spending is expected to lead to a slowdown in consumer spending. Housing remains the largest single consumer expense, making home-buying activity a major contributor to the U.S. economy and a bellwether for economic expectations. Rising uncertainty about the economic outlook will dampen consumer enthusiasm about spending, leading to a decline in sales and an increase in homeowners' tenure. Low inventory – Despite increases in new construction, next year will once again fail to bring a solution to the inventory shortage that has plagued the housing market since 2015. Inventory could reach a historic low as a steady flow of demand, especially for entry level homes, and declining seller sentiment combine to keep a lid on sales transactions. With housing prices expected to stabilize and concern over economic uncertainty, there will be little incentive for baby boomers to sell in the coming year. The younger Gen X is more likely to upsize and free up entry level homes, but not fast enough to ease inventory woes. Affordability brings secondary markets to the center stage – As buyers are priced out of suburban environments near large metropolitan areas, they will begin searching for family-friendly lifestyles in other metros or across state lines. Cities in Arizona, Nevada and Texas will continue to benefit from shoppers looking for more affordable alternatives to California. Meanwhile, home seekers from expensive Northeast markets will find the warmer options in the Carolinas, Georgia and Florida attractive. Midwest markets will become more attractive, as buyers will find the affordable housing and solid, diversified economies of Ohio, Indiana and Kansas compelling. Election will be 2020 wild card – Along with the presidential election, there will be candidates running for 35 of the 100 seats in the U.S. Senate, along with 435 seats in the House of Representatives. The 2020 elections will be closely watched by consumers and businesses for indications of potential changes. Although the outcome of the presidential election is not directly tied to the performance of the housing market, business optimism and investments, along with consumer confidence and spending do influence economic output, and can also influence housing activity. Looking at housing trends over the past three decades, the pace of sales, price and inventory are intertwined with economic performance – employment, wages, and interest rates. Realtor.com® 2020 Housing Market Forecast Sale and Price Forecast for 100 Largest Markets About realtor.com® Realtor.com®, The Home of Home Search℠, offers the most MLS-listed for-sale listings among national real estate portals, and access to information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. Through its Opcity platform, realtor.com® uses data science and machine learning to connect consumers with a real estate professional based on their specific buying and selling needs. Realtor.com® pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today is a trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers by making all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com.
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Redfin Predicts Homebuyers Will Have Fewer Options, Bidding Wars Will Rebound in 2020
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U.S. Housing Inventory Tightens as Competition Heats Up
Interest rates are making it cheaper to buy a home, if you can find one SANTA CLARA, Calif., Oct. 31, 2019 -- The U.S. housing market showed signs of becoming increasingly competitive as inventory continued to tighten with a drop of nearly 98,000 listings, compared to this time last year, according to realtor.com's October 2019 housing trend report* released today. At the same time, the inventory shortage compounded as homes flew off the market at a faster pace than last year, making it harder for would-be buyers to enter the market despite favorable interest rates. "Owning a home continues to be a priority for buyers, as we head into the cooler months of the year. Driven by the tailwind of sub-4 percent mortgage rates, the steady demand for housing is drying market inventory at an accelerating pace," according to realtor.com® Senior Economist George Ratiu. "With dwindling supply, prices maintain their upward pressure, deepening the affordability challenges for first-time buyers." Spurred by low mortgage rates, the uptick in demand this past spring gobbled up available inventory leaving the U.S. market depleted. Nationally, inventory decreased 6.9 percent in October, an acceleration from September's 4.1 percent drop. This decline amounted to a loss of 98,000 listings, compared to a year ago. Additionally, the volume of new listings hitting the market has decreased by 3.4 percent since last year. Entry-level inventory saw the largest declines, with the number of homes priced under $200,000 dropping by 15.2 percent year-over-year. Meanwhile, mid-tier inventory priced between $200,000 and $750,000 dropped by 4.3 percent year-over-year. The inventory of the nation's most expensive homes saw a slight increase as the inventory of homes selling for more than $750,000 increased by 1.3 percent year-over-year. In the nation's 50 largest metros, inventory declined by 5.3 percent year-over-year. The metros which saw the biggest drop in inventory were San Diego-Carlsbad, Calif. (-20.1 percent), Rochester, N.Y. (-20.1 percent), and Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Ariz. (-20.0 percent). In addition to having less inventory compared to last year, homes also sold more quickly. Nationally, homes sold in 66 days in October, three days faster than last year. Raleigh, N.C. (60 days); Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Conn. (64 days); and Birmingham-Hoover, Ala. (67 days) saw the largest decreases in days on market with properties spending 11, 9 and 9 fewer days on the market than last year, respectively. On the flip-side, properties in Los Angeles-Long Beach, Anaheim, Calif. (55 days); San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, Calif. (42 days), and Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, Nev. (49 days); sold 14, 11, and 11 days more slowly, respectively. The U.S. median listing price continues to increase due to solid demand, growing by 4.3 percent year-over-year, to $312,000 in October. Of the 50 largest U.S. metros, 43 saw year-over-year gains in median listing prices. Birmingham-Hoover, Ala. (+15.4 percent); Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, Calif. (+13.9 percent); and Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Ariz. (+13.0 percent); posted the highest year-over-year median list price growth in October. The steepest declines in median list price were seen in Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minn.-Wis. (-2.9 percent), Louisville/Jefferson County, Ky.-Ind. (-2.9 percent) and Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, Texas (-1.6 percent). *Editor's Note With the release of its October 2019 housing trends report, realtor.com® incorporated a new and improved methodology for capturing and reporting housing inventory trends and metrics. The new methodology uses the latest and most accurate data mapping of listing statuses to yield a cleaner and more consistent measurement of active listings at both the national and local level. The new methodology also allows realtor.com® to achieve more consistency and stability in measurements across markets and in each market over time. As a result of these changes, the data released today will not be directly comparable with previous releases and realtor.com® economics blog posts. However, future data releases, including historical data, will consistently apply the new methodology. About realtor.com® Realtor.com®, The Home of Home Search, offers the most MLS-listed for-sale listings among national real estate portals, and access to information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. Through its Opcity platform, realtor.com® uses data science and machine learning to connect consumers with a real estate professional based on their specific buying and selling needs. Realtor.com® pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today is a trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers by making all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com.
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Migration Trends Reach Record High as 26% of Home Searchers Look to Change Metros
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CoreLogic Releases Most Recent HPI Forecast Validation Report
Analysis shows 16 metros had forecasts with less than a 1% difference from actual values CoreLogic, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its latest CoreLogic HPI Forecast Validation Report that compares its 12-month CoreLogic Home Price Index (HPI) Forecast to the actual CoreLogic Home Price Index. The report compares the changes in national and key metro-level forecasts made in June 2018 to the actual HPI index, which includes data through June 2019. The CoreLogic HPI Forecast is a projection of home prices using the CoreLogic HPI and other economic variables. National values are derived from state-level forecasts by weighing indices according to the number of housing units for each state. Published every six months, the Forecast Validation Report is designed to provide transparency into CoreLogic forecasting abilities. The report showed: Sixteen large metros had forecasts with less than a 1% difference from actual values, including the Phoenix, Houston and Milwaukee metros all coming in within 0.3%. The top 10 major metros all had forecasts within 0.5% of actual values. The national forecast prediction of a 5.7% increase was within 2.4% of the 3.3% increase of the HPI for the 12-month period ending in June 2019. Long-term affordability concerns, coupled with consumer sentiment about the general economic climate along with other economic factors caused actual home prices to increase at a slower rate. The most accurate metro-level forecast was for the Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, AZ area, which at 5.9% came on target of the actual HPI increase of 5.9%. The widest metro gap was in the San Jose, California metro areas, with a 13% over-estimation of actual increase. CoreLogic noted that the variance in this under-valued metro was mainly due to a concern over long-term affordability. Severe inventory shortages and rising interest rates impacted the forecasts of several metros - including the Chicago and San Francisco areas - reflecting the overall market volatility of the past 12 months. Slowing home price appreciation across many markets over the last 12 months caused much more volatility in housing markets than has been observed over the last three years. "The latest HPI Forecast Validation report continues to demonstrate why CoreLogic is the gold standard when it comes to home price forecasting," said Ann Regan, executive, product management for CoreLogic. "While our national forecast results reflect the difficulties of forecasting in an extremely volatile market, our forecasts were still able to provide accurate, region-specific forecasts for major metro areas, providing HPI clients with the reliability they need in the current market." About CoreLogic CoreLogic, the leading provider of property insights and solutions, promotes a healthy housing market and thriving communities. Through its enhanced property data solutions, services and technologies, CoreLogic enables real estate professionals, financial institutions, insurance carriers, government agencies and other housing market participants to help millions of people find, acquire and protect their homes. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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Housing Trends Foreshadow Housing Shortage Ahead
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The Top U.S. Destinations For Movers Aren't Where You Think
Medium-sized metros offering relative affordability, strong employment and large boomer populations entice the most out-of-state buyers SANTA CLARA, Calif., Aug. 21, 2019 -- The typical home buyer only moves 15 miles from their current residence, but realtor.com's Top Moving Destinations analysis shows that metros that offer relative affordability, strong employment, and large boomer populations can entice people to pull the trigger on an out-of-state home purchase. Released today, the list is made up of mostly medium-sized markets, including: Charleston, S.C.; Boise, Idaho; Honolulu; Columbia, S.C.; Fort Myers, Fla.; Portland, Maine; Sarasota, Fla.; Greenville, S.C.; Tucson, Ariz.; and Las Vegas. Metros were ranked based on which area received the most out-of-state views on realtor.com® in the second quarter of 2019. Buyers Seek Bargains Without Going Too Far "Home prices have risen for seven consecutive years, far outpacing salary growth. Although interest rates are the lowest they have been in three years, cost has become a deal breaker for many buyers, especially in pricey West Coast metros," said realtor.com® Senior Economist, George Ratiu. "But instead of giving up on the American Dream, many buyers have decided to look for a home in medium-sized metros outside their state that offer price relief, and a similar lifestyle." Seven of the top 10 moving destinations attracted non-local buyers looking at homes with median prices 3 percent to 34 percent less expensive than their home markets, in Q2 2019. However, these destinations are not necessarily cheap; in fact, they are 16 percent higher than the national median of $315,000. But when compared to home prices in their current metro areas, they feel like a steal. For instance, Boise's median listing price of $372,500 looks more attractive compared to Los Angeles's $766,800 and Salt Lake City's $434,900. Movers are also looking to stay relatively close to home by seeking out markets that are just a quick plane ride away. Charleston, the No. 1 moving destination in America, is sought out by buyers in neighboring markets of Charlotte, N.C.; Atlanta; and New York. Boise, No. 2 on the list, is especially attractive to those in Los Angeles, Salt Lake City, and Sacramento, Calif. Booming Jobs and Low Taxes Drive Up Demand The promise of high paying jobs has always been a catalyst for buyer demand, but it's especially true for those considering relocation to a new state. According to realtor.com®'s analysis, the top 10 destinations have an average unemployment rate of 3.3 percent, which is 30 basis points lower than the national average, and 38 basis points below what out-of-state buyers encounter in their home metros. Sweetening the financial deal for out-of-state buyers are the tax incentives in these destinations. Eight of the top 10 are located in states that have lower overall tax burdens compared to the national average of 8.6, including Cape Coral-Fort Myers and North Port-Sarasota, Fla. with a 6.6 percent overall burden; Boise at 7.8 percent; and the three South Carolina metros- Charleston, Greenville and Columbia at 7.6 percent, according to WalletHub. Hot Spots Retirees and Vacationers The majority of the metros on the list are sunny locales that are popular with vacationers and retirees alike, as well as snowbirds escaping the Northern winters. In fact, the average population share of those aged 65-years and older was 19.5 percent among the top 10, compared to 16.2 nationally. The top retiree markets on this list were Sarasota, Fla.; Fort Myers, Fla.; and Tucson, Ariz. whose populations aged 65 years and older accounted for 32.3 percent, 28.7 percent, and 20.0 percent of the population, respectively. "The fact that the majority of the metros on the list are hot spots for retirees signals a shift in boomer preferences from the expensive cities where they built their careers to the more easy-going feel of vacation communities," added Ratiu. "Some of them may be initiating the purchase of their retirement home as a second home, while others may be purchasing it in their post-career stage of life." Additionally, 7.9 percent of homes sold in these markets are secondary homes, compared to the national average of just 2.7 percent. Fort Myers, Fla.; North Port, Fla.; and Tucson, Ariz. had the highest share of secondary home sales among the top 10 with 17.6 percent, 16.4 percent, and 9.2 percent, respectively. For more information, please visit: https://www.realtor.com/research/q2-2019-cross-market-demand-report/ About realtor.com® Realtor.com®, The Home of Home Search℠, offers the most MLS-listed for-sale listings among national real estate portals, and access to information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. Through its Opcity platform, realtor.com® uses data science and machine learning to connect consumers with a real estate professional based on their specific buying and selling needs. Realtor.com® pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today is a trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers by making all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com.
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Realtor.com Predicts Market Shift That Could Impact Buyers Well Into 2020
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Homes Becoming More Affordable Despite Rising Prices
National median listing price sets new record at $315,000; 74 of nation's 100 largest metros become more affordable than last year SANTA CLARA, Calif., June 6, 2019 -- Nearly three-quarters of the 100 largest U.S. metros -- including some of the priciest like San Jose, Calif., and San Francisco -- are more affordable than this time last year, despite a continued upward swing in median home prices, according to two new research reports released today by realtor.com. The trends are based on realtor.com's May 2019 monthly housing trend report and REALTORS and realtor.com Affordability Distribution Curve and Score Report, which showed increasing inventory, rising wages, and declining mortgage rates have offset slowing price increases in some local areas, making a larger share of homes affordable to buyers -- especially in the mid-to upper-tier price range. Realtor.com® May data shows the U.S. median listing price continued its upward hike, increasing 6 percent year-over-year to $315,000 -- a new record high. However, the 6 percent year-over-year increase in the median listing price was the slowest pace of growth since April 2015. National inventory grew by 3 percent, and homes typically spent 53 days on the market--one day less than last May. The most dramatic change in the U.S. housing market landscape is affordability, which realtor.com® defines as the share of for-sale homes a buyer is able to afford in their market at their income. Driven by inventory growth and lower mortgage rates, 74 out of the nation's 100 largest metros became more affordable in April 2019 compared to the previous year. This trend is a rapid acceleration from last month when only 44 metros were more affordable than the previous year. "Lower mortgage rates, higher wages and more homes for sale have helped counteract rising home prices, and ultimately, made it so that buyers are able to afford more than last year," said Danielle Hale, realtor.com®'s chief economist. "However, the boost in affordability has yet to translate into more home sales perhaps because--while the shift in trend is welcome, the current monthly savings are small and some buyers may be waiting for markets to tip further in their favor." Compared to national trends, the 10 markets with the greatest increases in affordability were San Jose, Calif.; Des Moines, Iowa; San Francisco; Lakeland, Fla.; Atlanta; Portland, Ore.; Cape Coral, Fla.; Austin, Texas; and Dallas. These markets are distinguished by rising incomes, decreasing listing prices, and a significant increase in available homes for sale. On average, incomes grew an estimated 6 percent year-over-year, compared to the 3.5 percent increase the top 100 largest metros saw. At the same time, median home listing prices fell an average of 2 percent, and inventory increased an average of 26 percent. This compared to 4.4 percent price and 6.5 percent inventory growth in the top 100 metros. Hale added, "Despite the encouraging trends, entry-level buyers will likely continue to struggle to find homes in their price range as the majority of the inventory gains continue to be in mid-to upper-tier homes in more expensive markets." In April, the number of homes priced above $750,000 -- more than double the national median -- increased 11 percent year-over-year, while the number homes priced below $200,000 decreased by 8 percent year-over-year. Similarly, increases in affordability are predominantly focused in pricier markets, especially along the West Coast. For example, San Jose, one of the nation's most expensive metros, saw the greatest boost in affordability, but it was principally driven by improvements for 80th and 90th percentile income earners. Meaning, San Jose became more affordable compared to this time last year, but the majority of affordability increases were only felt by the area's top income earners. For more information, please visit: https://www.realtor.com/research/may-2019-data Metros With Greatest Increases in Affordability About realtor.com® Realtor.com®, The Home of Home Search, offers the most MLS-listed for-sale listings among national real estate portals, and access to information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. Through its Opcity platform, realtor.com® uses data science and machine learning to connect consumers with a real estate professional based on their specific buying and selling needs. Realtor.com®pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today is a trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers by making all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com®.
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REALTORS and Social Media: Latest RPR Survey Reveals Trends
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Spring Home Buyers Eye Homes in Need of Renovation
Nearly 60 percent of 2019 home buyers are considering a home that needs renovations; 95 percent expect a little TLC will result in a positive return on their investment SANTA CLARA, Calif., April 15, 2019 -- Nearly 60 percent of all spring home shoppers are considering a home that needs renovating, as rising home prices and limited entry-level inventory continue to be a hurdle, according to realtor.com®'s spring home buyer survey announced today. Just over half of home buyers considering a home that needs some TLC are willing to spend more than $20,000 on the renovation, while the vast majority - 95 percent of them - are optimistic they will get a positive return on their renovation investment. Realtor.com® conducted the online survey through Toluna Research in March, consisting of 1,015 respondents planning to purchase a home in the next 12 months. "The combination of rising home prices and limited entry-level homes for sale is prompting many home shoppers to consider homes that need renovating," said Danielle Hale, realtor.com®'s chief economist. "Replete with inspiration at their fingertips - like Pinterest, Instagram, and various home renovation TV shows - some home shoppers are comfortable tackling home renovation jobs to find a home that balances their needs with their budget." According to the survey, roughly three out of five home shoppers under 55 years-old are considering a home this spring that needs renovating. Middle-aged shoppers, 35-54 years-old, were the most likely to consider a home that needs renovating, at 65 percent. Middle-aged shoppers are more likely to be current homeowners and their experience with maintaining and improving their existing home may give them the confidence to tackle renovations, especially when motivated by trying to find a home that fits their needs within their budget, Hale noted. Just 59 percent of younger home shoppers aged 18-34 years-old, who are less likely to be current owners, are considering a home in need of renovation. Less than a third of buyers older than 55 years-old would consider a home that needs renovations. Just over half of spring home shoppers considering homes in need of renovation - 51 percent - are willing to spend more than $20,000 on their home renovation. Twenty eight percent are willing to spend up to $10,000, and 22 percent are willing to spend between $10,001 and $20,000. According to realtor.com data, a major kitchen remodel will cost around $66,000, while a minor remodel will cost around $22,000. Similarly, an upscale bathroom remodel will cost you around $64,000, while a midrange bathroom remodel runs about $20,000. While home renovations can be costly, home shoppers are optimistic they will get a positive return on their investment. According to the survey, 95 percent of home shoppers considering a home that needs renovations expect a positive return of some sort on their investment. Nearly a quarter - 24 percent - expect a positive return of more than 50 percent. A kitchen upgrade was the No.1 home renovation chosen by nearly 30 percent of respondents considering homes that need to be renovated. This is not particularly surprising since both this year and last year an updated kitchen was first among the top three features sought by potential home shoppers. A kitchen upgrade was followed by a bathroom renovation at just over a quarter - 26 percent, and new wood flooring at 20 percent. Eighteen percent considered a hardwood flooring refinish, and the same share considered a complete overhaul kitchen renovation. Among spring home shoppers considering a home in need of renovation, nearly 60 percent said home renovation television has made them more optimistic regarding home renovations, according to realtor.com's survey. Whether it is seeing the project unfold in a tidy 30 minute segment, or just getting inspired by the before and after shots, home shoppers are turning to home renovations to make their dream home when finding one as-is turns out to be difficult. About realtor.com® Realtor.com®, The Home of Home Search, offers an extensive inventory of for-sale and rental listings, and access to information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. It pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today is the trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers by making all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com.
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Gen Xers' Adult Children Influence Their Buying Decisions, Younger Millennials Become Buying Force According to Realtor Report
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Millennials Now Taking on More Mortgages than Any Other Generation
Millennials now represent 42 percent of all new home loans, and are buying outside major metro areas, study shows SANTA CLARA, Calif., Feb. 20, 2019 -- Realtor.com®, the Home of Home Search, today released new survey data revealing members of the millennial generation have increased their home buying purchase power and now boast the largest share of new home loans by dollar volume, larger than both Generation X and the baby boomer generation. These insights, based on a realtor.com® analysis of residential mortgage loan originations from Optimal Blue, show that while the median home buying price millennials take on is still lower than that of Generation X or baby boomers, millennials are showing interest in more affordable markets. Additionally, millennials are making lower down payments and taking on larger mortgages when compared to Gen Xers and baby boomers.   "Millennials are getting older, with better jobs and deeper pockets, allowing them to expand their collective purchase power, and hence, their footprint in the market," said Javier Vivas, director of economic research at realtor.com®. "The stereotype that millennials primarily choose to buy homes and live in large metro areas isn't the reality. Results show millennials' expansion is more heavily conditioned by affordability than in prior years, so their eyes are set on less traditional secondary markets where homes and jobs are now available and plentiful." Affordability is such a key factor for millennial home buyers that this generation is moving to places previous generations have not, like Buffalo, N.Y., the top affordable market for millennials, according to this study. Millennials Now Have More Buying Power Millennials are still primarily in the life stage that requires starter homes. Despite a lower median purchase price ($238,000) than the two generations before them, (with baby boomers and Gen Xers spending an average of $264,000 and $289,000, respectively), millennials are increasing their purchase price at a faster rate than previous generations, indicative of this generation starting to move beyond starter homes. Since early 2017, millennials have been the largest mortgage purchasers by the number of loans originated, surpassing Generation X as the leader in January 2017. As 2018 came to a close, millennials took on nearly half (45 percent) of all new mortgages, compared to 36 percent for Generation X, and 17 percent for baby boomers. In November 2018, millennials finally overtook Generation X as having the largest share of new loans by dollar volume, with a share of 42 percent in December, compared to a share of 40 percent for Generation X and 17 percent for baby boomers. This indicates millennials are willing to take on larger mortgages than any other generation to fulfill their dreams of homeownership. Millennial Home Buying is Driven by Affordability In addition to increasing their buying power and taking on larger mortgages, the data shows millennials have consistently made lower down payments than other generations since 2015. While other generations have increased their down payments in response to rising prices, millennials have not been able to increase their down payments as much as older generations. Millennial down payments averaged 8.8 percent in December 2018, compared to 11.9 percent for Generation X and 17.7 percent for the more equity-rich baby boomers. Given that the majority of millennial home buyers are searching for their first homes and do not bring equity from a previous home, it's no surprise they are putting down smaller down payments. This is likely a driver of their activity in more affordable markets, where their money goes further. Top U.S. Markets for Home Buyers Varies by Generation Within the last year, millennials have moved to affordable areas with strong job markets where they have more buying power. At the end of 2018, the median price of a mortgaged home purchased by millennials was $238,000, $26,000 less than the median price of a home mortgaged by baby boomers ($264,000) and $51,000 than Generation X ($289,000). The top five markets where millennials now generate more than 50 percent of the mortgages and their share grew by more than four percent are: Buffalo, N.Y. Pittsburgh Milwaukee Cincinnati Columbus, Ohio As members of Generation X are in their prime income-earning years, they purchased homes in strong job markets and secondary home markets, with five of the 10 markets on the list having unemployment rates higher than the national rate of 3.7 percent. The top five markets where Gen X purchased a large and/or growing share of homes are: Los Angeles Providence, R.I. Bridgeport, Conn. Jacksonville, Fla. Atlanta Many boomers are retired or rapidly approaching retirement, and therefore, showed a strong preference for buying homes in markets within primarily low-tax states or markets that are lower-cost than nearby metros, presumably to maintain wealth earned during their working years throughout their senior years. The top five markets where boomers made up a large and/or growing share of mortgaged purchases are: Knoxville, Tenn. Sacramento, Calif. Memphis, Tenn. Oklahoma City Riverside, Calif. About realtor.com® Realtor.com®, The Home of Home Search℠, offers an extensive inventory of for-sale and rental listings, and access to information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. It pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today is the trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers by making all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [NASDAQ: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com®.
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Homes.com Study: Romantic Breakups Tie with Joblessness in Triggering 'Boomerang' Behavior
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Owning a Home Could Help You Get a Date with That Special Someone
Nearly 60 percent of millennial singles indicate homeownership makes a potential mate more attractive SANTA CLARA, Calif., Feb. 7, 2019 -- Realtor.com, the Home of Home Search, today released new survey data that shows owning a home might make you more attractive to that special someone you've had your eye on, especially if they are a millennial or a woman. Singles looking to boost their chances of dating a homeowner may want to considering living in the South or in the Midwest because they are home to the biggest shares of single female and male homeowners, respectively, according to the analysis. "Attractiveness is in the eye of the beholder, and this survey data suggests that many beholders find homeownership attractive, perhaps using it as a signal for financial savviness and success," said Danielle Hale, realtor.com®'s chief economist. "Single Millennials seem to find homeownership in a potential partner especially attractive, even if only one quarter feels that it is important." The survey, which included 500 people who identified as single and was conducted in late January, found that 46 percent of all singles thought homeownership made a potential partner attractive or very attractive. Women were more likely than men to agree with this, as 48 percent of women found it made a potential partner more attractive, versus 43 percent of men. Men, however, were slightly more likely to say that it made their potential partner very attractive. The survey also asked singles how important it was for a potential partner to be a homeowner. Similar to before, women were more likely than men to agree it was either important or very important that their partner was a homeowner. But the gap between genders was wider than when asking about attractiveness of homeowners, coming in at 29 and 19 percent for women and men, respectively. As a whole, 24 percent of single respondents felt it was important for their partner to be a homeowner. Millennials show strong desire for homeownership in their partner Millennials were the most likely to feel that homeownership boosted someone's attractiveness, with nearly 60 percent of the generation agreeing with the statement. Millennials also were the generation most likely to agree that it was either important or very important for their partner to be a homeowner, as indicated by 26 percent. Single male homeownership highest in the Midwest For those looking to find a potential home-owning male partner, the Midwest is going to be the best bet. The market with the greatest share of single male homeowners is Detroit, where they make up 23.4 percent of all males. It was followed by St. Louis with 21.3 percent, Minneapolis with 21.3 percent, Cleveland with 21.2 percent, and Pittsburgh with 19.9 percent.* Detroit, the top market for single men homeowners, has a median home price of $220,000, followed by St. Louis at $198,000, Minneapolis at $353,000, Cleveland at $170,000, and Pittsburgh at $170,000. On average, homes in these markets sell in 82 days, five days faster than the national median of 87 days. These markets have a high volume of young people, and relatively low median listing prices. In markets such as Detroit and St. Louis, with median list prices of $220,000 and $198,000, respectively, the lower price point has helped boost homeownership among singles. Single female homeownership strong in the South and Midwest Single women are one of the fastest growing demographics in the housing market, according to a recent realtor.com analysis. This trend can be seen strongest in Detroit, where single women homeowners makeup 23.1 percent of all women, followed by 21.4 percent in Baltimore, 21.2 percent in Charlotte, N.C., 20.7 percent in Philadelphia and 20.7 percent in Minneapolis. Detroit, the top market for single women homeowners, has a median home price of $220,000, followed by Baltimore at $297,000, Charlotte, N.C. at $320,000, Philadelphia at $250,000, and Minneapolis at $353,000. On average, homes in these markets sell in a rapid 75 days, 12 days faster than the national median of 87 days. Strong job opportunities and growing economies that draw many young professionals to the areas are also helping keep them in these markets as homeowners. Affordable home prices have also helped singles achieve homeownership in these markets. *Homeownership data by gender and relationship status sourced from IPUMS-USA, University of Minnesota, www.ipums.org. Calculations based on ownership among household heads aged 18-54. About realtor.com® Realtor.com®, The Home of Home Search℠, offers an extensive inventory of for-sale and rental listings, and access to information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. It pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today is the trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers by making all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com®.
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Migration Trend Reaches a Record High as 1 in 4 People Searching for a Home Looks to Change Metros
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Generation Z Needs to Start Saving $304 a Month Now to Buy a Home By Age 30
Location will be deciding factor in Generation Z's homeownership success; Midwest and South offer more affordable options SANTA CLARA, Calif., Jan. 31, 2019 -- Nearly 80 percent of Generation Z wants to own a home before age 30, and a new analysis released today by realtor.com®, The Home of Home Search℠, shows they will need to save $304 every month for the next 12 years to buy with a 10 percent down payment plus closing costs on a median priced home. According to the analysis, the median priced home in the U.S. is projected to cost $386,310 in 2031, when today's 18-year-old members of Generation Z turn 30. The analysis, which includes a 13-year forecast for median home prices in top 100 metros and different down payment savings plans, projects Generation Z will need to save the most to purchase a home in San Jose, Calif. where they will need to save $1,962 per month. The next most expensive locale is San Francisco ($1,439/mo.) followed by Los Angeles ($979/mo.), Honolulu ($946/mo.), and Oxnard, Calif. ($877/mo.). According to realtor.com®'s analysis of Optimal Blue mortgage data, in 2018 the typical under-30 home buyer used a seven percent down payment to successfully complete their home purchase. On average, in the top 10 most expensive metros, members of Generation Z will need to save an average of $948 a month, starting on their 18th birthday, to afford a 10 percent down payment and typical closing costs by the time they turn 30 years old. The median priced home in 2019 is expected to cost $265,000, but over the course of the next 12 years, the price is expected to increase nearly 50 percent, specifically another 46 percent to $386,310. This assumes prices grow at a very modest 3.2 percent per year over the next 12 years. "Choosing to live in one of the U.S.'s larger and more expensive metros, especially on the West Coast, is going to make homeownership a difficult task, but that doesn't mean that Gen Z should give up on their dreams," said Danielle Hale, realtor.com®'s chief economist. "The most important thing they can do is start saving as much as possible early on and let compound interest do the heavy lifting for them. They may also want to consider more affordable areas or different down payment amounts. Some widely available programs allow down payments as low as 3 percent, but a lower down payment can mean higher ongoing monthly costs. As with most decisions, there are pros and cons and a buyer needs to think these through to determine what's best for them." Midwest and South offer opportunities for an easier savings plan While the analysis reveals potentially daunting West Coast future home prices and monthly savings amounts, Generation Z can look to the Midwest and South for more affordable housing options. Youngstown, Ohio, topped the list of the most affordable metros, where Generation Z would only have to save $108 per month. It was followed by McAllen, Texas ($111/mo.), Toledo, Ohio ($141/mo.), Wichita, Kan. ($154/mo.), and Little Rock, Ark. ($156/mo.). With an average median home price of $191,381 in 2031 for the top 10 most affordable metros, an 18-year-old member of Generation Z will need to save an average of $150 a month, starting on their 18th birthday, to afford a 10 percent down payment by the time they turn 30. That comes out to saving $798 a month less than the average monthly saving required for the top 10 most expensive metros. 20 percent down payments paint a different picture While 10 percent down or less is far more common among first-time and younger home buyers, some members of Generation Z may want to use a 20 percent down payment to qualify for a lower mortgage rate and have a much lower monthly payment, but that might not be feasible in the nation's most expensive metros. On average, for the 10 most expensive metros in the U.S., Generation Z will need to save $1,645 a month for a 20 percent down payment and closing costs. That is $697 more every month than if they are aiming to put 10 percent down. While 20 percent has historically been the benchmark, this isn't true for first time homebuyers, and Generation Z should consider varying levels of down payments when planning to purchase a home, especially in higher cost metros in the U.S. Methodology: This analysis assumed an 18-year-old member of Generation Z started saving on his or her birthday, contributing the exact amount every month into a savings account with a fixed three percent annual return, compounded monthly. They will make their home purchase in 2031 on their 30th birthday, after making exactly 144 deposits over exactly 12 years. The calculated savings amount required includes money for a downpayment and typical closing costs of about 3.6 percent for first-time home buyers. Forecast median home price data comes from Moody's Analytics (economy.com). About realtor.com® Realtor.com®, The Home of Home Search, offers an extensive inventory of for-sale and rental listings, and access to information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. It pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today is the trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers by making all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [NASDAQ: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com®.
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Average U.S. Home Seller Profits at 12-Year High of $61,000 in 2018
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Number of Homes for Sale Is Up, But Fewer Homes Are Affordable to Middle Class Buyers
Affordability Keeps Many Homes Out of Reach for the Average Homebuyer, Even As Inventory Rises SEATTLE, Jan. 23, 2019 -- Although the supply of homes for sale is up in many markets, both the number and share of homes that are affordable to a typical household has decreased from a year ago, according to a new report from Redfin, the next-generation real estate brokerage. The report considers all homes that were active on the market at any point in 2018 and 2017 and calculates the share of homes in each metro area that were affordable during each year to a household making the median income in that metro area. Just 14 percent of homes that were on the market in 2018 in the San Jose metro area were affordable on the median household income in the area of $117,000. This is a big drop from 2017, when 26 percent of homes that were for sale were affordable. In Los Angeles, 16 percent of homes for sale were affordable in 2018, down from 20 percent in 2017. In Seattle the share of affordable homes for sale dropped from 58 percent in 2017 to 46 percent in 2018. Home price gains and interest rate increases through 2018 combined to considerably reduce home affordability. Although the number of homes for sale is increasing, the number of affordable homes on the market has decreased in most metro areas. "Homeownership is increasingly out of reach for the typical American," said Redfin chief economist Daryl Fairweather. "Over the last few years builders have focused on luxury homes, and there hasn't been enough construction of affordable starter homes." In many metro areas, even as the number of homes for sale has increased, the number of affordable homes for sale has shrunk over the past year. In the San Diego area, there were 10 percent more homes for sale during 2018 than 2017, but the number of affordable homes for sale fell 16 percent. In the Seattle metro, there were 4 percent more homes for sale, but the number of affordable homes for sale fell 17 percent. Although the share of homes for sale that were affordable on a median income fell from 2017 to 2018 in all 49 of the metro areas we analyzed, there were a few metro areas where the number of affordable homes for sale increased, including Hartford, CT (+19%), Jacksonville, FL (+9%) and Nashville, TN (+4%). Homebuyers looking for affordable options still have plenty of choices in metro areas like St. Louis (84%), Minneapolis (82%) and Pittsburgh (82%). Strong growth in jobs and wages may also help buyers make up some lost ground as well. "We expect builders to shift their attention to more affordable homes during 2019," added Fairweather, "which along with rezoning efforts by local governments should reduce this pressure to some degree over time." To read the full report, including a table of the number and share of affordable homes for sale in each major metro area, please click here. About Redfin Redfin is the next-generation real estate brokerage, combining its own full-service agents with modern technology to redefine real estate in the consumer's favor. Founded by software engineers, Redfin has the country's #1 brokerage website and offers a host of online tools to consumers, including the Redfin Estimate, the automated home-value estimate with the industry's lowest published error rate for listed homes. Homebuyers and sellers enjoy a full-service, technology-powered experience from Redfin real estate agents, while saving thousands in commissions. Redfin serves more than 85 major metro areas across the U.S. The company has closed more than $60 billion in home sales.
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Redfin Ranks the 10 Hottest Affordable Neighborhoods of 2019
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Homeownership Part of American Dream; Housing Costs Deterrent for Non-Owners
WASHINGTON (January 14, 2019) – Homeowners and non-homeowners both strongly consider homeownership part of the American Dream. That is according to new consumer survey data from the National Association of Realtors®, which revealed that among those polled, approximately 75 percent of non-homeowners believe homeownership is part of their American Dream, while nine in 10 current homeowners said the same. NAR's Aspiring Home Buyers Profile analyzed 2018 quarterly consumer insights from its Housing Opportunities and Market Experience (HOME) survey to capture the housing expectations and sentiments of non-homeowners – both renters and those living with a family member. When non-homeowners were asked for the chief reason why they currently do not own a home, most respondents said it was because they were currently unable to afford a mortgage. Over the last quarter of 2018, 43 percent of non-owners said they did not own a home because they were not in a position to purchase, which was down from the third quarter of 2018, when 49 percent of non-homeowners answered the same. Also in the 4th quarter, 33 percent of non-homeowners said they do not own because current life circumstances are not suitable for ownership, while 16 percent said they need the flexibility of renting. In addition, the survey looked at the main reason why non-homeowners would buy a home in the future. Throughout 2018, 28 to 31 percent of non-owners each quarter said an improvement in their financial situation would be the top reason that would encourage them to buy a home in the future. In each quarter, 26 to 30 percent of non-owners said a change in lifestyle – such as getting married, starting a family or retiring – would be the primary reason they would make a future home purchase. Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist, says unaffordable housing has caused a number of potential buyers to hold off on purchasing a new home. "The lack of affordable and moderately priced homes has forced non-homeowners to delay achieving that part of the American Dream. However, as the survey confirms, significant lifestyle changes like marriage or starting a family often spur non-owners to pursue home-ownership." For this year's survey, homeowners and non-owners were also asked about adult family or friends moving into their homes, the span of time this individual(s) lived within the household, and if they thought about moving to a new home because of the change. According to the survey, 11 percent of homeowners had an adult child move into their residence, while 5 percent of non-owners had an adult move into their home. Of those who had someone move into their home, 44 percent said that the individual intended to live with them for over one year or to stay permanently. Forty-four percent of non-owners reported that the individual planned on living with them for between six months to one year. Eighty-eight percent of those surveyed who had someone move into their home reported that their living situation remained acceptable and therefore did not warrant consideration of moving into a different home. Twelve percent said they did consider moving or ultimately did move due to their home situation changing. "While home sales were slightly down in 2018, there is still a sizable pent-up housing demand. Economic growth, interest rates, and the supply of moderately priced-homes will dictate how well the real estate industry will do this year," said Yun." About NAR's HOME survey In each quarter of 2018, a sample of U.S. households was surveyed via random-digit dial, including half via cell phones and the other half via landlines. The survey was conducted by established survey research firm, TechnoMetrica Market Intelligence. A total of 8,140 household responses are represented. The National Association of Realtors® is America's largest trade association, representing more than 1.3 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.
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Renting a Home More Affordable than Buying in 59 Percent of U.S. Housing Markets
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Women, Millennials, and Hispanics Will Shape the Future of Housing
Ten of the top 20 and seven of the top 10 fastest-growing buyer first names are predominantly millennial female names SANTA CLARA, Calif., Jan. 9, 2019 -- The future of real estate will be significantly influenced by women, millennials and Hispanics, according to realtor.com®'s analysis of first names on 2018 home sales deeds. Single women are one of the fastest-growing demographics in the housing market, according to the data. Although older Baby Boomer and Silent Generation women are leading the charge, the increase in deeds with female names is particularly visible when comparing genders within the millennial generation. Looking solely at names with a peak year between 1981 and 1997, millennial female names are outpacing millennial male names, with home sales with female names beating male name home sales by 1.5 percent (6.9 percent versus 4.4 percent on average year-over-year, respectively). Seven of the top 10 fastest growing buyer names are predominately millennial female names, and all of them peak in the 1980s and 1990s.   Overall, Hannah, Austin, Alexis, Logan, and Taylor -- of which three are predominantly female names -- were the top five fastest growing first names on home sales deeds in 2018, with their frequency seeing an average increase of 22 percent from 2017. While Michael, John, David, James, and Robert were still the top five first names on sale deeds by sheer volume, these names saw a 3 to 5 percent decline over 2017. "First names associated with women -- especially millennial women -- saw a significantly faster level of home sales growth in 2018, giving us a sneak peek of homeownership trends in 2019," said Javier Vivas, director of economics research at realtor.com®. "Hispanics and millennials names overall also saw a surge in home purchases last year. If these buyers can continue to break through the affordability barrier, they are likely to make up a larger share of owners than ever before and dominate the market for years to come." Millennials are NOT the rent generation In 2018, home sales with millennial names increased 5.3 percent, followed by Gen X names at 0.8 percent. Names of Boomers (born 1946 to 1964) and the Silent Generation (born before 1945) fell 2 percent and 3.5 percent, respectively. Geographically, millennial buyer names are particularly overrepresented in Kansas, Indiana, Louisiana, Missouri, and Utah - states where housing affordability remains above national levels - confirming that jobs and availability of entry level homes act as magnets for young buyers. The rise of Hispanic influence Deed data also shows a growth in Hispanic names. In 2018, home sales associated with traditionally Hispanic names and partially Hispanic names increased 4.1 percent and 3.7 percent, respectively year-over-year. While sales with non-Hispanic names remained virtually flat at 0.1 percent year-over-year. Notably, 26 of the top 100 fastest-growing names are traditionally of Hispanic origin. Within this category, Hispanic buyer names skew slightly older than their non-Hispanic counterparts, with a median birth year of 1979 and 1982 respectively. Geographically, Hispanic buyer names are naturally concentrated in the South and Southwest. California, Texas, Nevada, New Mexico, and Arizona are among the top states, unsurprising given their proximity to Central America. On the East Coast, sales to buyers with Hispanic names are overrepresented in Florida, Illinois, and New Jersey, where demand for homes from domestic and international buyers of South American and Caribbean origin tends to be concentrated. About realtor.com® Realtor.com®, The Home of Home Search℠, offers an extensive inventory of for-sale and rental listings, and access to information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. It pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today is the trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers by making all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [NASDAQ: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com®.
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Potential Home Buyers Lose Interest as Showing Activity Drops Broadly with Consecutive Monthly Declines; Trend Likely to Continue into 2019
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Redfin Predicts 2019 Housing Market Will Be the Coolest in Years
Among seven predictions for the new year, Redfin forecasts that the homeownership rate will rise SEATTLE, Dec. 19, 2018 -- Redfin today released its seven predictions for the housing market in 2019. "We predict that the housing market will continue to cool into the first half of 2019," said Redfin chief economist Daryl Fairweather, who authored today's report. "Inventory will rise back up to 2017 levels, and price growth, while likely still positive, will be the lowest we've seen since 2014 or possibly even 2011. Investors and house-flippers will back away from the cooling market, and real estate companies that buy homes from consumers to quickly sell at a profit (including our own RedfinNow) will face their first serious test. Tech companies and local governments will continue to go head to head on local housing issues." Redfin's Predictions for 2019: The housing market will continue to cool. Redfin's forecasts have price growth settling around 3 percent in the first half of the new year, down from 7 percent in the first half of 2018, but there is a real chance prices will fall below 2018 levels. A still-growing economy and increased access to credit will support more homebuyer demand, but higher interest rates will make home-buying more expensive, so it's hard to say whether home sales will stay down or rebound next year. The homeownership rate will continue to rise. Homebuyers will enjoy more inventory and less competition from speculators and house-flippers, which will lead to more people enjoying the benefits of homeownership. Homeownership has been consistently growing from its post-recession valley of 63 percent in 2016 to above 64 percent this year. We predict the homeownership rate will grow more rapidly in 2019. It will cost more to borrow, but more people will have access to credit for home-buying. A mortgage-rate increase to 5.5 percent by the end of 2019 from the sub-5 percent level where rates have been hovering in recent months would mean about a $100 increase in monthly mortgage payments on a $300,000 home. Lenders will also feel the effects of rising rates, which will increase their costs of lending and dampen demand for their services. This will motivate lenders to expand their customer base to low-income borrowers and first-time homebuyers. But of course, lenders will charge more for these loans--both to cover the risk of lending to borrowers with less-than-perfect credit and to cover their own costs of borrowing. A cooling housing market will dampen economic growth only slightly. In 2019, the economy will most likely grow, but a cooler housing market will contribute less to the overall economy. Even if residential investment (which includes money spent on construction, renovations, and real estate commissions) were to fall by 10 percent, total economic activity would be impacted by 1 to 2 percent. That isn't enough to cause a recession as long as the rest of the economy keeps growing. Fewer homes will be built, but more builders will focus on starter homes. In 2019, homebuilders will be more cautious about building during a cooling market and focus on building starter homes that are easier to sell than luxury homes. The per-unit value of single-family residential building permits has already flattened, and we predict per-unit values of building permits will decline in 2019. Another factor in 2019 will be low unemployment, which will finally cause wages to rise for low-income workers. This will impact both the supply of and demand for housing. On the supply side, higher labor costs will limit the number of homes built. Meanwhile, higher wages will be a boon to demand for starter-homes among working-class Americans. Institutional buying will face its first serious test. If home-buying demand falters due to higher interest rates and stock-market volatility, institutional buyers who made money from nearly every sale in a rising market with low interest rates could start to face losses, or may demonstrate more discipline than other housing investors. If i-buying works in a bear market as well as it has in a bull market, instant offers could become a major, permanent sector within the real estate economy. If it doesn't, a lot of money is going to sink into the sand. Tech and local government will go head-to-head on housing. Cities have been struggling with the double-edged sword of tech-company-driven prosperity and inequality. Growing cities will have to start building more housing now if they don't want to face the affordability and homelessness problems that established tech hubs like Seattle and San Francisco are currently facing. To read the full report, complete with data, charts and additional insights, please click here. The predictions above and in the linked blog post reflect the beliefs of Redfin's economics team about the overall housing market. They are not intended as historical information or future guidance to the investment community and shouldn't be relied on for those purposes. About Redfin Redfin is the next-generation real estate brokerage, combining its own full-service agents with modern technology to redefine real estate in the consumer's favor. Founded by software engineers, Redfin has the country's #1 brokerage website and offers a host of online tools to consumers, including the Redfin Estimate, the automated home-value estimate with the industry's lowest published error rate for listed homes. Homebuyers and sellers enjoy a full-service, technology-powered experience from Redfin real estate agents, while saving thousands in commissions. Redfin serves more than 80 major metro areas across the U.S. The company has closed more than $60 billion in home sales.
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U.S. Home Affordability Drops to More Than 10-Year Low in Q4 2018
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Leading iBuyers Selling Nearly One in 10 Homes to Institutional Investors According to New ATTOM Data Solutions Analysis
Top Three Buying Entities Related to Companies Purchasing Single Family Homes as Rentals IRVINE, Calif. — Nov. 29, 2018 — ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database, today released an analysis that shows that nearly one in 10 homes sold so far in 2018 by the nation's two leading iBuyers — Opendoor and Offerpad — were purchased by institutional investor entities buying at least 10 homes. According to the analysis, a total of 743 homes sold by the two iBuyers — companies that buy directly from homeowners via all-cash offers — were purchased by institutional investors so far in 2018, representing 9.6 percent of all sales by those two iBuyers combined. That is up from 293 institutional investor purchases representing 6.6 percent of the iBuyer sales in 2017, and 65 institutional investor purchases representing 3.9 percent of the iBuyer sales in 2016. "Tight inventory is a common challenge facing both individual and institutional single family rental investors across the country," said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president with ATTOM Data Solutions. "Meanwhile the appetite for more SFR inventory continues to grow as a new wave of institutional capital builds. Industry innovators are rising to meet this challenge through a variety of inventory-inducing channels, including off-market, build-to-rent, and iBuyer initiatives." Top Three Buying Entities The top three institutional buying entities — CERBERUS SFR HOLDINGS LP, CSH PROPERTY ONE LLC, and TAH HOLDING LP — all appear to be related to companies purchasing single family homes as rentals. These institutional investors may be turning to iBuyers as a source of inventory even as other sources of inventory such as foreclosures have largely dried up in recent years. Institutional investor purchases represented just 2.3 percent of all U.S. home sales so far in 2018, down from 2.9 percent in 2017 and down from a peak of 7.4 percent in 2012, according to the ATTOM analysis. "There are a lot of buyers, both big and small, looking to grow their SFR portfolios and inventory is very tight. This is leading to creative ways to find new product — from build-to-rent programs, off-market inventory programs and iBuyer initiatives," said Kevin Ortner, CEO with Renters Warehouse, a company that manages more than 22,000 SFR properties in 42 states. "There are several firms positioning themselves to be able to help bring supply to meet the demands of investors, and I expect that will continue to grow. I'm also seeing investment in technology and data across the space allowing greater scale, efficiencies and insights." "A properly priced rental home today, there is almost limitless demand for it," said Gary Beasley, CEO and co-founder with Roofstock, an online marketplace for SFR properties that itself is working on ways to create SFR inventory for both retail buyers and institutional buyers. "We have to get creative about how to attract this inventory, and if it isn't available to create it." Methodology ATTOM Data Solutions analyzed public record sales deed data from its nationwide property data warehouse for sales by entities associated with Opendoor and Offerpad, broken down by purchase entity. Purchase entities that bought at least 10 homes from the two iBuyers combined were considered institutional investors. For overall home sales, ATTOM considered any entity buying 10 or more properties in a calendar year as an institutional buyer. About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, APIs, market trends, marketing lists, match & append and more.
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Tougher Road Ahead for Home Buyers and Sellers in 2019
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Redfin Report: These 8 Inland Housing Markets are Heating Up as the Coasts Cool
These affordable metro areas are seeing a growing share of homes selling quickly and for above-list price SEATTLE, Nov. 9, 2018 -- While expensive coastal markets like Seattle and San Jose are cooling off, some smaller, affordable inland metro areas are heating up, according to Redfin, the next-generation real estate brokerage. Wilmington, Delaware, Philadelphia and Atlanta lead the handful of metro areas where supply is shrinking, leaving more homes to go under contract within days, and for above-list price than a year ago. To identify the markets that are still heating up, Redfin ranked the top 25 metro areas with populations of at least 500,000 people according to three indicators of a competitive seller's market, based on data for the four weeks ending October 14, compared with the same period a year earlier: Declines in the number of homes for sale (inventory) Increases in the share of homes going under contract within two weeks of their market debut Increases in the share of homes selling for more than their list price Housing markets that are heating up the most Contrast the numbers above with markets like Seattle, San Jose and Portland, where inventory has been increasing by double digits, and the shares of homes going under contract quickly is shrinking. Homes in the metro areas that are heating up are also considerably less expensive than not only the hot coastal markets, but also than the national median price of about $300,000. Plus, except for Atlanta and Philadelphia, all of the heating-up metro areas are smaller, with populations under 2 million. Atlanta is also a top migration destination, moving up from #5 among long-distance Redfin.com user searches in the third quarter of 2017 to #2 in the third quarter this year. "Competition in Wilmington has become fierce and often buyers have to offer over asking and compete against three to six other offers," said local Redfin agent Claryssa McEnany. "I'm working with several buyers moving to the area from New Jersey who have expressed that they want to escape the higher property taxes that they can no longer fully deduct." Markets like Wilmington are still deep in seller's market territory, "Too many sellers are staying put!" according to McEnany. "Buyers are motivated and want to move now but there just aren't enough homes available." In the face of the inventory shortage that has been worsening since early 2016, some of McEnany's clients are choosing to expand their search area or make more compromises to get into a home. It's likely that even if the real estate slowdown becomes more widespread, these inexpensive markets will continue to show strength thanks to their big advantage in affordability. To read the full report, complete with additional data, please click here. About Redfin Redfin is the next-generation real estate brokerage, combining its own full-service agents with modern technology to redefine real estate in the consumer's favor. Founded by software engineers, Redfin has the country's #1 brokerage website and offers a host of online tools to consumers, including the Redfin Estimate, the automated home-value estimate with the industry's lowest published error rate for listed homes. Homebuyers and sellers enjoy a full-service, technology-powered experience from Redfin real estate agents, while saving thousands in commissions. Redfin serves more than 80 major metro areas across the U.S. The company has closed more than $60 billion in home sales.
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Affordability, Disruption and Rising Interest Rates Lead Top 10 Issues Facing Real Estate
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2019 Forecast: Existing-Home Sales to Stabilize and Price Growth to Continue
BOSTON (November 2, 2017) – Consumers should expect home sales to flatten and home prices to continue to increase, though at a slower pace, according to a residential housing and economic forecast session at NAR's 2018 REALTORS® Conference & Expo. As Lawrence Yun, chief economist at the National Association of Realtors®, presented his 2019 housing and economic forecast, he was joined onstage by Lisa Sturtevant, President of Lisa Sturtevant & Associates, LLC, who discussed the importance of affordable housing in the U.S. Much of Yun's presentation focused on recent declines in home sales, but in the context of long-term trends to illustrate the housing market's actual performance. "Ninety percent of markets are experiencing price gains while very few are experiencing consistent price declines," said Yun. "2017 was the best year for home sales in ten years, and 2018 is only down 1.5 percent year to date. Statistically, it is a mild twinge in the data and a very mild adjustment compared to the long-term growth we've been experiencing over the past few years." As to the possibility that we are currently experiencing a small bubble, Yun was quick to shut down any speculation. "The current market conditions are fundamentally different than what we were experiencing before the recession 10 years ago," said Yun. "Most states are reporting stable or strong market conditions, housing starts are under-producing instead of over-producing and we are seeing historically low foreclosure levels, indicating that people are living within their means and not purchasing homes they cannot afford. This is a stronger, more stable market compared to the loosely regulated market leading up to the bust." Housing affordability was also discussed by both panelists. While the U.S. is experiencing historically normal levels of affordability, potential buyers may be staying out of the market because of perceived problems with affordability. "NAR research shows that a lower percentage of consumers think that now is a good time to buy, while more are indicating that it is a good time to sell," said Yun. "Problems could arise if the market is flooded with too many sellers and not enough buyers. Fortunately, that does not appear to be the case, as indicated by months' supply of inventory at below five months." Sturtevant discussed the importance of homeownership on a social level - how homeowners tend to be in better physical and mental health and have greater opportunity for economic self-sufficiency. Additionally, communities with more homeowners tend to be more economically prosperous and better able to attract and retain workers. "I am a researcher, not an advocate; but the results of my research have compelled me to see the importance of affordable, stable housing, and the positive economic impact to local communities," said Sturtevant. Looking to next year, Yun shared his forecast for home sales and median home prices. "The forecast for home sales will be very boring - meaning stable," said Yun. With a few months of data remaining in 2018, Yun estimates that existing-home sales will finish at a pace of 5.345 million—a decrease from 2017 (5.51 million). In 2019, sales are forecasted to increase to 5.4 million, a 1 percent increase. The national median existing-home price is expected to rise to around $266,800 in 2019 (up 3.1 percent from 2018 this year and $274,000 in 2020. "Home price appreciation will slow down - the days of easy price gains are coming to an end - but prices will continue to rise." All of these forecasts, however, are dependent on higher levels of home production. "All indications are that we have a housing shortage. If you look at population growth and job growth, it is clear that we are not producing enough houses. This is often a local issue, not a national one, so NAR has created a website where local associations and Realtors® can go for information on how to advocate for increased supply in their communities," Said Yun. Commenting on the overall health of the U.S. economy, Yun noted that the economy is "good." He noted that we have low unemployment, record high job openings, historically low jobless claims, job additions for eight straight years and wages beginning to increase. "This type of activity in the economy should support the housing market, even as interest rates rise," said Yun. The National Association of Realtors® is America's largest trade association, representing 1.3 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.
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Zealous Gen Z: Saving Early to Be Homeowners by Age 25
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Automated Cars, Micro-Mobility to Impact the Future of Transportation, Say Realtors
BOSTON (November 4, 2018) — Industry experts and researchers discussed the future of mobility and its impact on real estate during the Emerging Business & Technology Forum at the 2018 REALTORS® Conference & Expo in Boston. "It is important to think not just about what is here now, but looking at what is coming five to 10 years from now," said Chad Curry, director of Center for REALTORS® Technology at the National Association of Realtors®. "Many things are coming that are going to reshape our industry and reshape the land that we hold so dear." Automobiles have shaped the way we build cities, roads and houses. The rise of the automobile led to the rise of suburbs and a commuting population. However, by the year 2030 it is predicted 70 percent of the world's population will live in urban environments. But what does that mean for cars and how we move people going forward? "In the 1990's, 95 percent of 16 year-olds had a driver's license. Today, that number is just 76 percent," said Curry. "Today's youth are already finding new ways to move around that don't involve a privately owned vehicle." While ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft are responsible for a large percentage of alternative transport, micro-mobility, such as bike and scooter shares, are beginning to rise in popularity. LimeBike, a scooter and bike share company, has been valued at $1 billion and is currently deployed in 65 cities. The increase in micro-mobility has encouraged cities to create multimodal roads that accommodate cars, buses, bikes, scooters and pedestrians. Panelists also discussed the rise of driverless cars. Legislation regarding driverless cars is currently being crafted or debated in a majority of U.S. states, meaning this new technology could soon have a genuine impact on our nation's mobility. "Automated cars won't simply help alleviate traffic, but will also make roads safer," said Benjamin Lewis, a panelist and innovation manager and future of mobility expert for Liberty Mutual Insurance. "The overwhelming number of crashes, 94 percent, are attributed to human error. A reduction in human error will lead to fewer accidents, deaths and injuries. Drunk, distracted and tired driving will be a thing of the past." Cars are currently designed with one person in mind – the driver. The driver needs to be able to see the road ahead and behind them, they need to be able to steer and reach the break and gas pedals. However, that design could change with the driverless revolution. "Cars could be designed to be used as mass transit in the morning and moving lounges in the evening," said Curry. "They could be turned into small mobile offices – are we looking at the real estate office of the future?" The National Association of Realtors® is America's largest trade association, representing more than 1.3 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.
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The Longest Housing Inventory Decline in History Comes to an End
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20% of Recent Homebuyers Made an Offer Sight-Unseen, Down from 35% Late Last Year
Survey Findings Suggest that Buyers Are Under Less Pressure to Make Hasty Bids as Competition Eases SEATTLE, Oct. 15, 2018 -- One in five recent homebuyers said they made an offer sight-unseen, according to Redfin, the next-generation real estate brokerage. This statistic was discovered from a Redfin-commissioned survey in May of 1,463 people across 14 major markets who had bought a home in the last year. That's down from 35 percent in a similar survey conducted in November, when the share of buyers making sight-unseen offers had been growing consistently for at least a year and a half. When Redfin analysts first noticed in May that the prevalence of sight-unseen offers had returned to 2016 levels, they struggled to pinpoint a clear explanation. At that time, the market was breaking records for price growth, competition and home-selling speeds. Buyers felt pressured to move incredibly quickly to secure the most desirable homes, which were off the market in a matter of days. Making an offer without seeing the home first in person had become an advantageous strategy for buyers in inventory-strapped markets like Denver or Seattle. In July, Redfin first reported that the market was beginning to shift toward buyers' favor, with rising inventory and slowing price growth. Buyers had become more choosy about what homes to move on and were behaving less hasty in making offers. And now, buyers are facing fewer multiple-offer situations, which allows buyers even more time to visit homes in person before making an offer. Redfin analysts now believe that the declining prevalence of sight-unseen offers was likely an early indicator of this changing market. Redfin intends to watch this trend closely and plans to survey homebuyers again this fall to see if the prevalence of sight-unseen offers continues to change. "Now that most homes are staying on the market for longer than a week, there just isn't as much pressure for buyers to make offers so hastily," said Jessie Culbert, a Redfin agent in Seattle. "That's a big change from earlier this year when sellers set offer review deadlines, and they were strict! This meant that whether or not you had time to physically step inside the home, you had to get your offer in on time in order to be considered. Otherwise you would miss out entirely on the opportunity to compete for it." It's also worth pointing out that one in five homebuyers making offers sight unseen is still a lot, and we believe this is a reflection of the fact that technology has made it easier to learn about a home from anywhere with internet access. For example, using Redfin 3D Walkthrough, a buyer can tour a home virtually on their computer or smartphone, seeing the walls, appliances and nooks and crannies from every angle. Additionally, Redfin agents use tools like FaceTime, Skype or YouTube to show homes to customers who aren't able to join them for an in-person tour. This technology is especially useful to homebuyers moving to a new city, who would have to drive for hours or take a flight to see a home. Over time, as technologies continue to advance and people become more comfortable relying on them to make big financial decisions, we expect sight-unseen offers to become more commonplace, even throughout fluctuations in supply and demand. To read the full report, complete with historical survey and methodology, click here. About Redfin Redfin is the next-generation real estate brokerage, combining its own full-service agents with modern technology to redefine real estate in the consumer's favor. Founded by software engineers, Redfin has the country's #1 brokerage website and offers a host of online tools to consumers, including the Redfin Estimate, the automated home-value estimate with the industry's lowest published error rate for listed homes. Homebuyers and sellers enjoy a full-service, technology-powered experience from Redfin real estate agents, while saving thousands in commissions. Redfin serves more than 80 major metro areas across the U.S. The company has closed more than $60 billion in home sales.
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National Housing Inventory Crisis Reaches Inflection Point
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Millennial Homebuyers Are Driving Realtor.com's 2018 Hottest ZIP Codes in America Report
Kentwood, Mich. leads the list for the first time, while Rochester, N.Y. and Worthington, Ohio get a bump in demand SANTA CLARA, Calif., Sept. 26, 2018 -- Realtor.com®, the Home of Home Search℠, today announced its fourth annual list of the Hottest ZIP Codes in America. The new list shows high-income millennials are helping to drive a nearly 10 percent increase in how fast homes are sold in the most popular areas of the country, which spans emerging suburban areas near Silicon Valley, throughout the Midwest, and on the East Coast. As millennials get older, move out on their own and buy homes, they are driving demand for homes in smaller, more suburban locales. Some of the new areas making this year's list include: No 1. Kentwood, Mich. (49508); No. 5 Peabody, Mass. (01960); No. 6 Boise, Idaho (83704); No. 9 Rochester, N.Y. (14624); and No. 10 Upper Montclair, N.J. (07043). Back by popular demand, the following areas are among the ZIP codes returning to the list this year: Colorado Springs, Colo. (80922) moved to No. 2 from No. 7 in 2017; Watauga, Texas (76148) moved to No. 3 from No. 1 in 2017 and 2016; Castro Valley, Calif. (94546) moved to No. 4 from No. 6 in 2017; Worthington, Ohio (43085) moved to No. 7 from No. 2 in 2015; and Overland Park, Kan. (66210) was ranked No. 8 this year and in 2017. "When it comes to choosing a home of their own, millennials are looking for opportunity and they're finding it in affordable suburbs," said Danielle Hale, chief economist for realtor.com®. "These hot housing markets are attracting the attention of hard-working, high-earning 25-to-34-year-olds who are drawn by their relative affordability, strong local economies, and outdoor and cultural amenities." Realtor.com®'s 2018 Top 10 Hottest ZIP Codes Realtor.com® analyzed 32,000 ZIP codes based on the time it takes properties to sell and how frequently homes are viewed in each ZIP code on realtor.com®. One ZIP code was included per metro area. How hot are these ZIP codes? Homes in this year's top 10 hottest markets sell in an average of 20 days, 46 days faster than the rest of the country, 25 days faster than their respective metro areas, and 18 days faster than their respective counties. Realtor.com® users view homes in these markets four times more often than homes in the rest of the country, 2.3 times more often than their respective metro areas, and 1.9 times more often than their respective counties. The average views per property for these 10 ZIPs on realtor.com® are up 14 percent compared to last year. In addition, home list prices in nine of the 10 markets are appreciating on a yearly basis, and in some cases they're doing so rapidly. Five of the 10 ZIPs saw double-digit growth in asking prices — faster than the national rate of 8.4 percent. What's making these ZIP codes hot this year?: Homes are relatively affordable. The median price for a home in these markets is $358,000, and top markets are almost all more affordable than their surrounding area -- only 43085 (Worthington, Ohio) and 07043 (Upper Montclair, N.J.) are exceptions. In addition, five of the top 10 ZIPs have median listing prices that are lower than the U.S. overall and eight have prices that are lower than their respective metro and county areas. Residents are employed at higher rates and tend to earn more. Household incomes in eight of the top 10 ZIPs are greater than the national median of $61,000. In total, the average household income in the top 10 ZIPs is $83,000, 1.4 times the national rate. In addition, the 10 ZIP codes are located in counties with an average unemployment rate of 3.6 percent, which is 30 basis points lower than the U.S. unemployment rate of 3.9 percent. A total of 83,000 jobs will be created this year in these markets combined*, which indicates a growth rate of 2.2 percent, significantly above the national growth rate of 1.8 percent. Millennials, in particular, are doing well. In eight out of the top 10 ZIPs, the median household income for 25 to 34 year olds is 1.3 times higher than the national median, $78,000 versus $60,000, respectively. Millennials hold the lion share of purchases. Mortgage originations in nine of the top 10 counties of these top 10 ZIPs are strongly dominated by millennials (25 to 34 year olds), which have a greater share of mortgage originations (34 percent) than the next largest group (35 to 44 year olds) with 31 percent. Buyers have their credit buttoned up. The homebuyers in the counties where these ZIPs are located have an average FICO score of 729, higher than the national average of 720. Market Highlights – Top 10 ZIP Codes 1. 49508 – Kentwood, Mich. – Although neighboring ZIP code 49548 was ranked No. 3 on the list last year, this is 49508's first appearance. Located just 15 miles southeast of Grand Rapids and 30 miles from beautiful Lake Michigan, is the quiet suburban town of Kentwood. The area is known for its tree lined streets, close knit community, affordable homes, and quick commute to Grand Rapids, where Spectrum Health, Meijer, and Mercy General Health Partners are the major employers. Young families are drawn to this affordable neighborhood because of its strong schools, such as Discovery Elementary, which has GreatSchools rating of 8/10. Key housing stats: Average home listing views in ZIP 49508 are up 4 percent over last year, with homes receiving nearly four times more views than those in the rest of the country. Homes in Kentwood sell in 14 days, 52 days faster than the rest of the U.S., with a median list price of $193,168, up 9.5 percent over last year. A pocket of relative affordability, prices in 49508 are 33 percent lower than the surrounding county. Kent County is expected to add 8,000 jobs this year, an increase of 2.3 percent. 2. 80922 – Colorado Springs, Colo. – Located 60 miles south of Denver on the eastern side of the Rocky Mountains, lies the thriving outdoor centric city of Colorado Springs. This area draws a diverse nature-loving crowd with its affordable housing compared to its sister-city to the north, Denver. Colorado Springs is replete with local breweries and tasting rooms such as the Goat Patch Brewing Co. and Trail's End self-pouring taproom, as well as many boutique restaurants that cater to the area's popular healthy living lifestyle. With areas such as Garden of the Gods and Pike's Peak, there are always trails and parks to get outside and explore. Major employers in the area include the United States Air Force at its Academy and other area bases, as well as UC Memorial Hospital North. Housing stats: The number of households in this ZIP grew by 21 percent from 2010 to 2018, with a home ownership rate of 80 percent among all age groups and 68 percent among millennials. Reflecting the high concentration of military service members in the area, 40 percent of new mortgages in El Paso County are guaranteed by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Homes in 80922 sell in 15 days, about 19 days faster than the rest of El Paso County, with a median list price of $297,811, up 9.7 percent over last year. El Paso County is expected to add 8,300 jobs this year, an increase of 2.6 percent. 3. 76148 Watauga, Texas – Located just 10 miles up on the northern edge of Fort Worth is the family-friendly suburb of Watauga. This area caters to young families that want easy access to all the amenities and entertainment that Fort Worth has to offer, while giving budget-savvy buyers the most bang for their buck. Younger families are also drawn to Watauga for its strong schools, such as Grace E. Hardeman Elementary, which has a GreatSchools rating of 8/10. This ZIP also ranks highest in the state in the Human Rights Campaign's Municipal Equality Index (MEI), which scores the ways cities support the LGBT people who live and work there. Major employers in the area include American Airlines, Texas Health Resources, and Lockheed Martin Aeronautics company. Housing stats: The dominant buyer segment in Watauga is millennials, who hold 33 percent of new purchase mortgages in the ZIP and have an 65 percent home ownership rate, compared to 42 percent in Tarrant County. Millennials in 76148 also earn slightly more than the median household overall. Homes in Watauga sell in 15 days, 3 percent faster than last year, with a median list price of $183,576, up 16.2 percent over last year. Tarrant County is expected to add 28,400 jobs this year, an increase of 2.8 percent. 4. 94546 Castro Valley, Calif. – Situated 15 miles south of Oakland is the East Bay neighborhood of Castro Valley. This quiet neighborhood is known for its relative affordability with homes costing 5 percent less than the rest of the county and 17 percent less than the broader metro area. It is also known for its excellent school system, such as Proctor Elementary, which has a GreatSchools rating of 9/10. The relaxed area caters to young professionals working in San Francisco, Oakland, and Berkeley because of its BART (Bay Area Rapid Transport) access. Castro Valley exudes local pride with activities such as the Fall Festival in September, Barks & Boos around Halloween, Light Parade in November, and Castro Valley Street Eats with food trucks from spring to autumn. Housing stats: Millennials make up 38 percent of the new purchase mortgage share in ZIP 94546, while the dominant buyer group skews slightly older at 35-44 years of age. Homes in Castro Valley sell in just 16 days, about 50 days faster than the rest of the country. Listings in this ZIP have a median list price of $784,238, up 7.6 percent over last year. While this is notably above the U.S. median of $287,036, it is significantly more affordable than nearby San Francisco priced at $944,000 (up 7.3 percent) and Silicon Valley at $1.2 million (up 25.9 percent). While Alameda County is expected to add only 3,700 jobs this year, an increase of 0.5 percent, the unemployment rate of 3.0 percent is well below the U.S. level of 3.9 percent. 5. 01960 Peabody, Mass. – Located just inland of Salem and 15 miles northeast of Boston, this small but vibrant community is known for its rich industrial history. Peabody features great public schools, such as John E. McCarthy School which has a GreatSchools rating of 8/10, and Brooksby Farm – a 200-acre working farm. The area is also headquarters to Analogic Corporation and Tradewin Consulting Services, which are some of the largest employers in Peabody. Housing stats: The dominant buyer segment in ZIP 01960 is 35-44-year-olds, while millennials (25-34-years-old) hold 32 percent of recently purchased mortgages in the area. With a median household income of $73,312, millennials in 01960 have a higher income than the typical household. Homes in Peabody sell in 20 days, 46 days more quickly than the rest of the country, with a median list price of $424,685, up 8.4 percent compared to last year. Essex County is expected to add 9,000 jobs this year, an increase of 2.2 percent. 6. 83704 Boise, Idaho – Boise is a vibrant, active city, with a mild four-season climate that allows residents to enjoy the local mountains, rivers, and lakes year-round. Plus, the Snake River Valley allows for a rich soil that provides distinctive, award-winning vintage wines from local vineyards, while the local brewery scene has been growing. Boise was also just named one of Money Magazine's Best Places to Live. Ada County ranks among the top five most popular markets for Bay Area Californians searching for homes out-of-state. As more Californians are moving away from San Francisco, Silicon Valley, and California's wine country, many are seeking homes in Idaho where the sunny climate and local tech employers, such as Micron Technology, are strong attractors. Housing stats: Millennials make up 27 percent of the new mortgage share in Ada County, while the dominant buyer group skews slightly older at 35-44 years of age. Homes in 83704 sell in 23 days, about 43 days faster than the rest of the country. Listings this year have a median list price of $251,324, up 16.2 percent over last year. Ada County is expected to add 6,400 jobs this year, an increase of about 2.8 percent, which is extraordinary considering the already low unemployment rate of 2.5 percent. 7. 43085 Worthington, Ohio – Nestled between two highways 12 miles directly north of Columbus, sits the close-knit community of Worthington. The area attracts young and growing families that want homes in a quiet neighborhood without giving up their access to downtown Columbus, Ohio. Being so close to The Ohio State University, Worthington is an affluent neighborhood, known for its particularly strong schools, such as Evening Street Elementary and Phoenix Middle School, both of which have a GreatSchools rating of 9/10. Additionally, the area has a strong sense of community with its Farmers Market, Craft Arts Crawl, as well as its many dining and boutique shopping options. Housing stats: The number of households in this ZIP grew by 9 percent from 2010 to 2018, with an above-average home ownership rate of 74 percent among all age groups and 52 percent among millennials. Homes in Worthington sell in 25 days, about 11 days faster than the rest of the county and 41 days faster than the U.S., with a median list price of $291,305, up 0.8 percent over last year. Franklin County is expected to add 13,500 jobs this year, an increase of 2 percent. 8. 66210 Overland Park, Kan. – Sitting just 11 miles south of Kansas City on the Kansas side of the border, is the thriving neighborhood of Overland Park. Though it is a suburb of Kansas City, it is also the second most populous city in the state. The area boasts a plethora of outdoor options including the Overland Park Arboretum and Botanical Gardens, as well as many hiking trails. Overland Park was just named one of Money Magazine's Best Places to Live. The area is great for both young and growing families as it offers affordable homes, 34 percent less expensive than Johnson County, Kansas as a whole. Overland Park is also home to an excellent school system that includes Harmony Middle School and Lakewood Elementary School, both of which have a GreatSchools rating of 10/10. Housing stats: Millennials continue to be the dominant buying group in the area, holding 36 percent of recently purchased mortgages in Johnson County and high-credit buyers are the norm with an average FICO of 737 compared with 720 for the U.S. as a whole. Homes in Overland Park sell in 24 days, one day slower than last year but still 42 days faster than the U.S., with a median list price of $261,927, up 14 percent over last year. While Johnson County is expected to add just 3,600 jobs this year, an increase of 1.1 percent, this is notable given the low 2.9 percent unemployment rate. 9. 14624 Rochester, N.Y. – Sitting on the southern shore of Lake Ontario is the diverse community of Rochester. The area is a close-knit community known for its plethora of beautiful parks and water features, and has been nicknamed "Flower City USA" because of the many lilacs throughout its parks. Rochester's workforce, which was previously known for its print and film services because of Kodak's former headquarters, has shifted toward health systems and higher education, with Strong Memorial Hospital and the University of Rochester being two of the area's largest employers. Along with the revitalization of downtown, the area has seen an influx in millennial home buyers purchasing in the Rochester downtown area and surrounding suburbs over the recent years. Housing stats: Homes in this ZIP are relatively affordable, priced 28 and 27 percent less than the county and metro, respectively, which have kept buyer interest high and growing. Home listing views for this ZIP have increased 51 percent over last year. Household incomes in 14624 are higher than typical U.S. incomes and homes are priced 54 percent below the typical U.S. listing, creating a great opportunity for buyers. This explains the high home ownership rates – 80 percent for all households and 64 percent for millennial households. Millennials make up the largest share of recently purchased mortgages in Monroe County at 33 percent. Homes typically sell within 22 days in this ZIP, about 29 percent faster than last year and 44 days faster than the U.S., with a median list price of $131,964. Housing interest in this ZIP has remained strong despite a roughly average growth in jobs of 0.6 percent over last year. 10. 07043 Upper Montclair, N.J. – Sitting about 14 miles west of the Hudson River and nestled at the foot of the First Watchung Mountain, is the vibrant community of Upper Montclair. The area caters to those looking to raise a family in a quiet neighborhood, while still having easy commutes to New York City and Newark, N.J. The area is a small, wealthy township where the median income of $176,182, is nearly triple the U.S. median income of $61,045. This thriving arts community is also home to the Montclair Art Museum, Montclair State University, global cuisine, and a funky downtown. Housing stats: Homes in ZIP 07043 sell in 22 days, about 23 percent faster than last year, with a median list price of $762,350, up 6 percent over last year. Homeownership rates in this ZIP are high for all households (83 percent) and millennials (51 percent). The dominant buyer segment in Essex County skews slightly older (35-44 year olds), while millennials hold 31 percent of new purchase mortgages. Recent job growth in the local area has been limited at 0.1 percent, but the labor market is powered by its larger neighbors -- New York and Newark, N.J. *Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS); Moody's Analytics Forecasted Realtor.com's 2018 Top 50 Hottest ZIP codes For more information about the list, please visit: https://www.realtor.com/research/hottest-zip-codes-2018/. To watch a video about realtor.com's hottest markets index, click here. About realtor.com® Realtor.com®, The Home of Home Search℠, offers an extensive inventory of for-sale and rental listings, and access to information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. It pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today is the trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers by making all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com®.
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Realtors View Technology as Increasingly Valuable for Business, Competition
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Home Price Cuts Increase, but Still Not Buyer's Market
SANTA CLARA, Calif., Aug. 29, 2018 -- Realtor.com® today announced the findings of its August housing trend report which revealed a surge in price cuts and the second largest drop in the U.S. median list price in three years. Although competition between buyers remained stiff and list prices continue to rise, the report also revealed a slowdown in price growth and easing of inventory declines. "Buyers, exhausted by bidding wars and little choice in inventory, could finally catch a break," said Danielle Hale, chief economist for realtor.com®. "An increase in price cuts suggests that sellers are starting to become more flexible, especially in pricey markets. However, affordability is a concern in most areas which continue to be sellers' markets. Fierce competition and low inventory continue to push up prices. While buyers are gaining leverage in some markets, we are still far from a true 'buyer's market.'" The median listing price in the U.S. decreased by $4,000 in August, dropping to $295,000 from a record-high of $299,000 in July. This is the second largest monthly list price drop since August 2015. While prices are still 7 percent higher than they were one year ago, the year-over-year increase is smaller than the 10 percent year-over-year gain seen last August. The deceleration in price growth was also observed in the larger markets. The average yearly growth in median list prices in the largest 45 markets combined was 6 percent, down from 8 percent this time last year. Meanwhile, price cuts are on the rise, especially in pricey markets where inventory is rising. The proportion of listings that feature price cuts rose 1.5 percentage points in the last year to 19.1 percent in August. The share of price cuts among listings is now 1.5 times more prevalent than in August 2012 when 13 percent of listings featured price discounts. This upward movement was more pronounced in major metropolitan areas in the last year including: Seattle with an 8 percent increase in cuts; San Jose with a 7 percent increase; and a 5 percent increase in San Diego, Riverside, Indianapolis and Los Angeles. In fact, 39 of the 45 largest markets saw an increase in the share of price cuts over last year. As predicted in the realtor.com® 2018 housing forecast, the rate of inventory decline slowed, with only 2 percent fewer for-sale listings on the market than there were in August 2017. Inventory increased 2 percent over July, in line with the typical seasonal increase. The trend continues to gain strength as the last week of August saw the first year-over-year increase in inventory in four years. Approximately 488,000 new listings entered the market during August. San Jose, Seattle and San Diego were the three markets with the biggest inventory jumps over last year, all posting increases of 28 percent or more. Price Gains and Price Cuts in Largest 45 U.S. Metros* * Excluded: Denver, Columbus, Las Vegas due to MLS feed changes during the period analyzed. Realtor.com® tracks national housing trends as well as data for the 500 largest U.S. metros. For August trend data, please visit: https://realtor.com/research/data. About realtor.com® Realtor.com®, The Home of Home Search℠, offers an extensive inventory of for-sale and rental listings, and access to the information, tools and professional expertise to help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. It pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today is the trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers by making all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com®.
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Housing Inventory Up In High-Priced Markets
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Home Buyers Forego Garages for School Districts
SANTA CLARA, Calif., July 24, 2018 -- Today's seller's market is forcing buyers to make compromises, but new survey data from realtor.com®, The Home of Home Search, shows buyers remain steadfast in their desire for their preferred school districts. In fact, they are willing to give up two of their most desired home features -- a garage and updated kitchen -- to get into the school district they want. "Most buyers understand that they may not be able to find a home that covers every single item on their wish list," said Danielle Hale, chief economist for realtor.com®. "But our survey shows that school districts are an area where many buyers aren't willing to compromise. For many buyers, 'location, location, location,' means 'schools, schools, schools.'"   The online survey was conducted earlier this month by Harris Research of more than 1,000 people who closed on a home in 2018. Three-quarters of respondents indicated schools were important in their search The majority of successful buyers surveyed, 73 percent, indicated school boundaries were important to their search, with 39 percent indicating very important and 34 percent important. Only 18 percent said they were unimportant or very unimportant, and 9 percent of buyers were neutral on the question. The desire for particular schools varied significantly by life stage and age. Ninety-one percent of buyers with children said that school boundaries were important or very important, compared to 34 percent of those without children. Similarly, younger buyers were more likely to say that schools were important. Eighty-four percent of those 35-54 years old and 86 percent of those 18-34 years old indicated they were important, compared to 37 percent of buyers 55-plus. More than half of older buyers 55-plus said school boundaries were unimportant or very unimportant. Buyers compromise on their top home features for good schools Seventy-eight percent of buyers for whom schools were important and who were able to get into their preferred district said they had to compromise on home features; 22 percent did not. The features they most commonly reported giving up were a garage (19 percent), a large backyard (18 percent), an updated kitchen (17 percent), desired number of bedrooms (17 percent), and an outdoor living area (16 percent). According to realtor.com's spring home buyer survey a garage was the No. 1 feature home buyers were looking for this year, followed by an updated kitchen, and an open floor plan. Older buyers were less likely to say they had to compromise with 42 percent of buyers 55-plus reporting they made no compromises, compared to 21 percent of 35-54 year-old buyers and 17 percent of buyers aged 18-34. Buyers define good schools by test scores and accelerated programs Test scores were the factor most often selected by buyers as a hallmark of a good school (59 percent), followed by having accelerated programs (53 percent), arts and music (49 percent), diversity (43 percent), and before- and after-school programs (41 percent). Younger buyers were more likely than older buyers to cite diversity as a factor that makes for a good school -- 49 percent for 18-34 year-olds, compared to 37 percent for 55-plus. More older buyers placed importance on whether a school has accelerated programs -- 62 percent for 55-plus vs. 50 percent for buyers under 55. Buyers looking for homes in a specific district or school boundary, can search specifically within these parameters on realtor.com.® Buyers simply enter the name of a school or district into the search box on the realtor.com® home page. Homes within the area are then presented on a map with a "pin" showing the school name and location. For more information about the survey, please visit: https://www.realtor.com/research/home-buyers-forego-garages-for-school-districts About realtor.com® Realtor.com®, The Home of Home SearchSM, offers the most comprehensive source of for-sale MLS-listed properties, among competing national sites, and access to information, tools and professional expertise to help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. It pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today is the trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers by making all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [NASDAQ: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com®.
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Who's Closing on a Home in the Most Competitive Market of All-Time?
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[Infographic] Housing Market Movers: Baby Boomers
In recent years, baby boomers have been active in the housing market, coming in at a close second to millennials as the largest generation of home buyers, while home prices have remained high and inventory conditions tightened. The National Association of Realtors®' 2018 Profile of Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends identified that baby boomers are now more likely to buy homes not just for themselves—but also for their aging parents and adult kids saddled with student debt. As baby boomers continue to grow in the market, here is how they compare to other generations of buyers: Second largest generation of buyers (after millennials): 32 percent Most likely to buy a new home: 20 percent Bought a single-family home: 81 percent Most likely to move to another region: 18 percent Obtained a conventional mortgage loan: 66 percent The National Association of Realtors® is America's largest trade association, representing 1.3 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.
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Foreign Investment in U.S. Commercial Real Estate Remains Strong, China and Mexico Top Investors
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Housing Prices Hit New Highs, but Show Signs of Deceleration, Realtor.com May Housing Data Indicates
SANTA CLARA, Calif., May 30, 2018 -- U.S. home prices hit an all-time high of $297,000 and sold faster than ever before in May – in a mere 55 days – but the market also showed hints of slowed momentum, according to the realtor.com® May 2018 monthly housing trend report. Realtor.com® data showed inventory declined 6 percent year over year in May and increased 6 percent compared to April 2018. Median listing prices only grew 8 percent year over year for the third month in a row, down from 10 percent in February. Part of this deceleration can be attributed to 557,000 new listings hitting the market in May, the highest number since July 2015. According to Javier Vivas, director of economic research for realtor.com®: We're in the thick of the hottest home-buying season of all time. The pace of U.S. home sales has officially reached a seasonal and historical high, but we're also beginning to see slight signs of deceleration. As more and more new listings come onto the market, inventory declines are starting to lose momentum. On the surface, this offers a glimmer of hope to homebuyers and, if sustained, could plug the supply leak. However, total listing volume remains highly dependent on new construction, much of which is still out of the price range of first time buyers – the largest segment of buyers. Even as inventory recovers, the mix of what's available versus what shoppers are looking for could become an even more pronounced mismatch. Unfortunately for buyers, median list prices continue to show strong yearly growth and fail to hint that home values will stall any time soon. Offering the most comprehensive source of information for-sale MLS-listed properties, realtor.com®'s tracks national housing trends as well as data for the 500 largest U.S. metros. For May trend data on these markets as well other housing trend data, please visit: https://realtor.com/research/data About realtor.com® Realtor.com®, The Home of Home Search℠, offers the most comprehensive source of for-sale MLS-listed properties, among competing national sites, and access to the information, tools and professional expertise to help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. It pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today is the trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers by making all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [NASDAQ: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com.
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Redfin Migration Report: Denver Joins Seattle and San Francisco as a Tech Hub with More People Looking to Move Out than Move In
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Realtors Midyear Forecast: Home Sales, Prices to Rise Despite Inventory, Affordability Challenges
WASHINGTON (May 17, 2018) – A stronger economy, wage growth and an improving job market are expected to march home sales and prices higher in 2018, but low supply and weakening affordability will tamper the rate of increases, according to speakers at a residential real estate forum during the 2018 REALTORS® Legislative Meetings & Trade Expo. Lawrence Yun, chief economist of the National Association of Realtors®, presented his 2018 midyear forecast and said despite headwinds a moderate and multiyear increase in home sales is likely ahead. After accelerating 3.8 percent in 2016, existing home sales rose only 1.1 percent to 5.5 million in 2017 and are forecast to finish 2018 at a pace of around 5.6 million (up 1.8 percent). He projects 5.7 million sales for 2019. "Overall fundamentals remain solid, driven by a growing economy and steady job creation, which will sustain home sales in 2018 slightly above last year's pace," said Yun. "The worsening housing shortage means home prices are primed to rise further this year too, hindering affordability conditions for homebuyers in markets across the country." Yun said the widespread shortage of homes for sale is the major factor limiting sales from being higher. While home sales have risen modestly since the start of the year, Yun said without more supply to fully satisfy demand and alleviate the upward pressure on prices, contract activity is likely to remain flat and will more or less continue sideways through the end of the year. Total housing inventory at the end of March was 1.67 million existing homes available for sale, which is 7.2 percent lower than a year ago (1.80 million). Inventory has trended down steadily for the past five years, said Yun, and the country is now experiencing the lowest inventory levels in a generation; unsold inventory is at a 3.6-month supply at the current sales pace, down from 3.8 months a year ago. Yun was joined onstage by Danielle Hale, chief economist at realtor.com®, who agreed there is an acute shortage, especially of affordable inventory. According to realtor.com® data there are 250,000 fewer starter homes, those priced under $200,000, now than there was two years ago, in May 2015. Millennials, boomers and investors may all be going after the same affordable inventory of homes, so competition is great, said Hale. "There is reason for optimism ahead though. We are starting to see new listings grow in recent months; the inventory shortage isn't over, it took us years to get into an inventory rut, so it's going to take us years to get out of it, but we do see signs of a turnaround," she said. Home price growth, up 48 percent from 2011 to 2017 and likely to rise an additional 4 percent in 2018, is far outpacing income growth, up only 15 percent during the same timeframe. Increased home prices on top of rising mortgage rates – Yun anticipates rates will rise to 4.6 percent in 2018 and 5 percent in 2019 – puts affordability at a six-year low, according to NAR's Housing Affordability Index, and will likely continue to fall in coming months. "Challenging affordability conditions have prevented a meaningful rise in the homeownership rate after having fallen to a 50-year low a few years ago," said Yun. "To increase homeownership, more home construction is needed, which could be boosted by delivering regulatory relief to community banks, removing the lumber tariff, re-examining stringent zoning laws and training more workers for the construction industry." On the topic of homeownership rates, Jessica Lautz, NAR's director of demographics and behavioral insights, presented findings during the forum from her thesis from Nottingham Trent University: "Is the Dream Still Alive? Tracking Homeownership Amid Changing Economic and Demographic Conditions". According to Lautz's doctoral work, the affordability crisis has impacted some segments of homebuyers more than others, specifically African American and Hispanic/Latino buyers and those with student debt. Student loan debt has risen dramatically and is a massive barrier to homeownership, said Lautz, and it is delaying home purchases among millennials who are paying their debt by a median of seven years. Her research found that consumers with student loan debt who were successful in buying purchased a home costing 17 percent less than those without any student debt. "The homeownership rate amongst some ethnic groups hasn't rebounded since the recession, and the ongoing affordability crisis has hampered potential buyers under 35, especially those with student debt, from accessing mortgage credit and making home purchases," said Lautz. Yun said consumer optimism that now is a good time to buy a home has fallen the past two years, according to data from NAR and other industry consumer sentiment surveys. While the lack of supply and challenging affordability conditions is chipping away at homebuyer optimism, Hale said buyers aren't giving up their dreams of purchasing a home. New survey data from realtor.com® found three-fourths of recent shoppers started their home search in 2017 and are still in the market in 2018. "Buyers know it's tough, 35 percent of shoppers anticipate a lot of competition, but they remain optimistic, and more than 70 percent expect to close in 2018," she said. Yun said affordability conditions would improve measurably if homebuilders increased their production of homes, especially in the affordable price ranges. He forecasts starts to come in around 1.3 million in 2018 and reach 1.4 million in 2019, but that is barely above year-ago levels and well below demand. The National Association of Realtors® is America's largest trade association, representing 1.3 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.
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Realtor.com Identifies Toughest Housing Markets for Millennials
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Realtors Property Resource (RPR) Sees Record Usage
CHICAGO (April 6, 2018) — Realtors Property Resource®, a subsidiary of the National Association of Realtors®, reached a major milestone for user engagement on the real estate data and analytics platform. Overall engagement among NAR members for the month of March 2018 soared to a record 178,000 - a notable 16 percent increase from March 2017. As one of the platform's key performance indicators, RPR measures usage among several categories, from the number of individual sessions and new website visitors to account creations and webinar registrations. Among those categories, first quarter 2018 web sessions topped 3.7 million, a 27.7 percent increase year over year. RPR webinars witnessed a 135 percent increase in registrations; the average attendance per webinar increased by 158 percent. The number of newly-created accounts in the first quarter also tipped the scales with more than 18,000 Realtors® registering for the platform. RPR Mobile™, the flagship of the platform's "anytime, anywhere" offerings, also experienced significant growth in the first quarter of 2018 with app downloads exceeding 402,000 by Realtors® nationwide. The record numbers are reflective of Realtors®' increasing use of the platform's high-value market data and reports to better serve clients and customers. "I make it my business to help buyers make indisputable offers, lead sellers to realistic list prices, and allow for everyone I represent to benefit from the transaction," says Jickson Chacko, a Realtor® with HomeSmart Realty Group in Denver, Colorado. "And I couldn't do it without RPR." RPR Chief Operating Officer Jeff Young echoed Chacko's sentiment. "We're delighted by the upsurge in activity among our members," says Young. "There's a rising tide among Realtors® who want to know more about how RPR can help build their businesses. We believe 2018 will be a pivotal year for RPR's success." Realtors Property Resource, LLC® (RPR®), a subsidiary of the National Association Of Realtors®, is an exclusive online real estate database created to support the core competence of its members. Covering more than 160 million residential and commercial U.S. properties, RPR provides Realtors® with the analytical power to help clients make informed decisions while increasing efficiency in the marketplace. For more on RPR, visit blog.narrpr.com. The National Association of Realtors® is America's largest trade association, representing 1.3 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.
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Millennial Buyers Feel the Brunt of Rate and Price Hikes
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Rising Rents Push Millennials to Become Homeowners
SANTA CLARA, Calif., March 30, 2018 -- This year, the typical spring buyer is on the hunt for a three bedroom, two bathroom home with a garage and up-to-date kitchen, according to a new survey released today from realtor.com®, a leading online real estate destination. The survey also revealed family needs and rising rents are motivating millennials to get into the market, while 55+ buyers are looking for privacy and comfort in their new home. "Although record-low inventory and high prices make this housing market unique, some classic features still top most shoppers' wish lists," said Danielle Hale, chief economist for realtor.com®. "At the same time, we found some clear differences in priorities. For instance, older buyers are concerned with privacy and being able to age comfortably, while millennials place more emphasis on family needs, stability, and personal expression." Based on online survey of more than 1,000 active buyers conducted in early March by Toluna Research, the survey provides insight into both the most sought after homes as well as the motivations underpinning what shoppers are looking for. Majority of buyers want space, multiple bathrooms, and a garage The survey found many commonalities among homebuyers of all ages. In fact, 44 percent of all respondents said they are looking for a three-bedroom home and 93 percent of respondents want at least two bathrooms. Additionally, 27 percent of all buyers rate a garage as one of the most important home features, ahead of an updated kitchen, 24 percent, and open floor plan, 20 percent. Older Buyers Want Privacy and Comfort; Millennials Favor Family and Self-Expression According to the survey, more than 20 percent of buyers 55 years and older said that privacy – having a space solely of their own – was their main goal for purchasing a home. That was followed by their motivation for physical comforts at 18 percent and stability, at 15 percent. By contrast, family needs took precedence for younger buyers. Fulfilling family needs took the top spot for millennial buyers, at 17 percent, followed by stability at 14 percent and personal expression at 13 percent. Only 12 percent of buyers younger than 55 cited privacy as their chief priority. Only 9 percent of 35- to 54-year-old buyers and 6 percent of 55+ cited personal expression as a main goal for purchasing a home. For Millennials, the Rent is Too High Twenty-three percent of buyers between 18 and 34 years old reported rising rent as a trigger for their desire to purchase a home – more than any other option. This corresponds with steep increases in rents across the country in recent years, especially in many high-cost urban areas that have become magnets for millennials. HUD data shows that rents were up in 85 of the top 100 metro areas, including 9 metros where rents were up by double-digit percent from a year ago. Millennials Like Contemporary and Colonial Homes; Older Buyers Prefer Ranches Among millennials who expressed a home-style preference – 11 percent didn't – contemporary and colonial homes took the top spots, each favored by 10 percent of respondents. On the other hand, ranches are the most popular home style for buyers 55 and older, favored by 28 percent, followed distantly by contemporary homes at 12 percent. Only 6 percent of millennials favor ranch homes. For the full results, please click here. Information about realtor.com®'s 2017 home buyer preference survey is available here. About realtor.com® Realtor.com® is the trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers, offering the most comprehensive source of for-sale properties, among competing national sites, and the information, tools and professional expertise to help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. It pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today helps make all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [NASDAQ: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com®.
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Millennials Lead All Homebuyers, Even as Some Can't Escape Their Parents
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Home Shoppers Move Beyond the Suburbs
Relative affordability, inventory, and jobs are making under the radar secondary markets more appealing SANTA CLARA, Calif., March 1, 2018 -- Forty-one straight months of inventory declines and housing price gains are prompting buyers to expand their home search beyond their immediate metro markets to under the radar secondary markets, according to a new report released today by realtor.com®, a leading online real estate website, that gives insight into which may be America's next top markets to watch. Data shows demand for these markets is being driven by relative affordability, inventory, and strong job markets. The list, in rank order, includes: Spokane, Wash.; Portland, Maine; Knoxville, Tenn.; Deltona, Fla.; Boise, Idaho; Jacksonville, Fla.; Charleston, S.C.; North Port, Fla.; Bakersfield, Calif., and Chattanooga, Tenn. Areas were ranked based on their ratio of inbound to outbound searches, a comparison of people looking in and out of the metro. "Buyers have traditionally sought refuge in the suburbs during times of high home prices," said Javier Vivas, director of economic research at realtor.com®. "But with today's record highs even the suburbs have gotten pricey, which has demand flooding outward as options disappear and prices move further out of reach in top job hubs." Expensive metros fueling demand Generally, those searching in the top 10 are located in the same state or region, but in a far more expensive housing market and likely looking for some price relief. The majority of demand for Spokane, which has a median listing price of $264,000 is coming from Seattle, where the median listing price has reached $500,000. Deltona, where the median listing price is $270,000, and Jacksonville, which has a median home listing price of $307,000, are seeing most of their demand from Miami, where the median home price is $388,000. Although in different states, demand for the new Boise tech hub that has a median price of $299,000 is coming from Los Angeles with a median price of $706,000, Sacramento, Calif. with a median of $443,000, and San Francisco with a median of $846,000. See Figure 1 for full list. "The markets on this list offer affordable housing options and a chance to move up for those who are willing to change jobs or take on longer commutes," added Vivas. Homes available for sale One of the largest factors driving people to these markets is inventory availability. Approximately 1.3 percent of all the homes in these areas are available for sale, compared to 0.9 percent of homes in the top 100 largest U.S. metros. When compared to the markets driving demand to these areas, the difference is even greater. In Florida, Deltona and North Port have 2.1 and 2.2 percent of inventory available for sale, respectively, as compared to their largest viewers of Orlando with .9 percent and New York .8 percent, respectively. Charleston has 1.8 percent of inventory available, compared to 0.8 percent in New York. Boise has 0.9 percent of available, compared to 0.4 percent in Los Angeles. Strong, growing job markets The majority of the areas on the list also have strong job markets. In fact, the average unemployment rate in the top 10 is 3.9 percent, compared to the national rate of 4.1 percent. Portland and Boise offer the lowest unemployment rates of 2.7 percent and 2.8 percent, respectively. Additionally, average projected employment growth this year is 1.8 percent in the top 10, compared to 1.3 percent for the entire list of metros analyzed. Their projected job growth also beat the metros from where they received inbound demand, which averaged 1.3 percent. America's Top 10 Markets to Watch 1. Spokane, Wash. – Located on the eastern edge of Washington, Spokane boasts of tons lakes and parks for those who love to be outdoors, as well as a burgeoning wine scene. Northtown is a popular neighborhood for new and established families because of the quality schools and a strong sense of community in the area. Hutton Elementary and Mead High School are two of the area's top performing schools, earning a score of 9 and 8, respectively on Great Schools. Spokane is also home to Gonzaga University, a private Roman Catholic university that is a large employer in the area. In addition to Gonzaga, Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center & Children's Hospital employs over 5,000 people. Key market statistics – Spokane has a median list price of $264,000 with a median income of $51,000. It is expected to see 2.7 percent job growth this year. 2. Portland, Maine – Portland sits on a peninsula of Casco Bay and is home to areas like Old Port, which is filled with hip bars, boutique shopping, and coffee shops galore. The family-friendly inland area, such as the town of West End, features grand Victorian homes and a strong sense of community. Many people move to this area to escape the hustle and bustle of the city and to cut down their commute. In addition to the many boutique bars, restaurants, and stores that Portland has to offer, major employers include: TD Bank North, the Maine Medical Center, and Unum Life Insurance. Key market statistics – Portland has a median list price of $340,000 with a median income of $68,000. It is expected to have flat job growth this year. 3. Knoxville, Tenn. – Knoxville is popular with a lot of young families because of its relatively low cost of living and high quality of life. The neighborhood of Shady Grove, located southeast of Knoxville, is highly sought after because of its strong school system and close community. L&N Stem Academy and Farragut High School are two of the area's top performing schools, each earning a score of 10 on Great Schools. While Knoxville isn't as well known for entertainment as Nashville, it is home to AC Entertainment, which founded Bonnaroo and High Water Music Festival, and organizes more than 1,000 concerts a year nationally. Key market statistics – Knoxville has a median list price of $247,000 with a median income of $52,000. It is expected to have .9 percent job growth this year. 4. Deltona-Daytona Beach, Fla. – The sunshine draws lots of snowbirds from the north down to Deltona-Daytona Beach to escape cold winters. It appeals to all generations as the area sees both new and established families moving to the area, as well as a generous amount of retirees. Located south of Dayton is Deltona, formerly known as Deltona Lakes, because of its location on the north shore of Lake Monroe. Deltona serves as a commuter city between Daytona and Orlando where many of its residents work. Daytona is a mecca for race enthusiast with the Daytona International Speedway and NASCAR rounding out some of the area's largest employers. Key market statistics – Deltona Beach has a median list price of $270,000 with a median income of $47,000. It is expected to have 2.7 percent job growth this year. 5. Boise, Idaho – Boise features a high quality of life with easy access to outdoor activities, which have made it perfect for those who want to live near a city, but still enjoy the outdoors. The North End is a popular area of Boise known for its historic housing and tree-lined streets. St. Luke's Medical Center, Micron Technology and the West Ada School District round out the area's top employers. Key market statistics – Boise has a median list price of $299,000 with a median income of $56,000. It is expected to have 2.3 percent job growth this year. 6. Jacksonville, Fla. – Jacksonville is a destination for many northerners and south Floridians. Homes ranging from entry level to luxury are all flying off-market, with Atlantic Beach being a supremely popular neighborhood. A top-tier school system, including Bartram Springs Elementary, James Weldon Johnson College Preparatory, and Jacksonville Beach Elementary, which all scored 10s on Great Schools, as well as a strong sense of community make this a very family oriented area. The Jacksonville Naval Station and the Duval Public Schools are the areas two largest employers. Key market statistics – Jacksonville has a median list price of $307,000 with a median income of $59,000. It is expected to have 2.2 percent job growth this year. 7. Charleston, S.C. – Charleston S.C. is where laidback surf vibes meet southern hospitality. The neighborhood of Cannonborough is known for its historic homes, while Upper King boasts of new construction as well as nightlife and great restaurants. The area is seeing lots of older families and professionals from colder states moving to the area. Charleston is also home to Joint Base Charleston, a military facility that sits partially in Charleston and partially in the nearby city of Goose Creek, is the area's largest employer. In addition to the military facility, the Medical University of South Carolina is the area's second largest employer. Key market statistics – Charleston has a median list price of $364,000 with a median income of $63,000. It is expected to have .9 percent job growth this year. 8. North Port Sarasota-Bradenton, Fla. – Downtown Sarasota is going through a revitalization process which is drawing many young professionals to the area. With neighborhoods like Gulf Gate, housing is affordable and the quality of life is high, making it great for both young families and retirees. Gulf Gates close proximity to downtown also makes it popular for those that enjoy the many boutique restaurants and bars the area has to offer. For baseball fans, North Port will become the official home of Spring Training for the Atlanta Braves, starting in 2019. Sarasota Memorial Healthcare System is the area's largest employer, but the area is also home to the Tervis headquarters, which is known for its insulated drinkware. In Bradenton you can find the headquarters for Champs Sports, a nationwide sports apparel company. Key market statistics – Sarasota has a median list price of $350,000 with a median income of $60,000. It is expected to have 2.1 percent job growth this year. 9. Bakersfield, Calif. – Affordable homes, relative to the rest of California, make Bakersfield, especially the North West area, popular with people in every stage of life. Young families are drawn to the area because of the quality of life and a strong school system, while older generations and retirees are drawn to the area because they are able to get a big bang for their buck. Bakersfield Memorial Hospital is the area's largest employer, while Chevron Corporation comes in a close second, followed by Ensign United States Drilling. Key market statistics – Bakersfield has a median list price of $239,000 with a median income of $56,000. It is expected to have 1.1 percent job growth this year. 10. Chattanooga, Tenn. – Chattanooga hosts a vibrant nightlife scene, with plenty of bars and restaurants, as well as easy access to the mountains and lakes for those who enjoy spending time outdoors. East Brainerd, located just 20 minutes from downtown, is popular with young couples and new families, while Hixson boasts higher-end real estate market great for established professionals and families. Volkswagen recently completed a $1 billion production facility in Chattanooga that serves as its North American manufacturing headquarters, and they just announced an additional investment of $600 million and 2,000 new jobs to produce their SUV line. Key market statistics – Chattanooga has a median list price of $230,000 with a median income of $53,000. It is expected to have 2.6 percent job growth this year. Methodology: The top 10 markets to watch list is ranked based on metros with the highest ratio of inbound searches compared to outbound searches on realtor.com®. This cross-market demand data functions as an early alert system, capturing home search activity early in buying cycle and acts as a good predictor of eventual sales activity. To view the full methodology and report, which includes an analysis of markets with the lowest inbound/outbound view ratio and areas where the ratio has grown the most, please click here. About realtor.com® Realtor.com® is the trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers, offering the most comprehensive source of for-sale properties, among competing national sites, and the information, tools and professional expertise to help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. It pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today helps make all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [NASDAQ: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com.
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Redfin Survey: 35% of Recent Homebuyers Bid on a Home Before Seeing it in Person
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Is Salt Lake City the 'Next Denver'?
Growing economy, millennials moving in, and affordable homes point to big growth ahead SANTA CLARA, Calif., Feb. 23, 2018 -- Salt Lake City and Denver have more in common than the fact they are big cities, near big mountains. According to new realtor.com data, Salt Lake City's housing market is seeing the same rapid growth patterns that occurred in Denver in early 2015 and 2016 and that drove the city to the top of the nation's hot housing markets. The Salt Lake City metropolitan area is projected to have one of the strongest housing markets in the country in 2018, with home prices and sales expected to reach 4.5 percent and 4.6 percent growth, respectively, over last year. Just like Denver, the factors driving its strength are a growing economy, relative affordability and an increasing millennial population. In fact, with home prices growing three times faster and supply moving a full week faster in the span of a year, Salt Lake City resembles Denver at the beginning of its boom. "In just a handful of years, an influx of jobs and millennials drove Denver's housing market from strong and stable to rising like the Rockies," said Javier Vivas, director of economic research for realtor.com®. "If Salt Lake City is able to continue generating jobs and attracting well-educated young people, the market has the potential to continue to climb to 'Mile High City'-type heights." A primary cause of Salt Lake City's momentum is its robust economic picture and growing population. The local Salt Lake City economy is growing at 9 percent year-over-year, more than two times faster than the national average. The city is also adding jobs at nearly three times the overall U.S. pace, with employment growing at 3.6 percent year-over-year. Household incomes in the area are growing at 5.4 percent year-over-year, nearly twice the rate for the country as a whole. Last year, population topped 3 million for the first time, which has contributed to an uptick in demand in the market. Despite its strong economy, Salt Lake City remains relatively affordable, particularly in comparison to other hot mid-to-large cities. The median sales price in Salt Lake City at the end of 2017 was $273,000, which is $20,000, $70,000 and $90,000 lower than other growing markets of Austin, Texas; Portland, Ore., and Denver, respectively. A median income household in Salt Lake City can buy a median-priced home with 32 percent of its annual income, roughly in-line with the generally accepted maximum. Market dynamics in Salt Lake City are being driven by its larger-than-average, and growing, proportion of millennials. In fact, its millennial population is 1.3 times higher than the U.S. average and made up 46 percent of its mortgages in 2017, beating the U.S. average by 9 percent. Looking at realtor.com® search activity, Salt Lake City has been drawing interest from Los Angeles, Denver, Las Vegas and San Francisco, showing that it is likely absorbing unquenched millennial demand from these hot markets. Although realtor.com® predicts that demand will be strong and constant in Salt Lake City over the next few years, the longer-term outlook for the city's housing market depends on its ability to continue to create jobs for young professionals and drive housing market demand. If it's successful at doing so – as Denver so far has been – then the Denver market's current conditions provide a reasonable snapshot of what is in store for Salt Lake City. About realtor.com® Realtor.com® is the trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers, offering the most comprehensive source of for-sale properties, among competing national sites, and the information, tools and professional expertise to help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. It pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today helps make all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [NASDAQ: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com.
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Redfin Survey: 15 Percent of Respondents Sold Their Home or Did Not Buy Last Year Due to Concerns about Immigration Policies
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Realtor.com's 2018 Housing Insights Showcase Opportunities for Builders at The NAHB International Builders' Show
Economic projections available at Builders Digital Experience booth ORLANDO, Fla., Jan. 9, 2018 -- Realtor.com® partnered with Builders Digital Experience (BDX) to deliver its unique housing economic insights to the builder community, releasing a special edition of its 2018 Housing Forecast today at The NAHB International Builders' Show®. Realtor.com® 's 2018 housing forecast highlights a growing economy and positive demographic trends, creating opportunities in the housing market despite the affordability challenges buyers will face from rising prices and mortgage rates. Key takeaways for builders in 2018 include: Entry-level home construction a huge opportunity – Entry-level homes will continue to see price gains due to the larger number of buyers who can afford them and more limited homes available for sale in this price range. Millennials anticipated to gain market share in all home price segments – With the largest cohort of millennials expected to turn 30 in 2020, their homeownership market share is expected to increase. As they age into peak family forming years, their top housing priorities will shift from proximity to urban life to more space and quality schools. Southern markets predicted to lead in sales growth – Strong economies and healthy building levels will help drive Southern markets to beat the national average home sales growth. Builders who can adapt to regulatory hurdles in more challenging Western markets will find that prices still outperform national average growth in this region. The tax bill is a game changer – With the passing of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the wealth and income effect of tax cuts will likely stimulate demand and increased production in the short term, but could lead to fewer sales and impact prices negatively over time in markets with higher prices and property taxes. Be wary of economic capacity constraints as inflation will kick in and the Fed will more aggressively increment interest rate increases. "Our collaboration with BDX over the last eight years has enabled builders throughout the country to connect with millions of realtor.com® users," said Tricia Smith, senior vice president of channel sales and operations at realtor.com®. "We are proud to deliver our housing insights to the builder community at a time when many opportunities exist for the new construction industry." "Our relationship with realtor.com® gives our builders a significant advantage as they are marketing their homes," said Tim Costello, CEO of BDX. "From new home community listings to multiple advertising options, we are excited to give our clients the opportunity to connect to this qualified and active group of shoppers." A copy of the full realtor.com® 2018 Housing Forecast, is available at the BDX booth, West Hall W5071, from Jan. 9 - 11. For more housing insights, visit the realtor.com® research portal at www.realtor.com/research. About realtor.com® Realtor.com® is a leading online real estate destination operated by News Corp [NASDAQ: NWS, NWSA]; [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. Realtor.com®, a trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers, offers the most comprehensive source of for-sale properties, among competing national sites, and the information, tools and professional expertise to help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. It pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today helps make all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by Move under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com®. About Builders Digital Experience For more than 16 years, Builders Digital Experience (BDX) has been a leading provider of digital marketing and sales solutions for the home building industry. In addition to running the top new home listing site (NewHomeSource.com), and providing listings and advertising on leading real estate website realtor.com®, BDX offers website development, virtual reality solutions, interactive floor plans, photo realistic renderings, online design centers, and sales center kiosks. Together, these online and interactive resources help builders and manufacturers create a true digital experience for their buyers. BDX is owned by the industry and works with over 1000 clients. For more information, visit http://www.theBDX.com or stop by booth W5071 at the International Builders Show in Orlando.
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Millennials and Silent Generation Drive Desire for Walkable Communities, Say Realtors
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18 Bitcoins will Buy the Average American Home
Redfin Says People are Beginning to Bring Cryptocurrency to the Housing Market SEATTLE--(Dec. 15, 2017) — Redfin, the next-generation real estate brokerage, has seen cryptocurrency starting to become part of the discussion with some clients buying and selling homes over the past three months. Agents in Boston, Chicago, Houston, Philadelphia, Washington D.C. and several cities in California said they've had conversations with people about using cryptocurrency as part of their transaction. Currently, Redfin does not accept cryptocurrency as a form of payment. Bitcoin, the first digital currency that works without a bank or middleman, surged 183.6 percent in the last month, from $5,870.37 per coin on Nov. 12 to $16,650.01 on Dec. 12, according to Bitstamp data. Its market cap is more than $293 billion, and while some analysts warn of a crypto bubble, others say Bitcoin could eventually compete against the gold market. Regardless, cryptocurrency has created fast wealth for investors, and now some are cashing out and going house hunting. Carina Isentaeva, a Redfin agent in San Francisco, recently helped a client write an offer on a luxury home in Silicon Valley that was contingent on the sale of cryptocurrency. The offer was accepted, but the buyer ended up backing out when his cryptocurrency didn't sell. Isentaeva said she's confident he will buy when it does. Jeremy Paul, a Redfin agent in San Diego, also worked with clients who held Bitcoin. He said his clients cashed out two bitcoins, valued at $7,435 each, to cover the closing costs on a home in Carlsbad, CA. And homebuyers aren't the only ones in the cryptocurrency game. Redfin found 75 listings nationwide in which the seller mentioned he or she will accept Bitcoin as payment. The seller of a condo in Miami is requesting payment in Bitcoin only; it will cost the buyer 33 coins. One way to illustrate the unprecedented growth of Bitcoin is to look at the price of the typical home in bitcoins over the past year. For example, in January 2016 in San Francisco, the typical home would have cost a buyer 2,805 bitcoins. Today, the median home in San Francisco is 82 bitcoins. For buyers who have made a lot of money on the recent surge in cryptocurrency value, buying a home is a reasonable way to use the proceeds. For sellers accepting bitcoin, however, it's riskier because accepting cryptocurrency as payment is a bet that it's going to continue to increase. "It's hard to say whether the use of cryptocurrency to buy and sell homes is a long-term trend or just a blip based on the recent spike in value," said Redfin chief economist Nela Richardson. "In some ways, cryptocurrency investors have just won the lottery, and so it makes perfect sense to buy their dream home. On the other side of the ‘coin', sellers probably wouldn't accept lottery tickets as payment." Read the full story here. About Redfin Redfin is the next-generation real estate brokerage, combining its own full-service agents with modern technology to redefine real estate in the consumer's favor. Founded by software engineers, Redfin has the country's #1 brokerage website and offers a host of online tools to consumers, including the Redfin Estimate, the automated home-value estimate with the industry's lowest published error rate for listed homes. Homebuyers and sellers enjoy a full-service, technology-powered experience from Redfin real estate agents, while saving thousands in commissions. Redfin serves more than 80 major metro areas across the U.S. The company has closed more than $50 billion in home sales.
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Tax Bill Raises Concerns about Homeownership; Most Will Change Buying or Selling Plans
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CFPB Launches New Mortgage Performance Trends Tool for Tracking Delinquency Rates
Newly Available Data Shows Lowest Mortgage Delinquency Rate Since the Financial Crisis WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) today announced the launch of a new Mortgage Performance Trends tool that tracks delinquency rates nationwide. Information newly available through this tool shows that mortgage delinquency rates nationally are at their lowest point since the financial crisis. In addition to national data, the online tool features interactive charts and graphs with data on mortgage delinquency rates for 50 states and the District of Columbia at the county and metro-area level. "Measuring the number of consumers who have fallen behind on their mortgage payments is a telling barometer of the health of mortgage markets locally and nationally," said CFPB Director Richard Cordray. "This rich information source identifies mortgage delinquency rates down to the county and metro-area level, making it a useful public tool." With a combined value of roughly $10 trillion, mortgages make up the nation’s largest consumer credit market. A delinquent mortgage is a home loan for which the borrower has failed to make payments as required in the loan documents. If the borrower can't bring the payments on a delinquent mortgage current within a certain time period, the lender may begin foreclosure proceedings. Whether consumers can make their mortgage payments is an important sign of the health of the mortgage market and the overall economy. For instance, job growth, higher wages, and higher home values generally lead to fewer missed or late mortgage payments. The Mortgage Performance Trends tool measures the delinquency rates in two general categories. The first category is comprised of borrowers who are 30 to 89 days behind on their mortgage payments, which generally means they have missed one or two payments. Tracking this rate can detect trends in the increase or decrease in the number of delinquencies, and act as an early warning sign for mortgage market developments that impact the overall economy. The second category is serious delinquencies, which is made up of borrowers who are more than 90 days overdue. If high, this rate reflects more severe economic distress. The interactive charts and maps in the tool track monthly changes in both categories of delinquency rates starting in 2008, when the financial crisis was unfolding. Leading up to the crisis, some lenders originated mortgages to consumers without considering their ability to repay the loans. The decline in underwriting standards led to skyrocketing rates of mortgage delinquencies and foreclosures. As required by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, the CFPB put in place rules to address the issues that helped trigger the crisis. These rules require lenders to assess a borrower’s ability to repay a mortgage before making the loan and require servicers to assist borrowers struggling to repay their mortgages. Mortgage delinquency data reflected in the Mortgage Performance Trends tool shows that among other things: Rates of serious delinquency are at the lowest level since the financial crisis: According to the data, the national rate of seriously delinquent mortgages peaked at 4.9 percent in 2010. As of March 2017, the rate had fallen to 1.1 percent, the lowest level since 2008. Colorado and Alaska have the fewest serious delinquencies, with 0.5 percent. New Jersey and Mississippi have the highest rates of delinquencies of more than 90 days, with 2.1 percent. For mortgages that are delinquent by less than 90 days, Mississippi has the highest rate, at 4.3 percent. Washington State has the lowest rate, at 1 percent. Most states hardest hit by the housing crisis have steadily recovered: At the peak of the financial crisis, both California and Arizona had rates of serious delinquencies of 7.5 percent and 7.6 percent, respectively, and both are now below 1 percent. Nevada, which peaked at 10.7 percent, now has a serious delinquency rate of 1.2 percent, nearly the same as the national average. Florida, which peaked at 9.0 percent, now has a rate of 1.4 percent. Information in the Mortgage Performance Trends tool comes from the National Mortgage Database, which the CFPB and the Federal Housing Finance Agency launched in 2012. The database supports policymaking and research, and helps regulators better understand emerging mortgage and housing market trends. The National Mortgage Database includes information spanning the life of a mortgage loan from origination through servicing and captures a variety of borrower characteristics. It is a nationally representative sample of all outstanding, closed-end, first-lien mortgages for one-to-four family residences. The Mortgage Performance Trends tool has many protections in place to protect personal identity. Before the CFPB or the FHFA receive data for the National Mortgage Database, all records are stripped of information that might reveal a consumer’s identity, such as names, addresses, and Social Security numbers. The new Mortgage Performance Trends tool can be found here.
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Redfin: Migration Patterns Show More People Leaving Politically Blue Counties
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Realtor.com and Yelp Name the Hottest Hipster Markets in America
Columbus, Ohio, Seattle, and San Diego, Calif. rank No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3 SANTA CLARA, Calif., and SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 5, 2017 -- Can't live without your artisanal coffee, avocado toast or an indie record store? Columbus is the place for you, according to a new data collaboration from realtor.com®, a leading online real estate destination operated by News Corp subsidiary Move, Inc., and Yelp, the company that connects consumers with great local businesses. Released today, the realtor.com® Yelp Hottest Hipster Markets in America list identifies the most in-demand housing markets in the U.S. with the highest concentrations of "hipster" businesses for home buyers looking to embrace indie culture. In rank order, the Hottest Hipster Markets in America by ZIP code include: Columbus (43202), Seattle (98122), San Diego (92104), Fort Wayne, Ind. (46802), Rochester, N.Y. (14620), San Francisco (94117), Long Beach, Calif. (90814), Louisville, Ky. (40217), Grand Rapids, Mich. (49506) and Colorado Springs, Colo. (17820). "Although their opinions about their music and fashion may be out of the norm, when it comes to real estate -- hipsters have a knack for getting it right," said Javier Vivas, director of economic research for realtor.com®. "Based on our research, there's clear evidence that "hipster" popularity – in markets like Austin, Texas – has led to mainstream interest and higher home prices over time. Whether it's the farm-to-table restaurants or urban renewal projects that were already underway, a concentration of hipsters seems to be an indicator of a hot housing market." From a housing perspective, all the markets on the realtor.com® Yelp Hottest Hipster Markets in America list have strong market dynamics, showing healthy buyer demand with homes selling in an average of 30 days. Each market also has low or average unemployment rates ranging from 2.7 percent to 4.6 percent, compared to 4.4 nationally. With all the hipster businesses in town it comes as no surprise that these markets are also highly sought after by millennials. Overall, millennials -- ages 25 to 34 -- in the top ten markets make up an average of 22 percent of the population, higher than the national population share of millennials of 13 percent. Additionally, these markets are continuing to draw interest from a younger crowd, as the millennial age group is viewing property listings at a rate 1.2 times greater than the share of millennials already living in the area, indicating strong interest from other millennials wanting to move into these neighborhoods. Yelp data shows that mentions of "hipster" occur across a wide range of businesses, from music venues and dive bars, to restaurants, barbers, and vinyl record shops. While some cities and ZIP codes, like Seattle, may be more recognizable as traditional hipster havens, Yelp data shows that there are many under-the-radar locations where Yelpers have identified neighborhoods that tout cool, hipster businesses. The average star rating of businesses with mentions of hipster in the Columbus zip code is 3.8, with the top 10 ZIP codes averaging 4 stars. Beyond searching for hipster businesses, Yelp also offers tools for homeowners like Request a Quote, which allows people to send requests to up to 10 home service providers at once. "Yelpers are great at identifying up-and-coming areas and businesses, which allows us to predict trends as well as uncover detailed data on what's happening in local economies right now," said Carl Bialik, Yelp data editor. "While 'hipster' is something of a cliche, it turns out to be a useful term to uncover the types of businesses and attributes we often associate with cool hunters, such as visually appealing interiors and less touristy parts of town." The realtor.com® Yelp Hottest Hipster Markets in America list was developed by first leveraging Yelp data to rank ZIP codes by the greatest gap between the share of reviews in the ZIP containing the word "hipster" and the share in the ZIP's city. The realtor.com® Market Hotness Index was then calculated for each market (based on realtor.com® page views and days on market). Markets were then ranked based on a composite index made up of both the Yelp differential and the realtor.com® hotness index. Only one ZIP code per metropolitan area was included. The neighborhoods listed have the most businesses associated with that neighborhood within the ZIP code. To read more about the findings, please visit: realtor.com research + Yelp blogs. Facts About Realtor.com® and Yelp's Top 10 Hipster Markets 1. Columbus - ZIP 43202 (Clintonville, Ohio) The draw: Columbus features art, music, theater, museums, and culture, in addition to being home to Ohio State University. It has a strong economic ecosystem with employers like JP Morgan Chase and a thriving startup scene, with nearly 72 startups for every 1,000 businesses in the area. In addition, after New York and Los Angeles, Columbus is home to more fashion designers than any other U.S. metro area, with a pipeline of young design talent coming from the Columbus College of Art & Design. Clintonville hipster hotspot: Harvest Bar + KitchenReview highlights: Kale Caesar salad, lunch special The stats: The median listing price is $269,455. The median household earns $44,007 a year, with a low county unemployment rate of 3.8 percent. Millennials make up 28.8 percent of its population, contributed contribute to 26 percent of all page views in the area on realtor.com®, and have a median household income of $46,265. 2. Seattle - 98122 (Capitol Hill) The draw: Capitol Hill offers a strong collection of restaurants, bars, boutiques, and culture. Seattle has a booming economy, with tens of thousands of job openings pulling young technophiles into the city. Seattle-dwellers are some of the most active people in the U.S., with open spaces and parks located all around the city, and Mt. Rainier closeby for hiking in the summer and skiing in the winter. Capitol Hill hipster hotspot: Porchlight Coffee & RecordsReview highlights: Cold brew, chill vibe The stats: The median listing price is $756,653. The median household earns $65,367 a year, with a low county unemployment rate of 3.2 percent. Millennials make up 26.6 percent of the population, contribute to 23.8 percent of all page views in the area on realtor.com®, and have a median household income of $61,089. 3. San Diego - 92104 (North Park) The draw: San Diego is known for a plethora of local breweries, farmer's markets, beach eateries and nightlife for the non-mainstream crowd. Compared to California cities like Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area, San Diego boasts of lower rent and mortgages on average. A concentration of top universities and a thriving startup scene bring many young buyers and renters to the area. North Park hipster hotspot: PigmentReview highlights: Air plants, terrariums The stats: The median listing price is $597,000. The median household earns $55,130 a year, with a county unemployment rate of 4.1 percent. Millennials make up 23 percent of the population, contribute to 25.4 percent of all page views in the area on realtor.com®, and have a median household income of $55,772. 4. Fort Wayne - 46802 The draw: Fort Wayne offers fun traditions like BuskerFest, an annual celebration of street performers. Fort Wayne adjusted to the shrinking manufacturing industry faster than its Rust Belt counterparts and today has a strong economy with a lower unemployment rate than other cities in the area. Hipster hotspot: Junk Ditch Brewing CompanyReview highlights: Joseph Decuis Farm Wagyu beef, brunch The stats: The median listing price is $163,925. The median household earns $29,591 a year, with a county unemployment rate of 3.3 percent. Millennials make up 19.9 percent of the population, contribute to 27 percent of all page views in the area on realtor.com®, and have a median household income of $32,243. 5. Rochester - 14620 (Highland Park) The draw: Rochester's Highland Park neighborhood is best-known for its arboretum by the same name, which hosts an annual Lilac Festival drawing in visitors from out of town. From Shakespeare in the Park to live music during the summer, Highland Park is a hotspot for local residents, helping to create the tight-knit community that Rochester residents love. Highland Park hipster hotspot: The Playhouse SwillburgerReview highlights: Pinball machine, vampire fries The stats: The median listing price is $154,925, making it an affordable place for a younger population to settle. The median household earns $43,550 a year, with a county unemployment rate of 4.58 percent. Millennials make up 23.1 percent of the population, contribute to 24 percent of all page views in the area on realtor.com®, and have a median household income of $45,871. 6. San Francisco - 94117 (The Haight) The draw: Hippie mecca Haight-Ashbury has transitioned into a hipster-friendly neighborhood. The Haight offers a plethora of restaurants and bars, and its proximity to Golden Gate Park's free events and concerts can't be beat. The Haight hipster hotspot: The AlembicReview highlights: Cocktail menu, pickled quail eggs The stats: Even San Francisco's most hipster neighborhood costs significantly more than the national average. The median home in The Haight costs $1,396,500. The median household income in this area soars above the national median at $111,817 and its county unemployment rate is well below the national average at 2.9 percent, making the high cost of living more accessible. Millennials make up 31 percent of the population, contribute to 23.8 percent of all page views in the area on realtor.com®, and have a median household income of $113,762. 7. Long Beach - 90814 The draw: Just south of Los Angeles, Long Beach is a more relaxed, cheaper and friendlier option for those drawn to Long Beach's social, tight-knit community and charming Spanish-style homes. Add in great dive bars and a vibrant art scene, and it's no surprise Long Beach is one of the most hipster towns in America. Hipster hotspot: Viento y Agua Coffeehouse & GalleryReview highlights: Open mic nights, Mexican mocha The stats: The median price to buy a home in Long Beach is $737,000. The average household earns $60,751 a year, with an unemployment rate of 4.5 percent. Millennials make up 19.2 percent of the population, contribute to 22.3 percent of all page views in the area on realtor.com, and have a median household income of $52,001. 8. Louisville - 40217 (Schnitzelburg) The draw: With a strong community and affordable local restaurant scene, Schnitzelberg has seen growing popularity over the past several years. Schnitzelberg is a quirky neighborhood with traditions like hosting the World Dainty Championship the last Monday of July. Schnitzelburg hipster hotspot: ZanzabarReview highlights: Bands, pinball machines The stats: Schnitzelberg is one of the most affordable areas on the list, with a median home price of $173,950. The average household earns $53,134 a year, with an unemployment rate of 4.6 percent. Millennials make up 19.3 percent of the population, contribute to 27.7 percent of all page views in the area on realtor.com, and have a median household income of $53,134. 9. Grand Rapids - 49506 The draw: Between the public art installations and extensive craft brewery scene, it's no wonder hipsters love Grand Rapids. It attracts artists, musicians, young families, and has a strong LGBTQ community, which puts on the highly-anticipated Grand Rapids Pride event every summer. Hipster hotspot: Brewery VivantReview highlights: Beer cheese, stained glass window The stats: The median home price in Grand Rapids is $387,000. The average household earns $63,308 a year, with an unemployment rate of 3.2 percent. Millennials make up 13.8 percent of the population, contribute to 25.4 percent of all page views in the area on realtor.com, and have a median household income of $67,680. 10. Colorado Springs - 80903 The draw: Colorado Springs offers the same natural beauty and proximity to world-class skiing and hiking that nearby Denver does, but with a lower cost of living and unemployment rate. Its quaint downtown is filled with mom and pop shops and local watering holes. Hipster hotspot: Shuga'sReview highlights: Patio, lavender lemonade The stats: The median price to buy a home in Colorado Springs is $337,000. The average household earns $37,215 a year, with an unemployment rate of 2.7 percent. Millennials make up 16.8 percent of the population, contribute to 22.5 percent of all page views in the area on realtor.com, and have a median household income of $43,841. Realtor.com® and Yelp's Hottest Hipster Markets About realtor.com® Realtor.com® is the trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers, offering the most comprehensive source of for-sale properties, among competing national sites, and the information, tools and professional expertise to help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. It pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today helps make all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [NASDAQ: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com®. About Yelp Yelp Inc. connects people with great local businesses. Yelp was founded in San Francisco in July 2004. Since then, Yelp communities have taken root in major metros across 32 countries. By the end of Q2 2017, Yelpers had written approximately 135 million rich, local reviews, making Yelp the leading local guide for real word-of-mouth on everything from boutiques and mechanics to restaurants and dentists. Approximately 28 million unique devices* accessed Yelp via the Yelp app, approximately 74 million unique visitors visited Yelp via mobile web** and approximately 83 million unique visitors visited Yelp via desktop*** on a monthly average basis during the Q2 2017. For more information, please visit http://www.yelp.com. * Calculated as the number of unique devices accessing the app on a monthly average basis over a given three-month period, according to internal Yelp logs.** Calculated as the number of "users," as measured by Google Analytics, accessing Yelp via mobile website on a monthly average basis over a given three-month period.*** Calculated as the number of "users," as measured by Google Analytics, accessing Yelp via desktop computer on an average monthly basis over a given three-month period.
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Consumers are Navigating Tides of the U.S. Real Estate Market in New Homeowner Sentiment Survey
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Home Prices Rising Twice as Fast in U.S. Cities with Highest Natural Hazard Risk Than in Lowest-Risk Cities
Homeowners in highest-risk cities have more equity, longer homeownership tenures; appreciation slower in Florida and Louisiana cities with highest flood risk, bucking trend IRVINE, Calif. – Sept. 21, 2017 — ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's largest multi-sourced property database, today released its 2017 U.S. Natural Hazard Housing Risk Index, which found that median home prices in U.S. cities in the 80th percentile for natural hazard risk (top 20 percent with highest risk) have increased more than twice as fast over the past five years and over the past 10 years than median home prices in U.S cities in the 20th percentile for natural hazard risk (bottom 20 percent with lowest risk). For the report ATTOM indexed natural hazard risk in more than 3,000 counties and more than 22,000 U.S. cities based on the risk of six natural disasters: earthquakes, floods, hail, hurricane storm surge, tornadoes, and wildfires. ATTOM also analyzed housing trends in 3,441 cities and 735 counties — containing more than 71 million single family homes and condos — broken into five equal quintiles of natural hazard housing risk (see full methodology below). Median home prices in cities in the top 20 percent (Very High) for natural hazard risk have appreciated 65 percent on average over the past five years and 9 percent on average over the past 10 years while median home prices cities in the bottom 20 percent (Very Low) for natural hazard risk have appreciated 32 percent on average over the past five years and 3 percent on average over the past 10 years. "Strong demand for homes in high-risk natural hazard areas has helped to accelerate price appreciation in those areas over the past decade despite the potential for devastating damage to homes that can be caused by a natural disaster — as evidenced by the recent hurricanes that made landfall in Texas and Florida," said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president at ATTOM Data Solutions. "That strong demand is driven largely by economic fundamentals, primarily the presence of good-paying jobs, although the natural beauty that often comes hand-in-hand with high natural hazard risk in these areas is also attractive to many homebuyers. "There is some evidence in the data that real estate consumers in certain areas are beginning to more heavily factor natural hazard risk into their decisions, particularly when it comes to flood risk," Blomquist added. "Counter to the national trend, home price appreciation is slower in Florida and Louisiana cities with the highest flood risk than in cities with the lowest flood risk." Appreciation slower in Florida and Louisiana Cities with highest flood risk In the state of Florida, median home prices in cities with the highest flood risk were up 8 percent on average from a year ago and up 66 percent from five years ago while median prices in cities with the lowest flood risk were up 10 percent from a year ago and 70 percent from five years ago. Median home prices in Florida cities with the highest hurricane storm surge risk were up 8 percent from a year ago and 47 percent from five years ago, while median prices in cities with the lowest hurricane storm surge risk were up 11 percent from a year ago and up 67 percent from five years ago. There was a similar trend in relation to flood risk in the state of Louisiana, which experienced damaging floods in August 2016. Median home prices in Louisiana cities with the highest flood risk were down 20 percent from a year ago and up 2 percent from five years ago while median home prices in the lowest risk cities increased 5 percent over the past year and increased 37 percent over the past five years. Homeowners in highest-risk cities have more equity, longer homeownership tenures Homeowners in cities in the top 20 percent for natural hazard risk have 32 percent home equity on average compared to 21 percent home equity on average for homeowners in cities in the bottom 20 percent for natural hazard risk. Seriously underwater homes (LTV of 125 percent or higher) account for 6.4 percent of all homes in cities in the top 20 percent for natural hazard risk compared to a seriously underwater rate of 9.9 percent on average for homes in cities in the bottom 20 percent for natural hazard risk. Homeowners who sold in the first six months of 2017 had owned for an average of 8.89 years in cities in the top 20 percent for natural hazard risk compared to an average homeownership tenure of 8.03 years in cities in the bottom 20 percent for natural hazard risk. Counties and cities with highest natural hazard risk index Among the 735 U.S. counties included in the housing trends analysis, those with the highest overall natural hazard index were Oklahoma County, Oklahoma; Wakulla County (Tallahassee), Florida; Monroe County (Key West), Florida; Cleveland County (Oklahoma City), Oklahoma; and Nevada County (Truckee), California. Among 50 U.S. cities included in the analysis with a population of at least 500,000, those with the highest overall natural hazard housing risk index were Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; San Jose, California; Los Angeles, California; Bakersfield, California; and Seattle, Washington. Counties and cities with lowest natural hazard risk index Among the 735 U.S. counties included in the housing trends analysis, those with the lowest overall natural hazard index were Milwaukee County (Milwaukee), Wisconsin; Cuyahoga County (Cleveland), Ohio; Muskegon County (Muskegon), Michigan; and Lake County (Cleveland), Ohio. Among 50 U.S. cities included in the analysis with a population of at least 500,000, those with the lowest overall natural hazard housing risk index were Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Phoenix, Arizona; Buffalo, New York; Orlando, Florida; and Brooklyn, New York. About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions is the curator of the ATTOM Data Warehouse, a multi-sourced national property database that blends property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, health hazards, neighborhood characteristics and other property characteristic data for more than 150 million U.S. residential and commercial properties. The ATTOM Data Warehouse delivers actionable data to businesses, consumers, government agencies, universities, policymakers and the media in multiple ways, including bulk file licenses, APIs and customized reports.
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Redfin Data Reveals Single Women Build Less Home Equity Over Time Than Single Men
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New Survey from Cartus Shows Employee Relocation Trends are Changing Shape
DANBURY, Conn., Aug. 24, 2017 -- The U.S. workforce is changing and, with it, so are the ways in which employees are being relocated for companies across the United States. Cartus Corporation, a leading provider of global relocation services, recently released its 2017 Domestic U.S. Relocation Policy and Practices Survey results, a report that examines the responses of 141 mobility managers representing more than 10 million employees. While the overall survey explores trends in how companies are supporting home sale for transferring employees, responding to a growing rental population, and developing intern programs, the primary finding is the identification of a changing pattern in employee relocation, in which an increasing demand for flexibility is translating into different types of work transfers. What's Driving U.S. Relocation Programs? U.S. relocation programs have always been a reflection of the larger business and economic picture. As companies seek to make sure they have the right people in the right places to meet organizational goals, they have traditionally been balancing demands for cost effectiveness with the need to recruit, retain, and develop their talent. Today, companies are adding a third element to the juggling act: employees' growing expectations for a positive experience that translates into greater engagement and productivity. That combination of demands is leading to a new catalyst trend: the push for more flexibility in how employees move for work, and what kinds of support they are provided. Juggling Act: Balancing the Challenges Driving U.S. Relocation Cost: 65 percent of survey respondents cited cost as a significant challenge facing their companies' relocation programs today – up 13 percentage points in the last eight years. Talent Management: 52 percent of respondents said that talent shortages had increased somewhat, or significantly; this leads to "talent pressure" and a need to overcome those shortages. Employee Engagement: With the stagnation of salaries in U.S. corporations, there is a need to ensure that all aspects of the workplace provide a positive experience for employees. This has been cited consistently among Cartus clients of all sizes as a rising issue. These pressures are leading to a need for more flexibility, as evidenced by the 78% percent of survey respondents who stated that changing employee needs or expectations were driving the need for flexibility. In the domestic U.S. relocation arena, this has resulted in offering more flexibility in policies, as well as a growth in short-term assignments and other temporary transfer forms for ongoing business needs. In fact, 75 percent of responding companies cited utilizing these short-term assignments to provide knowledge or skills transfer or training, while 72 percent use them to address specific project work. As managers of U.S. relocation programs continue to explore ways to meet their companies' changing needs, it is likely that the need to balance a superior employee experience, cost control, and talent development will drive a continued focus on flexible approaches. How companies choose to meet this pressure will always depend on their organization's move patterns, culture, and demographics. If you are responsible for your company's domestic relocation program, we encourage you to review a copy of Cartus' 2017 Domestic U.S. Relocation Policy and Practices Survey findings for more information on trends, challenges and policy approaches. About Cartus For more than 60 years, Cartus has provided trusted guidance to organizations of all types and sizes that require global relocation solutions. Providing the full spectrum of relocation services, including language and intercultural training, Cartus serves more than half of the Fortune 50 and has moved employees into and out of 185 countries. Cartus is part of Realogy Holdings Corp. (NYSE: RLGY), a global leader in real estate franchising and provider of real estate brokerage, relocation and settlement services. To find out how our greater experience, reach, and hands-on guidance can help your company, visit www.cartus.com, or click www.realogy.com for more information.
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Redfin Migration Report: Home Affordability Continued to Shape Migration Currents as Homebuyers Looked to Leave Expensive Coastal Cities in the Second Quarter
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Realtors® Report Finds 11 Percent Increase in Commercial Member Income, 19 Percent Increase in Sales Transaction Volume
WASHINGTON (August 2, 2017) – Commercial real estate markets continue to improve, with Realtors® specializing in commercial real estate reporting both an increase in member's gross income and sales volume, according to the National Association of Realtors® 2017 Commercial Member Profile. The annual study's results represent Realtors®, members of NAR, who conduct all or part of their business in commercial sales, leasing, brokerage and development for land, office and industrial space, multifamily and retail buildings, as well as property management. "There has been an uptick in Realtor® members who choose to specialize in commercial real estate at the same time as commercial professionals report improvements in the market and their business activity," said 2017 NAR President William E. Brown, a Realtor® from Alamo, California. "A stronger commercial market is a good indicator of a growing economy, so the outlook is positive for commercial members in the year ahead." The median gross annual income for commercial members in 2016 was $120,800, an increase from $108,800 in 2015. Brokers and appraisers tend to report the highest median annual incomes, while sales agents report the lowest among licensees. Those with less than two years of experience reported a median annual income of $31,500 in 2016, down from $43,400 in 2015; members with more than 26 years of experience reported a median annual income of $162,200 in 2016, down from $165,400 in 2015. Commercial members completed a median of eight sales transactions in 2016, a decrease of one since 2015. A quarter of commercial members reported having one to four transactions, and 27 percent reported having more than 20 transactions. While the number of transactions decreased slightly in 2016, the sales volume increased again this year. The median sales transaction volume in 2016 among members who had a transaction was $3,500,000, an increase from $2,931,000 in 2015. Only 7 percent of commercial members reported not having a transaction at all, which decreased from 8 percent in 2015. The median years of experience in real estate increased to 24 years in 2017, up from 20 years in 2016, as did the median years of experience of members in commercial real estate – up from 15 years in 2016 to 19 years in 2017. Forty-seven percent of NAR's commercial members are brokers, and 30 percent are licensed sales agents, consistent with last year. Seventeen percent of commercial members have a broker-associate license while appraisal license holders account for 5 percent, also consistent with last year. The median age of commercial members remained the same as last year, at 60 years old. Almost three out of four commercial members are male, identical to last year's results. Men reported being active in any real estate capacity for a median of 25 years and in commercial real estate for a median of 20 years, the same as last year. Women have been active in real estate for a median of 19 years (up from 14 years last year) and in commercial real estate for a median of 15 years (up from 11 years last year). Commercial members who manage properties typically managed 82,000 total square feet, representing 15 total spaces, up from 50,000 square feet and 17 spaces in 2015. Those who manage offices typically managed 25,000 total office square feet, representing seven total offices, up from 20,000 office square feet and five offices last year. Thirty-three percent of commercial members were involved in international transactions in 2016, down 2 percent from 2015. Eighteen percent of commercial members reported an increase in international transactions, while only 1 percent had a decrease. Sixty-five percent (up from 60 percent in 2016) of respondents are members of any of several commercial affiliated institutes, councils, or societies. These commercial organizations include the CCIM Institute, the Institute of Real Estate Management, the Counselors of Real Estate, the Realtors® Land Institute and the Society of Industrial and Office Realtors®. In June 2017, NAR invited a random sample of 64,147 Realtors® with an interest in commercial real estate to fill out an on-line survey. A total of 1,926 responses were received for an overall response rate of 3.0 percent. All information in this report is representative of member characteristics in 2017 while sales and lease transaction values and income are characteristic of calendar year 2016. The National Association of Realtors®, "The Voice for Real Estate," is America's largest trade association, representing 1.2 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.
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84 Percent of Americans See Homeownership as Good Investment, Affordability a Growing Concern
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71 Percent of Homeowners Believe It's a Good Time to Sell; Economic and Financial Confidence Dips: Realtors® HOME Survey
WASHINGTON (June 26, 2017) — Existing housing inventory has declined year over year each month for two straight years, but new consumer findings from the National Association of Realtors® offer hope that the growing number of homeowners who think now is a good time to sell will eventually lead to more listings. That's according to NAR's quarterly Housing Opportunities and Market Experience (HOME) survey, which also found that fewer renters think it's a good time to buy a home, and respondents are less confident about the economy and their financial situation than earlier this year despite continuous job gains. One trend gaining steam in the HOME survey is an increased share of homeowners who believe now is a good time to sell their home. This quarter, 71 percent of homeowners think now is a good time to sell, which is up from last quarter (69 percent) and considerably more than a year ago (61 percent). Respondents in the Midwest (76 percent) surpassed the West (72 percent) for the first time this quarter to be the most likely to think now is a good time to sell. Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist, says it's apparent there's a mismatch between homeowners' confidence in selling and actually following through and listing their home for sale. "There are just not enough homeowners deciding to sell because they're either content where they are, holding off until they build more equity, or hesitant seeing as it will be difficult to find an affordable home to buy," he said. "As a result, inventory conditions have worsened and are restricting sales from breaking out while contributing to price appreciation that remains far above income growth." Added Yun, "Perhaps this notable uptick in seller confidence will translate to more added inventory later this year. Low housing turnover is one of the roots of the ongoing supply and affordability problems plaguing many markets." On the decline: renter morale about buying a home and financial and economic optimism Confidence among renters that now is a good time to buy a home continues to retreat. Fifty-two percent of renters think now is a good time to buy, which is down both from last quarter (56 percent) and a year ago (62 percent). Conversely, 80 percent of homeowners (unchanged from last quarter and a year ago) think now is a good time to make a home purchase. Younger households, and those living in urban areas and in the costlier West region are the least optimistic. The surge in economic optimism seen in the first quarter of the year appears to be short lived. The share of households believing the economy is improving fell to 54 percent in the second quarter after soaring to a survey high of 62 percent last quarter. Homeowners, and those living in the Midwest and in rural and suburban areas are the most optimistic about the economy. Only 42 percent of urban respondents believe the economy is improving, which is a drastic decrease from the 58 percent a year ago. Dimming confidence about the economy's direction is also leading households to not have as strong feelings about their financial situation. The HOME survey's monthly Personal Financial Outlook Index showing respondents' confidence that their financial situation will be better in six months fell to 57.2 in June after jumping in March to its highest reading in the survey. A year ago, the index was 57.7. "It should come as little surprise that the confidence reading among renters has fallen every month since January (64.8) and currently sits at its lowest level (53.8) since tracking began in March 2015 (65.7)," said Yun. "Paying more in rent each year and seeing home prices outpace their incomes is discouraging, and it's unfortunately pushing home ownership further away — especially for those living in expensive metro areas on the East and West Coast." Under half of respondents believe homes are affordable for most buyers; one in five would consider moving In this quarter's survey, respondents were also asked about the affordability of homes in their communities. Overall, only 42 percent of respondents believe they are affordable for almost all buyers, with those living in the Midwest being the most likely to believe homes are affordable (55 percent) — and not surprisingly — West respondents (29 percent) being least likely to think homes are affordable. Additionally, 20 percent of respondents would consider moving to another more affordable community. Those earning under $50,000 annually (27 percent) and those age 34 and under (29 percent) were the most likely to indicate they would consider moving. "Areas with strong job markets but high home prices risk a migration of middle-class households to other parts of the country if rising housing costs in those areas are not contained through a significant ramp-up in new home construction," said Yun. About NAR's HOME survey In April through early June, a sample of U.S. households was surveyed via random-digit dial, including a mix of cell phones and land lines. The survey was conducted by an established survey research firm, TechnoMetrica Market Intelligence. Each month approximately 900 qualified households responded to the survey. The data was compiled for this report and a total of 2,711 household responses are represented. The National Association of Realtors®, "The Voice for Real Estate," is America's largest trade association, representing 1.2 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.
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