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U.S. Properties with Foreclosure Filings on the Rise as Pandemic Remains a Threat to Economy
11,673 U.S. Properties Received a Foreclosure Filing in October 2020, Up 20 Percent from Last Month; Foreclosure Rates Highest in South Carolina, Nebraska and Alabama; Foreclosure Starts Uptick Monthly in North Carolina, Ohio and Illinois IRVINE, Calif. - November 10, 2020 -- ATTOM Data Solutions, licensor of the nation's most comprehensive foreclosure data and parent company to RealtyTrac, a foreclosure listings portal, today released its October 2020 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report, which shows there were a total of 11,673 U.S. properties with foreclosure filings — default notices, scheduled auctions or bank repossessions — in October 2020, up 20 percent from a month ago but down 79 percent from a year ago. "It's a little surprising to see foreclosure activity increasing in spite of the various foreclosure moratoria that are in place," said Rick Sharga, executive vice president of RealtyTrac, an ATTOM Data Solutions company. "It's likely that many of these properties were already in the early stages of default prior to the pandemic, or are vacant and abandoned, which makes them candidates for expedited foreclosure actions." South Carolina, Nebraska and Alabama post highest state foreclosure rates Nationwide one in every 11,683 housing units had a foreclosure filing in October 2020. States with the highest foreclosure rates were South Carolina (one in every 6,133 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Nebraska (one in every 6,246 housing units); Alabama (one in every 6,660 housing units); Louisiana (one in every 7,078 housing units); and Florida (one in every 7,208 housing units). Among the 220 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000, those with the highest foreclosure rates in October 2020 were Peoria, IL (one in every 1,543 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Champaign, IL (one in every 1,674 housing units); Beaumont, TX (one in every 1,880 housing units); Birmingham, AL (one in every 1,993 housing units); and Houma, LA (one in every 2,964 housing units). Those metropolitan areas with a population greater than 1 million that posted the worst foreclosure rates in October 2020, including Birmingham, AL, were Cleveland, OH (one in every 4,511 housing units); Jacksonville, FL (one in every 5,119 housing units); New Orleans, LA (one in every 6,397 housing units); and Miami, FL (one in every 6,794 housing units). Foreclosure starts increase monthly nationwide A total of 6,042 U.S. properties started the foreclosure process in October 2020, up 21 percent from last month but down 79 percent from a year ago. While foreclosure starts are down annually in many states across the nation, a few states did see annual increases in foreclosure starts in October 2020, including Idaho (up 109 percent) and Nebraska (up 56 percent). Those states that posted the greatest monthly increases and that had 200 or more foreclosure starts in October 2020, included North Carolina (up 294 percent); Ohio (up 74 percent); Illinois (up 30 percent); New York (up 24 percent); and South Carolina (up 18 percent). Among metropolitan areas with a population greater than 1 million, those with the greatest number of foreclosure starts in October 2020 were New York, NY (485 foreclosure starts); Chicago, IL (240 foreclosure starts); Los Angeles, CA (196 foreclosure starts); Miami, FL (151 foreclosure starts); and Houston, TX (143 foreclosure starts). "It's probably not a surprise that almost all of the metro areas where foreclosure activity increased on a month-over-month basis are also places where unemployment rates are higher than the national average, and in many cases have been hotspots of COVID-19 infections," Sharga noted. "Still, it's important to keep the numbers in context – even with these increases, overall foreclosure actions are still below last year's levels by about 80%." Bank repossessions see a 28 percent increase from last month Lenders foreclosed (REO) on a total of 2,577 U.S. properties in October 2020, up 28 percent from last month but down 81 percent from a year ago. States that posted the greatest number of completed foreclosures (REOs) in October 2020, included Alabama (268 REOs filed); Florida (261 REOs filed); California (194 REOs filed); Texas (186 REOs filed); and Pennsylvania (145 REOs filed). Among the metropolitan areas with a population greater than 1 million, those with the greatest number of REOs filed in October 2020, included Birmingham, AL (233 REOs filed); Philadelphia, PA (98 REOs filed); New York, NY (97 REOs filed); Chicago, IL (62 REOs filed); and Miami, FL (52 REOs filed). About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides foreclosure data licenses that can power various enterprise industries including real estate, insurance, marketing, government, mortgage and more. ATTOM multi-sources from 3,000 counties property tax, deed, mortgage, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. About RealtyTrac (Powered by ATTOM's Property Data) RealtyTrac.com is the premier foreclosure listing and search portal for investors and consumers looking to gain a competitive edge in the distressed market. Realtytrac.com grants access to insight that is typically only available to real estate professionals.
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High Demand and Low Inventory Continue Streak of High Residential Showing Traffic in Cities and Metropolitan Areas of U.S.
Data from ShowingTime lists Seattle, Denver, Washington, D.C., Salt Lake City, Cleveland, Boston and Baltimore among the areas recording a high number of home showings in September CHICAGO - October 30, 2020 - ShowingTime, the residential real estate industry's leading showing management and market stats technology provider, found that showing traffic remained strong in large metropolitan areas, with Seattle, Denver, Washington, D.C., Salt Lake City, Boston and Baltimore recording high numbers of home showings during the month of September according to the company's Showing Index®. With low inventory and sustained buyer demand, traffic jumped 64.1 percent year-over-year nationwide. "All but one of the top 20 markets with the heaviest buyer traffic recorded double-digit showings per listing in September, well above the current U.S. average of six showings per listing," said Michael Lane, President of ShowingTime. "That number more than doubled in several markets from the same time last year, despite the pandemic." Meanwhile, some communities along the beleaguered Gulf Coast – hit hard by Hurricane Laura at the end of August and Hurricane Delta in early October – experienced year-over-year declines in showings. Nevertheless, Louisiana is tracking ahead of 2019 figures for showing activity in what has proven to be a resilient real estate market. "In September, we saw a normal seasonal slowdown of about 8 percent from August," said ShowingTime Chief Analytics Officer Daniil Cherkasskiy. "Due to much lower levels of available inventory, however, showing activity is still significantly above last year's values, a situation that is likely to persist through next May." The Northeast Region saw a year-over-year increase in buyer traffic of 68.4 percent in September, marking the fourth consecutive month the region recorded the largest jump in showing activity. The West's 65.3 percent uptick followed, with the Midwest's 61.6 percent rise and the South's climb of 60.8 percent both close behind. "The showing traffic data suggests that buyers and sellers alike are undeterred from completing their real estate transactions," added Lane. "It's clear that real estate professionals have made adjustments and increased their efforts to make the most of this market." The ShowingTime Showing Index is compiled using data from more than six million property showings scheduled across the country each month on listings using ShowingTime products and services. The Showing Index tracks the average number of appointments received on active listings during the month. To view the full report, visit showingtime.com/showingtime-showing-index/. About ShowingTime ShowingTime is the residential real estate industry's leading showing management and market stats technology provider, with more than 1.7 million active listings subscribed to its services. Its products are used in 370 MLSs representing one million real estate professionals across the U.S. and Canada. Contact us at [email protected]
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ShowingTime's Data Finds Home Showings Continue at a Torrid Pace, Jumping Nationwide for Fourth Consecutive Month
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Realtor.com Weekly Housing Report: Nearly 400,000 Fewer Homes Have Been Listed Since the Start of the Pandemic
Overall market strength shows slight improvement over last week due to the containment of natural disasters SANTA CLARA, Calif., Sept. 24, 2020 -- Since the beginning of the COVID pandemic in March, nearly 400,000 fewer homes have been listed compared to last year, leaving a gaping hole in the U.S. housing inventory, according to realtor.com's Weekly Housing Report for the week ending Sept. 19. As a result, home prices are accelerating at double last year's pace while homes sell 12 days faster than last year, on average. "Sellers are more reluctant to list their home given the uncertainty over the economy and the pandemic environment. Buyers on the other hand, especially hungry first timers, remain largely unfazed by the challenges, and are motivated by low mortgage rates and the fear of missing out on the right home," said Javier Vivas, director of economic research for realtor.com®. "The majority of sellers are also buyers, so even as new listings hit the market, another buyer is also added. Adding to the inventory issues, thousands of previously vacant homes, such as second homes and rentals, have been reoccupied by their owners during the pandemic, effectively taking them off the market." Number of homes on the market remains woefully behind last year Since mid-March (the beginning of the COVID pandemic), a total of 2.91 million unique properties have been put on the market for sale. This is approximately 390,000 fewer homes than the 3.30 million listed during the same period last year. As of this week, the number of homes on the market is down 39% compared to last year. With the typical seasonal slowdown approaching, relief in terms of more available homes for sale is unlikely. The number of new listings hitting the market this week was down 15% compared to last year, a slight improvement over last week's decline of 17%. The slight uptick was likely a result of having a full work week compared to the short holiday week (Labor Day), as well as better containment of wildfires on the West Coast. Home prices continued to see record breaking growth Median listing prices continued to grow at last week's record breaking pace of 11.1% year-over-year. This is more than double January 2020's price acceleration and the 19th week in a row of price acceleration. Homes are selling even faster than last week Homes are selling in 53 days, which is 12 days faster on average than this time last year, and one day faster than last week. The rapid turnover is fueling home sales, and keeping the market from stalling. With buyer demand showing no signs of cooling, homes are expected to continue flying off the market, despite a depleted supply. Housing market strengthens after last week's disasters Realtor.com® tracks the overall strength of the housing market through its proprietary Housing Market Recovery Index, which compares real-time key indicators including trends in number of searches on realtor.com®, median listing prices, the number of newly listed homes, and the time it takes to sell to January 2020, prior to the pandemic. This week, the index was 107.2 points, 1.0 point stronger than last week and 7.2 points stronger than it was pre-COVID. The slight improvement over last week can be attributed to the containment of fire and hurricane damage, which had weakened levels of supply.   About realtor.com® Realtor.com® makes buying, selling and living in homes easier and more rewarding for everyone. Realtor.com® pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today through its website and mobile apps is a trusted source for the information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. Using proprietary data science and machine learning technology, realtor.com® pairs buyers and sellers with local agents in their market, helping take the guesswork out of buying and selling a home. For professionals, realtor.com® is a trusted provider of consumer connections and branding solutions that help them succeed in today's on-demand world. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com®.
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Homebuyers on a $2,500 Monthly Budget Can Afford $33,000 More with Low Mortgage Rates, But Higher Home Prices Cancel Out Increase
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Historic Jump in Showing Activity Seen Nationwide as July Home Buyer Traffic Surges 60.7 Percent
Buyer Demand Continues to Outstrip Supply Following Third Consecutive Month of Increasing Showing Traffic August 26, 2020 - Home buyer traffic jumped again in July, recording a 60.7 percent year-over-year increase in nationwide showing activity according to data from the ShowingTime Showing Index®. It marked the third consecutive month of growing foot traffic in all four U.S. regions, a sign of the continued resilience of the U.S. residential real estate market and sustained buyer demand. The latest data from ShowingTime also reveal continued adoption of virtual showings, as the number of listings set up to allow both in-person and virtual appointments increased 28 percent in July. "Multiple existing trends continued and were amplified in July as buyers competed for a dwindling supply of homes, pushing the level of competition and prices higher across all major regions of the U.S.," said ShowingTime Chief Analytics Officer Daniil Cherkasskiy. "Part of the imbalance can be attributed to the fact that potential sellers are not yet seeing the latest negotiated selling prices, which usually come out with a one-to-two-month delay. "In previous years, July would be the month when real estate activity begins to slow down," Cherkasskiy said. "In 2020, July became the peak month of the delayed busy season. A glimpse at August trends also suggests that demand is staying at this high level and may continue to do so through at least September." For the second consecutive month, the Northeast saw the most significant boost in year over year activity, with a 76.6 percent increase. The West followed, with a 56.7 percent jump, while the Midwest recorded a 52.1 percent increase and the South saw a 46.7 percent uptick. "All indications point to sustained growth in buyer demand, and we're committed to helping agents meet it," said ShowingTime President Michael Lane. "The rate of agent adoption of ShowingTime LIVE Video continues to increase, which demonstrates its utility as a valuable tool to keep showings going when in-person showings aren't possible." The ShowingTime Showing Index, the first of its kind in the residential real estate industry, is compiled using data from more than six million property showings scheduled across the country each month on listings using ShowingTime products and services, providing a benchmark to track buyer demand. Released monthly, the Showing Index tracks the average number of appointments received on active listings during the month. Localized MLS indices are also generated for select markets and are distributed to MLS and association leadership. To view the full report, visit showingtime.com/showingtime-showing-index/. About ShowingTime ShowingTime is the residential real estate industry's leading showing management and market stats technology provider, with more than 1.7 million active listings subscribed to its services. Its showing products and services simplify the appointment scheduling process for real estate professionals, buyers and sellers, resulting in more showings, more feedback and more efficient sales. Its MarketStats division provides interactive tools and easy-to-read market reports for MLSs, associations, brokers, agents and other real estate companies, as well as a recruiting tool for brokers. ShowingTime products are used in 370 MLSs representing one million real estate professionals across the U.S. and Canada. For more information, contact us at [email protected]
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Urban Rental Markets Show Signs of Cooling
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Nationwide Surge in June Home Buyer Activity Continues Historic Turnaround, with Agents Seeing a 50 Percent Increase in Showings per Listing
Buyer Demand Jumps in all Regions for the Second Consecutive Month July 27, 2020 - Home buyers were out in droves nationwide in June resulting in the second consecutive month of surging home showing activity, with agents seeing 50 percent more showings per listing according to data from the ShowingTime Showing Index. June's 50.1 percent year-over-year jump in nationwide buyer traffic resembled that typically seen in the spring, as agents and buyers made up for pandemic-induced lost time by continuing to leverage historically low mortgage rates and newly available virtual showing technology. Since May, ShowingTime has facilitated more than 52,000 home showings hosted virtually, a number expected to grow throughout the summer. "In June, we saw the full effect of the rebound in the intensity of buyer traffic in the US," said ShowingTime Chief Analytics Officer Daniil Cherkasskiy. “The Showing Index tracks the average number of showings per listing, and while the absolute number of showings increased between 13 percent and 15 percent, a substantial increase, the number of showable listings decreased by 23 percent. Thus, the average listing is receiving 50 percent more appointments, concentrated in the first two weeks of the listing's market time. This unprecedented surge is amplified by the increasing shift of soft interactions between market participants to technology tools, leading to greater efficiency, shorter turnaround times and a larger number of appointments scheduled." The Northeast saw the largest jump in year over year showing activity, with a 66.9 percent increase in June. The West Region's 48 percent boost came next, followed by an increase in the Midwest of 40.2 percent and in the South of 39.6 percent. In June, ShowingTime LIVE Video, which enables agents and their buyers to use the ShowingTime mobile app to take part in live, interactive video showings, continued to expand into markets across North America. Since it was first made available in select markets in May, ShowingTime LIVE Video has become a popular option for agents to conduct virtual showings for buyers, who participate from the comfort of their own homes. "We're pleased to continue helping agents meet pent-up client demand with innovations designed to keep showings going, safely and efficiently," said ShowingTime President Michael Lane. "The feedback we've received so far for ShowingTime LIVE Video has been very positive. We're looking forward to expanding its availability in markets throughout North America in the weeks and months to come." The ShowingTime Showing Index, the first of its kind in the residential real estate industry, is compiled using data from property showings scheduled across the country on listings using ShowingTime products and services, providing a benchmark to track buyer demand. ShowingTime facilitates more than five million showings each month. Released monthly, the Showing Index tracks the average number of appointments received on active listings during the month. Local MLS indices are also available for select markets and are distributed to MLS and association leadership. To view the full report, visit showingtime.com/showingtime-showing-index/. About ShowingTime ShowingTime is the residential real estate industry's leading showing management and market stats technology provider, with more than 1.2 million active listings subscribed to its services. Its showing products and services simplify the appointment scheduling process for real estate professionals, buyers and sellers, resulting in more showings, more feedback and more efficient sales. Its MarketStats division provides interactive tools and easy-to-read market reports for MLSs, associations, brokers, agents and other real estate companies, as well as a recruiting tool for brokers. ShowingTime products are used in 370 MLSs representing one million real estate professionals across the U.S. and Canada. For more information, contact us at [email protected]
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Realtor.com Weekly Recovery Report: Record Breaking Traffic Signals Summer Buying Season is Here
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Realtor.com Launches Weekly Housing Recovery Index
Data shows housing recovery remains strong despite social unrest SANTA CLARA, Calif., June 11, 2020 -- COVID-19 and economic headwinds have led to unprecedented disruptions in the U.S. real estate market. In order to track the impact of these events, realtor.com today announced the launch of its Housing Recovery Index, which shows that despite continued COVID cases and the large scale protests that took place the week ending June 6 -- the U.S. housing market continues to recover even in cities experiencing civil unrest. The proprietary index leverages a weighted average of realtor.com® search traffic, median list prices, new listings, and median time on market and compares it to the January 2020 market trend, as a baseline for pre-COVID market growth. The overall index is set to 100 in this baseline period. The higher a market's index value, the higher its recovery and vice versa. For the week ending June 6, the realtor.com® Housing Market Recovery Index was 88.8 nationwide, 11.2 points below the January baseline and up 1.0 point over the prior week. The slight increase in this week's overall index represents a 5.7 point increase over the 83.1 low point in the index, which occurred during week ending May 2. "By combining online search activity along with price and supply dynamics, the index functions as a robust leading indicator of housing activity, and a symptom gauge as we move toward healthier market conditions," Javier Vivas, director of economic research for realtor.com®. This week's index reading also reveals the recovery trend was not impacted in the 11 markets that saw the largest number of protests the week ending June 6. On average, these markets saw their recovery index increase 0.7 points over the prior week, ending May 30. When compared to other similar sized markets with reportedly less civil unrest, there was no evidence that the protests had an impact on housing recovery. Of the 11 markets, 6 areas saw slight increases in their weekly recovery index: Atlanta (+1.5 points) Chicago (+4.7 points) Cleveland (+3.3 points) Los Angeles (+0.2 points) Minneapolis (+0.3 points) New York (+4.9 points) Five saw a slight decrease in their weekly recovery index: Dallas (-2.0 points) Louisville, Ky (-2.1 points) Raleigh (-0.7 points) St. Louis (-0.9 points) Washington, D.C. (-1.1 points). Key Housing Metrics for the Week Ending June 6:   "The general sentiment from consumer surveys is that now is not a good time to sell a home because of COVID, economic uncertainty, and social unrest, but the data is saying the opposite," said Danielle Hale, chief economist for realtor.com. "Home prices are back to their pre-COVID pace and we're seeing listings spend slightly less time on the market than last week. But the housing market still needs more sellers in order to meet the surge in demand. Looking forward, if we don't get the inventory we need, we'll see prices rise even more and homes sell faster later this summer." New listings: Nationwide, the size of declines held mostly steady this week, dropping 21 percent over last year, which is a slight improvement over last week and a significant improvement when compared to early May's 30 percent declines year-over-year. This week's index shows new listings are 12.7 points below their January recovery baseline. Sellers have started June on the right foot, and the following weeks will indicate whether there will be enough supply to boost home sales this summer, nationwide and in all large markets. The continued declines in newly listed properties mean the full wave of spring sellers has yet to return to the market. However, recovery could be on the horizon as more than half (56 of 99) of large metros continue to see smaller declines this week, including New York, Boston and San Francisco. Asking prices: Price gains fully caught up to pre-COVID pace increasing 4.3 percent in the week ending June 6, compared to 4.4 percent the first two weeks of March. This week's index shows home prices are 0.7 points above the January recovery baseline. The mix of homes for-sale has reverted back toward pricier properties, and demand for entry-level properties has been reignited. Price gains have accelerated rapidly in recent weeks with inventory on the decline and buyer interest on the rise. Locally, 89 of 100 metros saw asking prices increase over last year. Total Active Listings: Sellers are still playing catch up during what's normally the busiest part of the season, and the availability of homes for sale remains well below seasonal levels. Total active listings declined 25 percent compared to a year ago as the lack of sellers is currently outweighing the extra time homes spend on the market. Signs, such as improved home purchase sentiment over last month, are pointing to rising home buyer interest and seller confidence, setting up a pick-up in sales activity in the summer months. Time on market: While homes are still sitting more than two weeks longer on the market than this time last year, this week's data shows the trend may be reverting back toward recovery. The week ending June 6 saw the first weekly decline in time on market since mid-March, with days on market one day faster than last week. It could still take a few more weeks for time on market to reach pre-COVID levels, since the pace of sales component of the recovery index remains 30.1 points below the January recovery baseline, but this week's data shows the first, important step toward recovery. For more information about the index report, please visit: https://www.realtor.com/research/housing-market-recovery-index/ For the latest weekly housing trends and index data, please visit: Index Housing trends About realtor.com® Realtor.com® makes buying, selling and living in homes easier and more rewarding for everyone. Realtor.com® pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today through its website and mobile apps is a trusted source for the information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. Using proprietary data science and machine learning technology, realtor.com® pairs buyers and sellers with local agents in their market, helping take the guesswork out of buying and selling a home. For professionals, realtor.com® is a trusted provider of consumer connections and branding solutions that help them succeed in today's on-demand world. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com.
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Key Housing Indicators Begin to Turn Around in May
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Unprecedented Turnaround in Home Showing Activity Seen in April and May as Agents, Buyers and Sellers Adjust to Virtual Showings
Showing Traffic Matches Prior-Year Levels in Many Markets According to Latest ShowingTime Data; Tech-Facilitated Showings, Loosening of Stay-at-Home Restrictions Account for Improvements May 21, 2020 - Showing activity continued an impressive turnaround after an historic spring collapse, led in part by loosening restrictions and increased adoption of virtual showing technology, according to data from ShowingTime. In early April, 42 states had issued stay-at-home orders, though by mid-May, the number of states where only essential businesses were permitted to remain open had dropped to 21. The Department of Homeland Security lists real estate as an essential service, though local guidelines take precedence. "The beginning of April marked the absolute bottom of per capita real estate activity since the Great Depression as three-quarters of buyer traffic evaporated, yet that was immediately followed by an unprecedented turnaround," said ShowingTime Chief Analytics Officer Daniil Cherkasskiy. "We've seen a significant rebound in May as rapidly returning buyer traffic concentrates on the subdued levels of inventory." The data also show that listings that have gone under contract since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic have required 40 percent fewer showings. "The probability of going under contract for listings coming on the market has been remarkably stable after the first week of April," Cherkasskiy said. "This suggests that buyers who were still trying to see homes in April were, on average, more determined to complete the transaction." The upswing in showing activity correlates with an increasing rate of adoption of technology, with more and more agents conducting showings virtually. Since introducing a "virtual showing" option within its showing management products in early April, ShowingTime has seen tens of thousands of showings conducted exclusively online. ShowingTime also introduced ShowingTime LIVE, an all-in-one showing and video platform that enables agents and their buyers to use ShowingTime's mobile app for live, one-on-one interactive video showings. ShowingTime LIVE is currently available in select markets, and will be available throughout the U.S. and Canada in June. "We're continuing to see great resilience in the industry, which can be attributed to agents' willingness to expand their view of how showings can be conducted," said ShowingTime President Michael Lane. "The data we're seeing indicate an impressive rate of adoption of virtual showings. With the introduction of ShowingTime LIVE, we're able to help agents get buyers into properties in a safe manner." In Michigan, state officials updated their guidance on May 7 and declared real estate an essential business. As a result, the state's showing activity jumped dramatically, recovering to a normal springtime run-rate in just eight days. It could signal how other states will fare following similar actions and loosening of restrictions. As anticipated, Showing Index® data in April revealed flagging activity on a year-over-year basis. Nationally, showing activity dropped 42.1 percent year over year in April, with the Northeast Region's 51.2 percent fall the most significant of all four regions. The Midwest's 41.4 percent year-over-year dip came next, followed by a 36.7 percent decline in activity in the West. The South's 33.6 percent fall in activity rounded out the year-over-year decreases in buyer traffic. The ShowingTime Showing Index, the first of its kind in the residential real estate industry, is compiled using data from property showings scheduled across the country on listings using ShowingTime products and services, providing a benchmark to track buyer demand. ShowingTime facilitates more than five million showings each month. Released monthly, the Showing Index tracks the average number of appointments received on active listings during the month. Local MLS indices are also available for select markets and are distributed to MLS and association leadership. To view the full report, visit showingtime.com/showingtime-showing-index/ About ShowingTime ShowingTime is the residential real estate industry's leading showing management and market stats technology provider, with more than 1.2 million active listings subscribed to its services. Its showing products and services simplify the appointment scheduling process for real estate professionals, buyers and sellers, resulting in more showings, more feedback and more efficient sales. Its MarketStats division provides interactive tools and easy-to-read market reports for MLSs, associations, brokers, agents and other real estate companies, as well as a recruiting tool for brokers. ShowingTime products are used in 370 MLSs representing one million real estate professionals across the U.S. and Canada. For more information, contact us at [email protected]
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New Listings Fall Nearly 45 Percent in April as Coronavirus Keeps Sellers on the Sidelines
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Realtor.com Connects Homeowners with Options to Sell Now, Move Later
Realtor.com users can now evaluate EasyKnock options to access their house value while remaining in their home during uncertain times SANTA CLARA, Calif., April 23, 2020 -- The COVID-19 crisis has prompted the need for 9 percent of consumers to unexpectedly move to a new home within the next six months, according to a recent consumer survey from realtor.com. In an effort to provide more flexibility to consumers impacted by the crisis, realtor.com is working with EasyKnock, a provider of "sell now, move later" options which enable consumers to access the value of their home without having to move right away. As part of this solution, realtor.com® users will be able to quickly determine their eligibility for, and likely proceeds from, two EasyKnock programs -- Sell and Stay and MoveAbility. Sell and Stay offers longer term lease options and the opportunity to buy back the home, while MoveAbility is aimed at homeowners who would like to move but haven't found their new home yet. Through the programs, EasyKnock purchases the home for the full appraised value with a combination of cash and an option, and closes on average within 21 days. Homeowners can choose to rent the home back for as long as they'd like. When the time comes, the consumer gives EasyKnock the go-ahead to sell the home on the open market and can receive any additional proceeds when the sale closes. "The COVID-19 crisis has had a profound impact on the job market which may lead some families to make extremely difficult decisions," said Todd Callow, vice president, product management, realtor.com®. "As part of our mission to provide consumers with all of the available information to help make informed decisions, realtor.com® will inform consumers about EasyKnock's options so they can determine if the programs are a good fit for their financial and housing needs." Realtor.com® has launched a dedicated site with information, resources and tools to help consumers navigate these uncertain times. Additionally, realtor.com® has made a series of product updates to help consumers get as much information and detail as possible about a property without physically visiting. This includes more 3D tours, video chats and access to Livestream Open Houses. To learn more, go to https://www.realtor.com/covid-19/ About realtor.com® Realtor.com® makes buying, selling and living in homes easier and more rewarding for everyone. Realtor.com® pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today through its website and mobile apps is a trusted source for the information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. Using proprietary data science and machine learning technology, realtor.com® pairs buyers and sellers with local agents in their market, helping take the guesswork out of buying and selling a home. For professionals, realtor.com® is a trusted provider of consumer connections and branding solutions that help them succeed in today's on-demand world. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com.
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March Housing Trends Provide First Glimpse of COVID-19 Impact on U.S. Housing Market
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Showing Activity Down 38-45 Percent in Past Two Weeks Due to COVID-19
The Pandemic"s Daily Impact on Buyer Traffic is Being Felt on Both the National and State/Province Levels, Though "Virtual" Showings are Being Scheduled Through ShowingTime"s Systems March 24, 2020 - As the world comes to grips with the impact of COVID-19, so too has the residential real estate industry, with showings off as much as 45 percent in some North American markets vs. the pace from two weeks ago, according to data obtained by ShowingTime. Data aggregated from the five million showings scheduled through ShowingTime's systems each month reveals that buyer interest – which has been higher for the past seven months compared with 2019 – remains intact, but showings have plateaued as more states issue statements asking residents to shelter in place to slow the spread of the virus. "ShowingTime is dedicated to helping our clients and the communities they serve ease the burden brought on by the pandemic by giving them accurate, reliable data that they can use to help with their home buying and selling decisions," said ShowingTime President Michael Lane. "We are committed to working with our clients to help them do their jobs in a safe, productive manner." To monitor daily showing traffic vs. the same period in 2019, ShowingTime has posted charts on its website that shows buyer activity across North America, along with traffic in individual states, to provide insight on the pandemic's impact. The data points in the charts represent a rolling weekly average in 100 markets that each record tens of thousands of appointments each month. "If we look at the magnitude of the slowdown across different price ranges, homes in the $300K range saw 35-45 percent declines in showing traffic over the last two weeks, while homes above $500K are still being shown, but the temporary declines are in the 50-60 percent range," said ShowingTime Chief Analytics Officer Daniil Cherkasskiy. The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic follows a February that marked the seventh consecutive month of nationwide growth in buyer activity with the nation's 14.8 percent rise, according to the latest ShowingTime Showing Index® report. The West Region saw the most notable gain, with a 25.2 percent year-over-year increase in traffic, followed closely by the South's 21.4 percent increase. The Northeast's 13.4 percent increase and the Midwest's 9.9 percent uptick rounded out the regional improvement in buyer activity. "As communities continue to respond to COVID-19, we will continue seeing expected declines in showing activity in most markets, particularly in those that felt the greatest impact in the 2008 housing crash," said Cherkasskiy. "Whether or not these drops will be sustained will become clearer as additional data are made available. We will continue to monitor the situation and provide the latest data on our website." The ShowingTime Showing Index, the first of its kind in the residential real estate industry, is compiled using data from property showings scheduled across the country on listings using ShowingTime products and services, providing a benchmark to track buyer demand. ShowingTime facilitates more than five million showings each month. Released monthly, the Showing Index tracks the average number of appointments received on active listings during the month. Local MLS indices are also available for select markets and are distributed to MLS and association leadership. To view the full report, visit showingtime.com/showingtime-showing-index/ About ShowingTime ShowingTime is the residential real estate industry's leading showing management and market stats technology provider, with more than 1.2 million active listings subscribed to its services. Its showing products and services simplify the appointment scheduling process for real estate professionals, buyers and sellers, resulting in more showings, more feedback and more efficient sales. Its MarketStats division provides interactive tools and easy-to-read market reports for MLSs, associations, brokers and other real estate companies, as well as a recruiting tool for brokers. ShowingTime products are used in 370 MLSs representing nearly one million real estate professionals across the U.S. and Canada. For more information, contact us at [email protected]
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Buying, Selling or Just Curious: Realtor.com Helps You Determine What a Home is Worth
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2020 Home Showing Traffic Begins Where 2019 Left Off with Sixth Consecutive Month of Nationwide Year-Over-Year Improvement
National Growth in Buyer Foot Traffic Largest in the History of the Showing Index® February 21, 2020 -- The chill of winter's first full month failed to cool home buyer activity, as January showing traffic saw significant year-over-year increases across all regions throughout the U.S., according to the latest ShowingTime Showing Index report. The 20.2 percent year-over-year jump in national showing traffic in January was the most significant recorded in the history of the Showing Index. The West again topped regional growth last month, with a 34.1 percent increase compared to January 2019. The South and Northeast reported similar gains in buyer traffic, at 21.6 percent and 20.6 percent, respectively. The Midwest's 15.7 percent year-over-year increase rounded out the regional gains in January. "We continue to see substantial increases in buyer traffic," said ShowingTime Chief Analytics Officer Daniil Cherkasskiy. "While only a portion of the markets showed spikes in November - December 2019, showing traffic increased across the board for almost all markets in January. "It's important to note that January 2019 traffic was somewhat subdued due to extreme weather conditions in parts of the country at the time, reflecting an exaggerated year-over-year growth for January 2020," he added. "Even so, the number of appointments per listing have gone up to record levels based on activity we see in our systems, suggesting that the housing market will be quite competitive this spring." The ShowingTime Showing Index, the first of its kind in the residential real estate industry, is compiled using data from property showings scheduled across the country on listings using ShowingTime products and services, providing a benchmark to track buyer demand. ShowingTime facilitates more than five million showings each month. Released monthly, the Showing Index tracks the average number of appointments received on active listings during the month. Local MLS indices are also available for select markets and are distributed to MLS and association leadership. To view the full report, visit showingtime.com/showingtime-showing-index/. About ShowingTime ShowingTime is the residential real estate industry's leading showing management and market stats technology provider, with more than 1.2 million active listings subscribed to its services. Its showing products and services simplify the appointment scheduling process for real estate professionals, buyers and sellers, resulting in more showings, more feedback and more efficient sales. Its MarketStats division provides interactive tools and easy-to-read market reports for MLSs, associations, brokers and other real estate companies, as well as a recruiting tool for brokers. ShowingTime products are used in 370 MLSs representing nearly one million real estate professionals across the U.S. and Canada. For more information, contact us at [email protected]
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CoreLogic Reports U.S. Overall Delinquency Rate Lowest for a November in at Least 20 Years
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U.S. Housing Supply Reaches New Low
Inventory continued to fall and prices rose in January setting the stage for a competitive homebuying season SANTA CLARA, Calif., Feb. 7, 2020 -- National housing inventory declined 13.6 percent in January, the steepest year-over-year decrease in more than 4 years, pushing the supply of for sale homes in the U.S. to its lowest level since realtor.com® began tracking the data in 2012, according to the website's January Monthly Housing Trends Report released today. Based on realtor.com®'s analysis, January's steep year-over-year decline amounted to a national loss of 164,000 listings, tightening the grip of the housing shortage plaguing the U.S. Based on realtor.com® data, it shows no signs of easing in the near future as the volume of newly listed properties also declined by 10.6 percent since last year. "Homebuyers took advantage of low mortgage rates and stable listing prices to drive sales higher at the end of 2019, further depleting the already limited inventory of homes for sale. With fewer homes coming up for sale, we've hit another new low of for sale-listings in January," according to Danielle Hale, realtor.com®'s chief economist. "This is a challenging sign for the large numbers of Millennial and Gen Z buyers coming into the housing market this homebuying season as it implies the potential for rising prices and fast-selling homes—a competitive market. In fact, markets such as San Jose in Northern California, which saw inventory down nearly 40 percent last month, are also seeing prices grow by 10 percent while homes are selling at a blistering pace of 51 days." The supply shortage is found at every price tier throughout the U.S., but it is especially pronounced at the entry-level. In January, properties priced under $200,000 declined by 19 percent, an acceleration compared to December's decline of 18.1 percent. The decline in inventory of mid-tier properties priced between $200,000 and $750,000 also accelerated, to a decline of 12 percent year-over-year, compared to December's 10.2 percent decline. Even upper-tier properties priced at more than $750,000 declined by 5.9 percent year-over-year compared to December's decline of 4.4 percent. As inventory reached its lowest point on record, both listing prices and days on market reacted to the imbalance of supply and demand. The median U.S. listing price grew by 3.4 percent year-over-year, to $299,995 in January, while prices in 18 metros grew by more than 10 percent. Of the 50 largest metros, 46 saw year-over-year gains in median listing prices, with Philadelphia as the nation's standout with a 16.0 percent increase over last year. Additionally, with the lack of supply, homes are selling in an average of 86 days, two days more quickly than January of last year. Where Housing Supply Changed the Most The metros which saw the largest declines in housing inventory were San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, Calif. (-37.3 percent); Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Ariz. (-35.4 percent); and San Diego-Carlsbad, Calif. (-34.0 percent). Other markets across the country where housing supply had sharp declines included Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colo. (-28.8 percent); Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, Pa.-N.J.-Del.-Md. (-27.8 percent); and Cincinnati, Ohio-Ky.-Ind. (-24.4 percent). Only two of the 50 largest metros saw inventory increase year-over-year: Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minn.-Wis. (+9.4 percent); and San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas (+8.4 percent). Where Prices Changed the Most Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, Pa.-N.J.-Del.-Md. (+16.0 percent); Rochester, N.Y. (+15.0 percent); and Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, Ariz. (+14.5 percent) posted the highest year-over-year median list price growth in January. Other markets across the country where housing prices shot up included Memphis, Tenn.-Miss.-Ark. (+13.7 percent); and Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Ind. (+12.9 percent). The steepest price declines were seen in Louisville/Jefferson County, Ky.-Ind. (-4.0 percent); Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minn.-Wis. (-2.0 percent); and Houston-The Woodlands-Sugarland, Texas (-1.9 percent). However, each of these markets saw yearly price declines decelerate compared to December. Where Days on Market Changed the Most Hartford-West Hartford-East Hartford, Conn.; Raleigh, N.C.; and Oklahoma City, Okla.; saw the largest decreases in days on market with properties spending 13, 13, and 12 fewer days on the market than last year, respectively. Other markets across the country where houses sold faster than last year included Austin-Round Rock, Texas (-9 days); Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minn.-Wis. (-6 days); and Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, Fla. (-6 days). Meanwhile, properties in Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, Nev.; Boston-Cambridge-Newton, Mass.-N.H.; and Detroit-Warren-Dearborn, Mich. sold 7, 7, and 6 days more slowly, respectively. Metros Seeing the Largest Declines in Inventory About realtor.com® Realtor.com® makes buying, selling and living in homes easier and more rewarding for everyone. Realtor.com® pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today through its website and mobile apps is a trusted source for the information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. Using proprietary data science and machine learning technology, realtor.com® pairs buyers and sellers with local agents in their market, helping take the guesswork out of buying and selling a home. For professionals, realtor.com® is a trusted provider of consumer connections and branding solutions that help them succeed in today's on-demand world. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com.
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CoreLogic Reports December Home Prices Increased by 4% Year Over Year
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Pending Home Sales Skid 4.9% in December
WASHINGTON (January 29, 2020) -- Pending home sales fell in December, taking a step back after increasing slightly in November, according to the National Association of Realtors. Each of the four major regions reported a drop in month-over-month contract activity, with the South experiencing the steepest fall. However, year-over-year pending home sales activity was up nationally compared to one year ago. The Pending Home Sales Index (PHSI), a forward-looking indicator based on contract signings, fell 4.9% to 103.2 in December. Year-over-year contract signings increased 4.6%. An index of 100 is equal to the level of contract activity in 2001. "Mortgage rates are expected to hold under 4% for most of 2020, while net job creation will likely exceed two million," said Lawrence Yun, NAR's chief economist. While he noted that these factors are promising for the housing market, Yun cautioned that low inventory remains a significant longer-term concern. "Due to the shortage of affordable homes, home sales growth will only rise by around 3%," Yun predicted. "Still, national median home price growth is in no danger of falling due to inventory shortages and will rise by 4%. The new home construction market also looks brighter, with housing starts and new home sales set to rise 6% and 10%, respectively." Pointing to data from active listings at realtor.com®, Yun says the markets where listing prices are around $250,000 – an affordable price point in most markets nationally – are drawing some of the most significant buyer attention, including Fort Wayne, Ind., Burlington, N.C., Topeka, Kan., Pueblo, Colo., and Columbus, Ohio. "The state of housing in 2020 will depend on whether home builders bring more affordable homes to the market," Yun said. "Home prices and even rents are increasing too rapidly, and more inventory would help correct the problem and slow price gains." December Pending Home Sales Regional Breakdown All regional indices were down in December. The Northeast PHSI slipped 4.0% to 92.4 in December, 0.1% lower than a year ago. In the Midwest, the index dropped 3.6% to 98.8 last month, 1.3% higher than in December 2018. Pending home sales in the South decreased 5.5% to an index of 118.1 in December, a 7.4% increase from December 2018. The index in the West fell 5.4% in December 2019 to 93.1, an increase of 7.0% from a year ago. The National Association of Realtors® is America's largest trade association, representing more than 1.4 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.
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The Gap Between Buying and Renting Narrows Nationwide
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Average U.S. Home Seller Profits Hit $65,500 in 2019, Another New High
Median Home Sales Prices Reach Record High of $258,000 in 2019; Homeowners Staying Put Longer as Average Homeownership Tenure Rises to New High IRVINE, Calif. - Jan. 23, 2020 -- ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database and first property data provider of Data-as-a-Service (DaaS), today released its Year-End 2019 U.S. Home Sales Report, which shows that home sellers nationwide in 2019 realized a home price gain of $65,500 on the typical sale, up from $58,100 last year and up from $50,027 two years ago. The latest profit figure, based on median purchase and resale prices, marked the highest level in the United States since 2006 – a 13-year high. That $65,500 typical home seller profit represented a 34 percent return on investment compared to the original purchase price, up from 31.4 percent last year and up from 27.4 percent in 2017, to the highest average home-seller ROI since 2006. Both raw profits and ROI have improved nationwide for eight straight years. However, last year's gain in ROI – up less than three percentage points – was the smallest since 2011. "The nation's housing boom kept roaring along in 2019 as prices hit a new record, returning ever-higher profits to home sellers and posing ever-greater challenges for buyers seeking bargains. In short, it was a great year to be a seller," said Todd Teta, chief product officer at ATTOM Data Solutions. "But there were signs that the market was losing some steam last year, as profits and profit margins increased at the slowest pace since 2011. While low mortgage rates are propping up prices, the declining progress suggests some uncertainty going into the 2020 buying season." Among 220 metropolitan statistical areas with a population greater than 200,000 and sufficient historical sales data, those in western states continued to reap the highest returns on investments, with concentrations on or near the west coast. Metro areas with the highest home seller ROIs were in San Jose, CA (82.8 percent); San Francisco, CA (72.8 percent); Seattle, WA (65.6 percent); Merced, CA (63.2 percent) and Salem, OR (62.1 percent). The top four in 2019 were the same areas that topped the list in 2018. Historical U.S. Home Seller Gains South Bend and Boise lead major metros in home price appreciation The U.S. median home price increased 6.2 percent in 2019, hitting an all-time high of $258,000. The annual home-price appreciation in 2019 topped the 4.5 percent rise in 2018 compared to 2017, but was down from the 7.1 percent increase in 2017 compared to 2016. Among 134 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of 200,000 or more and sufficient home price data, those with the biggest year-over-year increases in median home prices were South Bend, IN (up 18.4 percent); Boise City, ID (up 12.6 percent); Spokane, WA (up 10.9 percent); Atlantic City, NJ (up 10.6 percent) and Salt Lake City, UT (up 9.6 percent). Along with Salt Lake City, other major metro areas with a population of at least 1 million and at least an 8 percent annual increase in home prices in 2019 were Grand Rapids, MI (up 8.9 percent) and Columbus, OH (up 8.3 percent). Home prices in 2019 reached new peaks in 105 of the 134 metros (78 percent), including Los Angeles, Dallas-Fort Worth, Houston, Washington, D.C., and Philadelphia. Homeownership tenure at new record high nationwide, but down in many areas Homeowners who sold in the fourth quarter of 2019 had owned their homes an average of 8.21 years, up from 8.08 years in the previous quarter and up from 7.95 years in the fourth quarter of 2018. The latest figure represented the longest average home seller tenure since the first quarter of 2000, the earliest period in which data is available. Among 108 metro areas with a population of at least 200,000 and sufficient data, the top five tenures for home sellers in the fourth quarter of 2019 were all in Connecticut: Norwich, CT (13.49 years); New Haven, CT (13.32 years) Bridgeport-Stamford, CT (13.23 years); Torrington, CT (12.33 years) and Hartford, CT (12.25 years). Average U.S. Homeownership Tenure Counter to the national trend, 45 of the 108 metro areas (42 percent) posted a year-over-year decrease in average home-seller tenure, including Colorado Springs, CO (down 9 percent); Modesto, CA (down 7 percent); Visalia, CA (down 5 percent); Oklahoma City, OK (down 5 percent) and Olympia, WA (down 5 percent). A quarter of home buyers made all-cash purchases in 2019 Nationwide, all-cash purchases accounted for 25.3 percent of single-family home and condo sales in 2019, the lowest level since 2007. The latest figure was down from 27.0 percent in 2018 and 27.7 percent in 2017, and well off the 38.4 percent peaks in 2011 and 2012. However, this is still well above the pre-recession average of 18.7 percent between 2000 and 2007. Among 166 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000 and sufficient cash-sales data, those where cash sales represented the largest share of all transactions in 2019 were Macon, GA (51.1 percent of sales); Naples, FL (50.4 percent); Chico, CA (47.9 percent); Montgomery, AL (44.7 percent) and Fort Smith, OK (43.8 percent). U.S. distressed sales share drops to 13-year low, but rises in eight states Distressed home sales — including bank-owned (REO) sales, third-party foreclosure auction sales, and short sales — accounted for 11.5 percent of all U.S. single family home and condo sales in 2019, down from 12.4 percent in 2018 and from a peak of 38.8 percent in 2011. The latest figure marked the lowest point since 2006. States where distressed sales comprised the largest portion of total sales in 2019 were all in the Northeast or Mid-Atlantic regions: New Jersey (20.1 percent of sales), Connecticut (19.5 percent), Delaware (19.4 percent), Maryland (18.1 percent) and Rhode Island (17.6 percent). Among 204 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000 and with sufficient data, those where distressed sales represented the largest portion of all sales in 2019 were Atlantic City, NJ (26.9 percent of sales); Columbus, GA (22.6 percent); Trenton, NJ (22.1 percent); Norwich, CT (21.6 percent) and Peoria, IL (20.0 percent). Those with the smallest shares were Portland, ME (3.3 percent of sales); Ogden, UT (3.8 percent); Provo, UT (4.1 percent); Salt Lake City, UT (4.6 percent) and San Francisco, CA (4.6 percent). Among 53 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 1 million, those with the highest levels of distressed sales in 2019 were Baltimore, MD (19.3 percent of sales); Hartford, CT (18.9 percent); Philadelphia, PA (18.1 percent); Cleveland, OH (17.9 percent) and Providence, RI (17.7 percent). Aside from San Francisco and Salt Lake City, metros with at least 1 million people that had the lowest shares, were San Jose, CA (5.2 percent of sales); Austin, TX (5.7 percent) and Grand Rapids, MI (6.2 percent). U.S. Total Distressed Sales Institutional investors dropped for the third straight year Institutional investors nationwide accounted for 2.9 percent of all single-family home and condo sales in 2019, down from 3.0 percent in 2018 to the lowest point since 2015. Among 120 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000 and sufficient institutional-investor sales data, those with the highest levels of institutional-investor transactions in 2019 were Atlanta, GA (9.5 percent of sales); Charlotte, NC (8.6 percent); Lafayette, LA (8.4 percent); Memphis, TN (8.3 percent) and Raleigh, NC (7.8 percent). Historical U.S. Home Sales By Type Texas metro areas continue to dominate list with the highest levels of FHA loans Nationwide, buyers using Federal Housing Administration (FHA) loans accounted for 11.9 percent of all single-family home and condo purchases in 2019, up from 10.6 percent in 2018. The increase marked the first rise since 2015. Among 197 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000 and sufficient FHA- buyer data, the top four with the highest share of purchases made with FHA loans were in Texas. Those with the highest levels of FHA buyers in 2019 were McAllen, TX (30.4 percent of sales); El Paso, TX (26 percent); Amarillo, TX (24.4 percent); Beaumont-Port Arthur, TX (23.7 percent) and Visalia, CA (23.5 percent). The four Texas metros were the same that led the list in 2018. About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, property data APIs, real estate market trends, marketing lists, match & append and introducing the first property data deliver solution, a cloud-based data platform that streamlines data management – Data-as-a-Service (DaaS).
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2019 Ends on a High Note for Home Buyer Activity as December Showings See Fifth Consecutive Month of Year-Over-Year Growth
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Existing-Home Sales Climb 3.6% in December
WASHINGTON (January 22, 2020) -- Existing-home sales grew in December, bouncing back after a slight fall in November, according to the National Association of Realtors. Although the Midwest saw sales decline, the other three major U.S. regions reported meaningful growth last month. Total existing-home sales, completed transactions that include single-family homes, townhomes, condominiums and co-ops, increased 3.6% from November to a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 5.54 million in December. Additionally, overall sales took a significant bounce, up 10.8% from a year ago (5.00 million in December 2018). On a full-year basis, total existing-home sales ended at 5.34 million, the same level as in 2018, as sales in the South region (+2.2%) offset declines in the West (-1.8%) and Midwest (-1.6%), as the Northeast remained unchanged. Lawrence Yun, NAR's chief economist, said home sales fluctuated a great deal last year. "I view 2019 as a neutral year for housing in terms of sales," Yun said. "Home sellers are positioned well, but prospective buyers aren't as fortunate. Low inventory remains a problem, with first-time buyers affected the most." The median existing-home price for all housing types in December was $274,500, up 7.8% from December 2018 ($254,700), as prices rose in every region. November's price increase marks 94 straight months of year-over-year gains. "Price appreciation has rapidly accelerated, and areas that are relatively unaffordable or declining in affordability are starting to experience slower job growth," Yun said. "The hope is for price appreciation to slow in line with wage growth, which is about 3%." NAR's Home Affordability Index Ranking and Payroll Job Growth report found that affordability rankings declined in 81 metro areas, 34 of which saw non-farm job growth fall faster in 2019 Q3 than the national rate over the previous five years. Total housing inventory at the end of December totaled 1.40 million units, down 14.6% from November and 8.5% from one year ago (1.53 million). Unsold inventory sits at a 3.0-month supply at the current sales pace, down from the 3.7-month figure recorded in both November and December 2018. Unsold inventory totals have dropped for seven consecutive months from year-ago levels, taking a toll on home sales. Properties typically remained on the market for 41 days in December, seasonally up from 38 days in November, but down from 46 days in December 2018. Forty-three percent of homes sold in December 2019 were on the market for less than a month. First-time buyers were responsible for 31% of sales in December, moderately down from the 32% seen in both November and in December 2018. NAR's 2019 Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers – released in late 2019 – revealed that the annual share of first-time buyers was 33%. Individual investors or second-home buyers, who account for many cash sales, purchased 17% of homes in December 2019, up from both 16% in November and 15% in December 2018. All-cash sales accounted for 20% of transactions in December, unchanged from November and down slightly from 22% in December 2018. Distressed sales – foreclosures and short sales – represented 2% of sales in December, unchanged from both November 2019 and December 2018. Yun said conditions for buying are favorable and will likely continue in 2020. "We saw the year come to a close with the economy churning out 2.3 million jobs, mortgage rates below 4% and housing starts ramp up to 1.6 million on an annual basis," he said. "If these factors are sustained in 2020, we will see a notable pickup in home sales in 2020." According to Freddie Mac, the average commitment rate for a 30-year, conventional, fixed-rate mortgage increased to 3.72% in December, up from 3.70% in November. The average commitment rate across all of 2019 was 3.94%. "NAR is expecting 2020 to be a great year for housing," said NAR President Vince Malta, broker at Malta & Co., Inc., in San Francisco, California. "Our leadership team is hard at work to secure policies that will keep our housing market moving in the right direction, like promoting infrastructure reform, strengthening fair housing protections and ensuring mortgage capital remains available to responsible, mortgage-ready Americans. Single-family and Condo/Co-op Sales Single-family home sales sat at a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 4.92 million in December, up from 4.79 million in November, and up 10.6% from a year ago. The median existing single-family home price was $276,900 in December 2019, up 8.0% from December 2018. Existing condominium and co-op sales were recorded at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 620,000 units in December, up 10.7% from November and 12.7% higher than a year ago. The median existing condo price was $255,400 in December, which is an increase of 6.0% from a year ago. Regional Breakdown Compared to last month, December sales increased in the Northeast, South and West regions, while year-over-year sales are up in each of the four regions. Median home prices in all regions increased from one year ago, with the Midwest region showing the strongest price gain. December 2019 existing-home sales in the Northeast grew 5.7% to an annual rate of 740,000, up 8.8% from a year ago. The median price in the Northeast was $304,400, up 7.4% from December 2018. Existing-home sales decreased 1.5% in the Midwest to an annual rate of 1.30 million, which is up 9.2% from a year ago. The median price in the Midwest was $208,500, a 9.2% jump from last December. Existing-home sales in the South grew 5.4% to an annual rate of 2.36 million in December, up 12.4% from a year ago. The median price in the South was $240,500, a 6.7% increase from this time last year. Existing-home sales in the West rose 4.6% to an annual rate of 1.14 million in December, a 10.7% increase from a year ago. The median price in the West was $411,800, up 8.1% from December 2018. The National Association of Realtors® is America's largest trade association, representing more than 1.4 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.
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CoreLogic Reports U.S. Overall Delinquency Rate Lowest for an October in at Least 20 Years
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Redfin Report: Bidding War Rate Fell to Another 10-Year Low in December
Fewer than 1 in 10 homebuying offers faced competition SEATTLE, Jan. 8, 2020 -- Just 9% of offers written by Redfin agents on behalf of their homebuying customers faced a bidding war nationwide in December, down from 12% a year earlier and setting another new 10-year low, according to a new report from Redfin. The rate is likely to begin rising again early this year as the real estate market heats up in the spring. "Bidding war rates likely hit their true bottom in December," said Redfin chief economist Daryl Fairweather. "Amid the current global economic uncertainty, mortgage rates will remain low in the coming months, which will boost demand for homes in 2020. That means more buyers competing against each other and bidding up prices." As in November, San Francisco was the only market even moderately competitive in December. The bidding war rate there in December was 26%, down from 35% a year earlier and down from 28% in November. "There aren't typically very many homes for sale in San Francisco in December," said Redfin San Francisco Market Manager Saleem Buqeileh. "Last month we saw more buyers than usual out looking for a 'steal' and bidding on homes, which led to multiple offer situations on some homes where all of the buyers came in below list price, rather than above." Competition was still rare everywhere else in the country in December, with no other market experiencing a bidding war rate higher than 17%. The bidding war rate fell to zero in Raleigh and Dallas, and hit its lowest point in at least five years in Los Angeles. Aside from the zero rates in Raleigh and Dallas, Atlanta had the third-lowest bidding war rate in December at 4%. To read the full report, please visit: https://www.redfin.com/blog/december-2019-real-estate-bidding-wars. About Redfin Redfin is a technology-powered real estate brokerage, combining its own full-service agents with modern technology to redefine real estate in the consumer's favor. Founded by software engineers, Redfin has the country's #1 brokerage website and offers a host of online tools to consumers, including the Redfin Estimate, the automated home-value estimate with the industry's lowest published error rate for listed homes. Homebuyers and sellers enjoy a full-service, technology-powered experience from Redfin real estate agents, while saving thousands in commissions. Redfin serves more than 90 major metro areas across the U.S. and Canada. The company has helped customers buy or sell homes worth more than $85 billion.
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CoreLogic Reports November Home Prices Increased by 3.7% Year Over Year
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2020 Begins With Lowest Housing Inventory in Two Years
Price growth is accelerating faster than national average in markets with the largest inventory declines SANTA CLARA, Calif., Jan. 7, 2020 -- December saw the largest year-over-year decline of housing inventory in almost three years with a dramatic 12 percent decline, pushing the number of homes for sale in the U.S. to the lowest level since January 2018 according to the December 2019 Housing Trends report released today by realtor.com®. Based on realtor.com®'s analysis, the inventory decline is accelerating across all price levels, including the luxury market. In December, inventory of homes priced under $200,000 declined by 18.1 percent year-over-year, higher than the 16.5 percent drop in November. Mid-tier housing priced between $200,000 and $750,000 also declined at an accelerated pace, up 10.2 percent year-over-year compared to November's decline of 7.4 percent. Listings of homes priced over $1 million shrunk by 4.4 percent year-over-year, up from from nearly 2 percent in November. "The market is struggling with a large housing undersupply just as 4.8 million millennials are reaching 30-years of age in 2020, a prime age for many to purchase their first home," according to realtor.com Senior Economist, George Ratiu. "The significant inventory drop we saw in December is a harbinger of the continuing imbalance expected to plague this year's markets, as the number of homes for sale are poised to reach historically low levels." The inventory shortage gripping the U.S. housing market is showing no signs of slowing anytime soon. December's 12 percent year-over-year inventory decline is an acceleration from November's drop of 9.5 percent, and equates to a loss of nearly 155,000 listings compared to December 2018. Additionally, new listings are failing to restore the market to equilibrium as the volume of newly listed properties also declined by 11.2 percent year-over-year. On a local level, the tech havens of San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, Calif.; Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, Wash; and San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, Calif. all saw inventory declines of more than 30 percent in December as well as listing price growth above the national median. Only three of the 50 largest U.S. metros saw inventory increase over the year: San Antonio-New Braunfels, Texas (+8.8 percent); Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minn.-Wis. (+7.4 percent); and Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, Nev. (+4.8 percent), which all had year-over-year declines in their median listing prices. Overall, the median U.S. listing price grew by 3 percent, to $299,950 in December, which is a deceleration compared to last month, when the median listing price grew by 3.6 percent over the year. At the same time, price growth is continuing to heat up in metros where inventory declines were greatest in December. Of the 50 largest U.S. metros, 42 saw year-over-year gains in median listing prices, with 33 of the 50 growing faster than the national rate and 12 of those growing faster than December 2017's rate of 8.2 percent. Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, Calif. (+21.0 percent); Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, Pa.-N.J.-Del.-Md. (+13.1 percent); and Birmingham-Hoover, Ala. (+11.1 percent); posted the highest year-over-year median list price growth in December. All three markets also saw double-digit declines in their housing inventories. The steepest price declines were seen in Louisville/Jefferson County, Ky.-Ind. (-5.0 percent); Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, Minn.-Wis. (-4.1 percent); and Houston-The Woodlands-Sugarland, Texas (-2.9 percent). In December, 13.2 percent of active listings saw their listing prices reduced, virtually unchanged from a year ago. Among the nation's 50 largest metros, 15 saw an increase in their share of price reductions compared to this time last year. Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Ore.-Wash. saw the greatest increase in the share of price reductions in November, up 14.7 percent year-over-year. It was followed by Indianapolis-Carmel-Anderson, Ind. (+3.1 percent) and Houston-The Woodlands-Sugarland, Texas (+2.6 percent). Nationally, homes sold in 79 days in December 2019, two days more quickly than December 2018. However, in the 50 largest U.S. metros, the typical home sold at a nearly identical pace. Raleigh, N.C.; Oklahoma City, Okla.; and Rochester, N.Y.; saw the largest decreases in days on market with properties spending 13, 11, and 8 fewer days on the market than last year, respectively. Meanwhile, properties in Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, Calif.; Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, N.Y.; and Boston-Cambridge-Newton, Mass.-N.H.; sold 22, 10, and 9 days more slowly, respectively. About realtor.com® Realtor.com®, The Home of Home Search, offers the most MLS-listed for-sale listings among national real estate portals, and access to information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. Through its Opcity platform, realtor.com® uses data science and machine learning to connect consumers with a real estate professional based on their specific buying and selling needs. Realtor.com® pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today is a trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers by making all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com®.
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U.S. Home-Flipping Activity Drops as Returns Remain at Near Seven-Year Low
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Pending Home Sales Expand 1.2% in November
WASHINGTON (December 30, 2019) -- Pending home sales increased in November, rebounding from the prior month's decline, according to the National Association of Realtors. The West region reported the highest growth last month, while the other three major U.S. regions saw only marginal variances in month-over-month contract activity. Pending home sales were up nationally and up in all regions compared to one year ago. The Pending Home Sales Index (PHSI), a forward-looking indicator based on contract signings, rose 1.2% to 108.5 in November. Year-over-year contract signings jumped 7.4%. An index of 100 is equal to the level of contract activity in 2001. "Despite the insufficient level of inventory, pending home contracts still increased in November," said Lawrence Yun, NAR's chief economist, noting that housing inventory has been in decline for six straight months dating back to June 2019. "The favorable conditions are expected throughout 2020 as well, but supply is not yet meeting the healthy demand." At the recent NAR Real Estate Forecast Summit, the consensus forecast called for 2.0% GDP growth, a 3.7% unemployment rate and a 3.8% average mortgage rate in 2020. Home prices were projected to rise by 3.6% in 2020 after a 5% gain in 2019. "Sale prices continue to rise, but I am hopeful that we will see price appreciation slow in 2020," said Yun. "Builder confidence levels are high, so we just need housing supply to match and more home construction to take place in the coming year." November Pending Home Sales Regional Breakdown The regional indices had mixed results in November. The Northeast PHSI slid 0.1% to 96.3 in November, 2.6% higher than a year ago. In the Midwest, the index rose 1.0% to 102.5 last month, 5.0% higher than in November 2018. Pending home sales in the South decreased 0.2% to an index of 125.0 in November, a 7.7% increase from last November. The index in the West grew 5.5% in November 2019 to 98.4, an increase of 14.0% from a year ago. The National Association of Realtors® is America's largest trade association, representing more than 1.4 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.
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Existing-Home Sales Descend 1.7% in November
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Low Inventory Drives Home Buyers to Explore Big City Alternatives
Boise, Idaho, McAllen, Texas and Tucson, Ariz. top realtor.com's list of markets set to sizzle in 2020 SANTA CLARA, Calif., Dec. 12, 2019 -- While the U.S. housing market is expected to cool in 2020, certain markets will remain steadfast, fueled by strong local economies, job creation, and available inventory, especially at the entry-level price point. Topping next year's housing markets list are Boise, Idaho, McAllen, Texas, and Tucson, Ariz., according to realtor.com's analysis of the 100 largest metros released today. Based on realtor.com®'s analysis of projected home sales and price data, this year's list highlights the trend of people moving from expensive coastal cities to more affordable areas inland. In fact, nine out of 10 of 2020's hottest markets are not on the coast -- a significant change from last year when four out of 10 markets were on or near the water. This trend is particularly noticeable in Boise, which jumped from the No. 8 position last year to the top spot for 2020. Boise is seeing an influx of out-of-state buyers looking to enjoy the city's amenities at a lower price point compared with places such as California. In the top 10 markets, home sales are expected to increase by 2.4 percent and prices by 3.1 percent on average year-over-year. This is in contrast to a 1.8 percent decrease in home sales and a 0.8 percent increase in sales prices nationwide, according the realtor.com® 2020 housing forecast. Top 10 markets in 2020 Boise, Idaho McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas Tucson, Ariz. Chattanooga, Tenn. Columbia, S.C. Rochester, N.Y. Colorado Springs, Colo. Winston-Salem, N.C. Charleston-North Charleston, S.C. Memphis, Tenn. "Many of the markets on this year's list are late bloomers in the current housing cycle, meaning they still have plenty of inventory and prices are within reach -- a rare combination in recent years," said George Ratiu, senior economist, realtor.com®. "Additionally, a number of the top markets in 2020 are welcoming an influx of buyers from nearby large cities that have become crowded, expensive and lack sufficient inventory." Buyers have more choice With inventory at historically low levels nationwide, home ownership has become challenging, especially for first-time buyers. In fact, this year's list represents the nation's only markets which retain sufficient inventory, especially at the entry level price point. The search for affordability has attracted a large number of buyers into these markets, with active listings decreasing 11 percent year-over-year. However, in many of the top 10 markets, constricted supply is a relatively new issue and the total stock of inventory remains plentiful and in a good position to absorb growth. Sister cities Many of the markets on this year's list are smaller cities that are handling overflow from nearby larger cities that have become crowded and unaffordable. For example, Colorado Springs is becoming a respite from Denver's pricey housing market and Memphis and Chattanooga are affordable options for people looking for Nashville alternatives. University towns Interestingly, the majority of top markets are home to a college or university. This is likely due to the fact that many schools are creating incubators to nurture entrepreneurs and start-ups, helping to fuel local job markets. Rochester, N.Y., for example, is home to two large universities and is benefiting from this trend. Retirement boom Cities like Tucson, Ariz., Winston-Salem, N.C., Columbia, S.C. and Charleston, S.C. have become popular retirement destinations. Many baby boomers are looking to spend their golden years in a warmer climate and escape the high property tax rates that are common in the Northeast. Arizona, North Carolina and South Carolina do not tax Social Security retirement benefits, making these states attractive to older buyers. "As a whole, millennials are driving the housing market, but what's interesting in this year's list is that not all of our cities fall into that category. In fact, only half of this year's top 10 are millennial markets and the other half are being driven by retirees and mid-lifers leaving more expensive coastal cities," added Ratiu. 1. Boise, Idaho Median home price: $295,000 Home price change: +8.1 percent Sales change: +0.3 percent Combined sales and price growth: +8.4 percent Idaho's capital city has seen a boom in population over recent years, having nearly doubled in size since 1990. Many of the city's newcomers are transplants from more expensive coastal cities. Boise is home to a mild four-season climate with a vibrant community that actively takes advantage of the area's easy access to mountains, rivers, lakes and parks. A strong school system, thriving job market and top-notch healthcare draw a diverse crowd to Idaho's capital. A favorable tax structure -- which includes relatively low sales and property tax and no state Social Security tax -- as well as relatively affordable housing has made this area popular for retirees as well as young professionals. Boise is no stranger to realtor.com®'s Top Markets List, it was No. 8 in 2019. 2. McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas Median home price: $152,000 Home price change: +4.0 percent Sales change: +4.4 percent Combined sales and price growth: +8.4 percent Nestled along the Rio Grande and Mexico border in the southern tip of Texas sit the cities of McAllen, Edinburg and Mission. The area has a rich heritage which can be felt throughout and is home to the National Butterfly Center and annual Citrus Fiesta. Affordability is a main driver for many people moving to the area from other parts of Texas and the country -- in fact, McAllen is one of the most affordable markets in the country, with a median home price of just $152,000. Emerging job opportunities coupled with the fact that Texas does not have a state income tax is drawing many young professionals to the area. 3. Tucson, Ariz. Median home price: $230,000 Home price change: +3.3 percent Sales change: +3.4 percent Combined sales and price growth: +6.6 percent Many people are flocking to Tucson, which boasts warm temperatures and 286 days of sunshine each year. The sun-baked city is one of the most popular retirement destinations in the country, however, it is also drawing the younger generation, as the city is home to The University of Arizona. Additionally, large companies including Amazon, Texas Instruments and Caterpillar have recently moved to or expanded within Tucson, creating many new job opportunities. After taking a large hit during the 2008 recession, the area's housing market has bounced back stronger than ever. Sellers are hesitant to put their homes on the market as they feel there is still room for prices to grow. 4. Chattanooga, Tenn. Median home price: $189,000 Home price change: +3.6 percent Sales change: +2.0 percent Combined sales and price growth: +5.6 percent Set along the Tennessee River in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains sits the lively city of Chattanooga with all its Southern charm. The area still prides itself on its small town roots, but also offers residents robust nightlife with a plethora of boutique bars and cozy restaurants. Tennessee has no state income tax, which draws many young professionals and businesses to the area. After Nashville's real estate market took off, investors began looking for other opportunities within Tennessee, and this led many to Chattanooga, which also ranked No. 4 on 2019's Top Markets list. 5. Columbia, S.C. Median home price: $178,000 Home price change: -0.2 percent Sales change: +5.5 percent Combined sales and price growth: +5.3 percent The historically rich city of Columbia is South Carolina's state capital, and holds tight to its small-town roots. Columbia offers residents a high quality of life while housing remains relatively affordable. The city is known for being famously hot, but the weather isn't the only thing heating up. New construction is booming in Columbia and buyers from all over the country are migrating to the area. Columbia is also home to the University of South Carolina, making it a great area for young professionals who enjoy the energy of a college campus. 6. Rochester, N.Y. Median home price: $149,000 Home price change: +0.4 percent Sales change: +4.7 percent Combined sales and price growth: +5.1 percent New York state's third-largest metro boasts a mix of history and innovation. The city is home to two major universities -- The University of Rochester and Rochester Institute of Technology -- that consistently produce top talent and entrepreneurs. It also boasts several medical facilities such as Rochester Regional Health and large employers such as Wegmans, Paychex and Xerox. Despite a healthy job market, the area still enjoys relatively low housing prices. Former home to pioneers and independent thinkers like Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass, Rochester has worked hard to preserve and honor its landmarks. The city's downtown recently underwent a revitalization which is attracting a new group of younger residents who enjoy the area's breweries, art and jazz scene. 7. Colorado Springs, Colo. Median home price: $312,000 Home price change: +6.3 percent Sales change: -1.4 percent Combined sales and price growth: +4.9 percent Recently named the most desirable place to live in the country by U.S. News and World Report, Colorado Springs' residents enjoy an outstanding quality of life with low living costs and easy access to the Rocky Mountains. Colorado Springs has a strong job market and a highly educated workforce in aerospace, defense, cybersecurity and technology. Major employers include Lockheed Martin, Oracle, Hewlett Packard and Progressive Insurance. Residents enjoy the city's beautiful scenery and more than 70 art galleries. Colorado Springs has become a great alternative for those priced out of Denver. Given the close proximity, some choose to live in Colorado Springs and commute to Denver. 8. Winston-Salem, N.C. Median home price: $169,000 Home price change: +0.5 percent Sales change: +3.6 percent Combined sales and price growth: +4.1 percent The fifth largest city in North Carolina, Winston-Salem has become a cultural hub for fine arts and theater. The revitalization of its downtown has added a number of hotels, restaurants and apartment complexes that make it attractive to millennials and retirees alike. This led The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal to rank the city second in their respective lists of most livable downtowns in America. Wake Forest University and several small colleges attract a young crowd, but the city has also been named one of the best places to retire in the U.S. by CBS Moneywatch. Many of the area's residents refer to themselves as "half-backers" or people who moved from the Northeast to Florida, but decided to settle "half of the way" back to be closer to friends and family. 9. Charleston-North Charleston, S.C. Median home price: $270,000 Home price change: +1.9 percent Sales change: +1.2 percent Combined sales and price growth: +3.1 percent South Carolina's largest city is defined by cobblestone streets, horse-drawn carriages and pastel antebellum houses. The historic port city is consistently named one of the best small cities in the world by Conde Nast and the "World's Best City" by Travel + Leisure. Home to Charleston Air Force base and several universities, Charleston attracts a diverse group of residents who enjoy the state's low property tax rates. Major employers in the area include Boeing, Walmart, Bosch and Medical University of South Carolina. Residents and tourists alike enjoy the city's many restaurants and close proximity to the beach. 10. Memphis, Tenn. Median home price: $188,000 Home price change: +3.0 percent Sales change: +0.1 percent Combined sales and price growth: +3.1 percent Elvis's hometown is home to several major employers including FedEx, AutoZone, ServiceMaster, International Paper and First Horizon National, making it an attractive market for jobs and real estate. It's also a great place for millennials and good for singles looking to mingle, as more than half of the city's adult population is not married. Locals enjoy the short commute times, great music scene, culture and professional sports including the NBA's Grizzlies. The most populous city in Tennessee, Memphis is considered a hub for transportation with a bustling airport and easy access to four major freeways. The city also houses about two dozen college campuses along with tourism attractions like Beale Street, Graceland and the National Civil Rights Museum. For more information and methodology, click here. *Median home prices based on the January-August 2019 period. **Home price and sales change are year-over-year estimates through the end of 2020. About realtor.com® Realtor.com®, The Home of Home Search, offers the most MLS-listed for-sale listings among national real estate portals, and access to information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. Through its Opcity platform, realtor.com® uses data science and machine learning to connect consumers with a real estate professional based on their specific buying and selling needs. Realtor.com® pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today is a trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers by making all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com.
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iBuyers Rapidly Snap Up Market Share Across Southern Metros, Redfin Finds
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Redfin Report: Bidding Wars Remain at 10-Year Low in November
Nationally, just 10% of Redfin homebuying offers faced competition SEATTLE, Dec. 9, 2019 -- Ten percent of offers written by Redfin agents on behalf of their homebuying customers faced a bidding war in November, down from 29% a year earlier and hovering at the 10-year low for the 5th consecutive month, according to a new report from Redfin. This rate is likely to remain low through the end of the year, and begin rising again in early 2020. San Francisco was the only market that remained somewhat competitive in November. The bidding war rate there was 30%, down from 53% a year earlier and down from 34% in October. The month-over-month decline of 3.7 points was slightly below the 2010-2018 average October-to-November decline of 4.6 points. "Almost every home for sale that is in a great location and priced competitively is still receiving multiple offers," said San Francisco Redfin agent Miriam Westberg. "One home we made an offer on last week had 25 other offers! However, homebuyers definitely feel like they can be more selective this year, so homes that don't check every single box may only get a single offer, and tend to take a longer time to sell." Competition was scarce everywhere else in the country, with no other market seeing a bidding war rate higher than 17%. The bidding war rate hit its lowest point in at least five years in November in Chicago, Houston, Portland, OR and Los Angeles. "Even though the number of homes for sale has been falling faster than we normally see this time of year, buyers just aren't feeling any sense of urgency right now," said Redfin chief economist Daryl Fairweather. "The supply and demand data still says that it's a seller's market, but homebuyers working with Redfin agents in places like Portland and Denver are feeling and acting like they're in control. Most of the homes that they are seeing are simply not worth getting into a bidding war over, so they're more than willing to wait until the new year in the hopes that more homes will hit the market." 2019 as a whole has been a welcome reprieve from the frenzied market of years prior, but with fewer new listings hitting the market and more homes selling quickly after being listed, 2020 may be shaping up to swing the pendulum back in the other direction. Houston was the least competitive market in November, with just 1.4% of offers facing a bidding war. Miami was barely above that at 1.7% and Raleigh was the third least competitive market with 2.6% of offers facing competition. Rate of Bidding Wars by Metro Area: November 2019 To read the full report, please click here. About Redfin Redfin is a technology-powered real estate brokerage, combining its own full-service agents with modern technology to redefine real estate in the consumer's favor. Founded by software engineers, Redfin has the country's #1 brokerage website and offers a host of online tools to consumers, including the Redfin Estimate, the automated home-value estimate with the industry's lowest published error rate for listed homes. Homebuyers and sellers enjoy a full-service, technology-powered experience from Redfin real estate agents, while saving thousands in commissions. Redfin serves more than 85 major metro areas across the U.S. and Canada. The company has closed more than $85 billion in home sales.
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CoreLogic Reports October Home Prices Increased by 3.5% Year Over Year
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Pending Home Sales Decline 1.7% in October
WASHINGTON (November 27, 2019) -- Pending home sales retreated in October, taking a slight step back after two prior months of increases, according to the National Association of Realtors. The Northeast experienced a minor uptick last month, but the other three major U.S. regions reported declines in month-over-month contract activity. However, pending home sales were up nationally and up in all regions compared to a year ago. The Pending Home Sales Index (PHSI), a forward-looking indicator based on contract signings, fell 1.7% to 106.7 in October. Year-over-year contract signings jumped 4.4%. An index of 100 is equal to the level of contract activity in 2001. Lawrence Yun, NAR's chief economist, noted the decline in inventory and a small rise in mortgage rates in October from September to, in part, explain this month's signings drop. "While contract signings have decreased, the overall economic landscape remains favorable," Yun said. "Mortgage rates continue to be low at below 4% – which will attract buyers – employment levels are strong and many recession claims have dissipated." Pointing to data from active listings at realtor.com®, Yun says the markets where listing prices are around $250,000 – an affordable price point in most markets nationally – are drawing some of the most significant buyer attention, including Fort Wayne, Ind., Pueblo, Colo., Columbus, Ohio, Rochester, N.Y., and Lafayette, Ind. "We still need to address and, more importantly, correct inadequate levels of inventory across the country," Yun said. "There is no shortage of buyers seeking homes, but a lack of available units continues to drag down the nation's housing market and overall economy." "We risk a lingering shortage of sufficient inventory if homebuilding only continues at its current pace over the next 20 years, when the U.S. population is projected to increase by more than 40 million over this period. Clearly, home builders must step in and construct more housing." October Pending Home Sales Regional Breakdown With the exception of the Northeast, all regional indices saw declines in October. The PHSI in the Northeast rose 1.9% to 95.7 in October, 3.0% higher than a year ago. In the Midwest, the index slid 2.7% to 101.4 last month, 1.8% higher than in October 2018. Pending home sales in the South decreased 1.7% to an index of 125.3 in October, a 5.1% increase from last October. The index in the West declined 3.4% in October 2019 to 91.9, which is an increase of 7.5% from a year ago. The National Association of Realtors® is America's largest trade association, representing more than 1.4 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.
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Existing-Home Sales Climb 1.9% in October
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Home Prices Rise Annually Across Most Opportunity-Zone Redevelopment Areas
Median Prices Rise Year-Over-Year in Two-Thirds of Zones Targeted for Tax Breaks IRVINE, Calif. (November 21, 2019) -- ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database and first property data provider of Data-as-a-Service (DaaS), today released its second special report analyzing qualified Opportunity Zones established by Congress in the Tax Cuts and Jobs act of 2017 (see full methodology below). In this report, ATTOM looked at nearly 3,700 zones with sufficient sales data to analyze, which included home sales prices with at least five home sales in each quarter from 2005 through the third quarter of 2019. The report found that about half the zones saw median home prices rise more than the national increase of 8.3 percent from the third quarter of 2018 to the third quarter of 2019. The report also shows that 79 percent of the zones had median home prices in the third quarter of 2019 that were less than the national median of $270,000 – almost the same percentage as in the second quarter of 2019. Some 46 percent of the zones had median prices of less than $150,000, also roughly the same as in the prior quarter. "The nationwide home-price surge in the third quarter spread through so-called Opportunity Zones, much as it did the rest of the country," said Todd Teta, chief product officer with ATTOM Data Solutions. "Despite sitting in some of the nation's poorest areas, Opportunity Zones were hardly immune from a housing boom heading into its ninth year. That's encouraging news for people living in those communities as well as investors looking to take advantage of the Opportunity Zones program." High-level findings from the report include: Among the 3,658 Opportunity Zones with sufficient data to analyze, median prices rose in 48 percent of the zoned areas by more than the national rate of gain from the third quarter of 2018 to the third quarter of 2019. The national year-over-year increase was 8.3 percent. Among the 3,658 Opportunity Zones with sufficient data to analyze, California had the most Opportunity Zones, with 477, followed by Florida (332), Texas (293), Pennsylvania (176) and North Carolina (170). Of the tracts analyzed, 46 percent had a median price in the third quarter of 2019 of less than $150,000 and 17 percent ranged from $150,000 to $199,999. Another 16 percent ranged from $200,000 up to the national median of $270,000, 21 percent were more than $270,000. All percentages were similar to those in the second quarter of 2019. In Metropolitan Statistical Areas with sufficient sales data to analyze, 87 percent of Opportunity Zones had median third quarter sales prices that were less than the median values for the surrounding MSAs. Among those, 31 percent had median sales prices that were less than half the figure for the MSAs. At the same time, 13 percent of the zones had median sales prices that were equal to or above the median sales price of the broader MSAs. The Midwest continued to have the highest rate of Opportunity Zone tracts with a median home price of less than $150,000 (71 percent), followed by the South (56 percent), the Northeast (47 percent) and the West (12 percent). States with the highest percentage of census tracts meeting Opportunity Zone requirements include Wyoming (17 percent), Mississippi (15 percent), Alabama (13 percent), North Dakota (12 percent) and New Mexico (12 percent). Washington, DC, also is among the leaders (14 percent). Nationwide, 10 percent of all tracts qualify. Report methodology The ATTOM Data Solutions Opportunity Zones analysis is based on home sales price data derived from recorded sales deeds. Statistics for previous quarters are revised when each new report is issued as more deed data becomes available. ATTOM Data Solutions compared median home prices in tracts designated as Opportunity Zones by the Internal Revenue Service. Except where noted, tracts were used for the analysis if they had at least five sales in each quarter from 2005 through the third quarter of 2019. Median household income data for tracts and counties comes from surveys taken the U.S. Census Bureau (www.census.gov) from 2013 through 2017. The list of designated Qualified Opportunity Zones is located at U.S. Department of the Treasury. Regions are based on designations by the Census Bureau. Hawaii and Alaska, which the bureau designates as part of the Pacific region, were included in the West region for this report. About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, APIs, real estate market trends, marketing lists, match & append and introducing the first property data delivery solution, a cloud-based data platform that streamlines data management – Data-as-a-Service (DaaS).
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Unacast Expands The Real World Graph to Include Neighborhood Activity and Travel Patterns
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Redfin Report: National Bidding War Rate on Homes Hit a 10-Year Low in October
Competition in the Bay Area saw unseasonal uptick despite a smaller than anticipated impact from recent tech IPOs SEATTLE, Nov. 13, 2019 -- Nationally, just 10 percent of offers written by Redfin agents on behalf of their homebuying customers faced a bidding war in October, down from 39 percent a year earlier and now at a 10-year-low, according to a new report from Redfin. However, low mortgage rates and a lack of homes for sale point to a likely return of bidding wars next year. Of the top five markets where bidding wars were most common in October, four were in California—San Francisco (34.8%), San Jose (20.5%), San Diego (15.6%) and Los Angeles (13.7%). On the East Coast, in Philadelphia, 13.8 percent of offers faced bidding wars. The rate of bidding wars in San Francisco and San Jose hit new highs for the year in October, a month when competition typically cools. That said, both markets' bidding war rates were still well below last year's levels of 58.1 percent and 64.9 percent, respectively. If 2019's big tech stock IPOs like Uber, Lyft, and Slack had been as hot as many expected earlier in the year, it's likely the market in the Bay Area would be a lot more competitive right now. "There was a lot of hype earlier this year in the Bay Area around some big IPOs," said Palo Alto Redfin agent Kalena Mashing. "But we haven't seen that hype translate into a hot market, regardless of how well the IPOs did. Really, it's not the IPO money making the market hot, it's the perception that the IPO money could make the market hot that has really driven the local housing market this year." This unseasonal uptick in competition in the Bay Area may be a sign of things to come elsewhere, according to Redfin chief economist Daryl Fairweather. "Right now, there are fewer homes for sale than we usually see this time of year, and sales are picking up thanks in part to low mortgage interest rates. All of the pieces are in place for bidding wars to become more common and for the housing market to shift back toward the seller's favor next year," said Fairweather. "Now may be the last chance in the foreseeable future for buyers to win a home without facing a bidding war." Seattle had a bidding war rate of just 8.8 percent, below the national level and barely above the 10-year low set in July. This is despite the fact that a year ago it used to be among the most competitive markets, along with San Francisco and San Jose. "Homebuyers in Seattle know that in the current market, they don't necessarily have to go through the emotional heartburn that comes with bidding wars," said Seattle Redfin agent Jessie Boucher. "Even though there aren't a ton of homes for sale right now, buyers are able to preserve their contingencies and maybe even get a great deal." Rate of Bidding Wars by Metro Area: October 2019 To read the full report, please click here. About Redfin Redfin is a technology-powered real estate brokerage, combining its own full-service agents with modern technology to redefine real estate in the consumer's favor. Founded by software engineers, Redfin has the country's #1 brokerage website and offers a host of online tools to consumers, including the Redfin Estimate, the automated home-value estimate with the industry's lowest published error rate for listed homes. Homebuyers and sellers enjoy a full-service, technology-powered experience from Redfin real estate agents, while saving thousands in commissions. Redfin serves more than 85 major metro areas across the U.S. and Canada. The company has closed more than $85 billion in home sales.
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity in October 2019 Climbs Upward from Previous Month
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CoreLogic Reports U.S. Overall Delinquency Rate Lowest for an August in at Least 20 Years but Five States Post Annual Gains
CoreLogic, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its monthly Loan Performance Insights Report. The report shows that nationally, 3.7% of mortgages were in some stage of delinquency (30 days or more past due, including those in foreclosure) in August 2019, representing a 0.2 percentage point decline in the overall delinquency rate compared with August 2018, when it was 3.9%. As of August 2019, the foreclosure inventory rate – which measures the share of mortgages in some stage of the foreclosure process – was 0.4%, down 0.1 percentage points from August 2018. The August 2019 foreclosure inventory rate tied the prior nine months as the lowest for any month since at least January 1999. Measuring early-stage delinquency rates is important for analyzing the health of the mortgage market. To monitor mortgage performance comprehensively, CoreLogic examines all stages of delinquency, as well as transition rates, which indicate the percentage of mortgages moving from one stage of delinquency to the next. The rate for early-stage delinquencies – defined as 30 to 59 days past due – was 1.8% in August 2019, unchanged from August 2018. The share of mortgages 60 to 89 days past due in August 2019 was 0.6%, unchanged from August 2018. The serious delinquency rate – defined as 90 days or more past due, including loans in foreclosure – was 1.3% in August 2019, down from 1.5% in August 2018. This August's serious delinquency rate of 1.3% was the lowest for the month of August since 2005 when it was also 1.3%. The serious delinquency rate has remained consistent since April 2019. Since early-stage delinquencies can be volatile, CoreLogic also analyzes transition rates. The share of mortgages that transitioned from current to 30 days past due was 0.8% in August 2019, unchanged from August 2018. By comparison, in January 2007, just before the start of the financial crisis, the current-to-30-day transition rate was 1.2%, while it peaked at 2% in November 2008. "Job loss can trigger a loan delinquency, especially for families with limited savings," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist at CoreLogic. "The rise in overall delinquency in Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska and Wisconsin coincided with a rise in state unemployment rates between August 2018 and August 2019." The nation's overall delinquency remains near the lowest level since at least 1999. However, five states posted small annual increases in overall delinquency rates in August: Iowa (0.2 percentage points), Minnesota (0.1 percentage points), Nebraska (0.1 percentage points), Wisconsin (0.1 percentage points) and Rhode Island (0.1 percentage points). In August 2019, 47 metropolitan areas recorded small annual increases in overall delinquency rates. Some of the highest gains were in the Midwest and Southeast. Metros with the largest increases were Dubuque, Iowa (2.2 percentage points), Pine Bluff, Arkansas (1.1 percentage points), Goldsboro, North Carolina (0.6 percentage points) and Panama City, Florida (0.5 percentage points). While the nation's serious delinquency rate remains near a record low, 19 metropolitan areas recorded small annual increases in their serious delinquency rates. Metros with the largest increases were Panama City, Florida (0.9 percentage points), Jacksonville, North Carolina (0.2 percentage points), Wilmington, North Carolina (0.2 percentage points) and Goldsboro, North Carolina (0.2 percentage points). The remaining 15 metro areas logged annual increases of 0.1 percentage point. "Delinquency rates are at 14-year lows, reflecting a decade of tight underwriting standards, the benefits of prolonged low interest rates and the improved balance sheets of many households across the country," said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "Despite this month's near record-low serious delinquency rate, several metros in hurricane-ravaged areas of the Southeast have experienced higher delinquency rates of late. We expect to see these metros to return to pre-disaster delinquency rates over the next several months." The next CoreLogic Loan Performance Insights Report will be released on December 10, 2019, featuring data for September 2019. For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog. About CoreLogic CoreLogic, the leading provider of property insights and solutions, promotes a healthy housing market and thriving communities. Through its enhanced property data solutions, services and technologies, CoreLogic enables real estate professionals, financial institutions, insurance carriers, government agencies and other housing market participants to help millions of people find, acquire and protect their homes. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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U.S. Homeowners Found Far More Likely to Be Equity Rich than Seriously Underwater in Q3 2019
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Luxury Housing Market Stabilized in the Third Quarter After a Weak First Half
Sales of homes priced at or above $1.5 million increased 3.2% annually, a sign that the high-end market is moderating after recession fears marred the first two quarters SEATTLE, Nov. 7, 2019 -- The average sale price for luxury homes nationwide rose 0.3 percent year over year to $1.6 million in the third quarter of 2019, according to a new report from Redfin. Even though that's essentially flat, it marks the first time luxury prices did not drop after three straight quarters of declines. For this analysis, Redfin tracked home sales in more than 1,000 cities across the U.S. (not including New York City) and defines a home as luxury if it's among the 5 percent most expensive homes sold in the quarter. In the other 95 percent of the market, home prices increased 3.6 percent annually to an average of $319,000 in the third quarter. Sales of homes priced at or above $1.5 million rose 3.2 percent in the third quarter. The increase comes after three straight quarters of dipping sales in the luxury sector, including a 12 percent annual drop in the first quarter of 2019. Sales of homes priced below $1.5 million experienced a similar annual increase, with a 2.9 percent rise. Supply of homes priced at or above $1.5 million rose 9.3 percent year over year in the third quarter, the sixth consecutive quarter of growth, albeit the smallest annual increase in a year. The big increase in luxury supply was largely driven by a boost in the number of high-priced homes hitting the market. New listings priced at or above $1.5 million rose 6 percent year over year in the third quarter, while new listings of homes priced below $1.5 million dropped 4 percent. "Because recession fears peaked over the summer, I expected luxury home prices and sales to dip. But it appears that nerves alone weren't enough to scare off wealthy homebuyers," said Redfin chief economist Daryl Fairweather. "The U.S. economy grew faster than expected in the third quarter, partly as a result of healthy consumer spending. Those results, along with flat luxury home prices and rising sales, go to show that Americans are basing their spending habits on their own personal financial situation rather than concerns about global economic tensions. For many, that means strong incomes and good employment prospects." Luxury housing market summary Biggest luxury price gains Luxury prices increased in more than two-thirds of the markets tracked by Redfin. West Palm Beach tops the list, with a 128.3 percent year-over-year increase to an average price of more than $3.7 million. It's followed by two other cities in Florida: Clearwater (up 49.3% to $1.6 million) and Delray Beach (up 47.3% to $2.6 million). West Palm Beach Redfin agent Elena Glatko said one driving force in the particularly large year-over-year price increase in West Palm Beach in the third quarter was dozens of sales in a new luxury condo building. Sale prices for individual units spanned from roughly $4 million to more than $12 million. Glatko also noted a few other factors that contribute to the area's strong luxury market. "Homebuyers can get a lot more for their money in West Palm Beach than in more expensive places like Miami and Palm Beach Island," Glatko said. "And I've noticed that both luxury buyers and sellers feel that real estate is one of the assets least susceptible to economic changes. They believe that over time, luxury real estate is a better investment than the stock market." Biggest luxury price declines Luxury home prices in Charleston, South Carolina declined 17.6 percent to an average of $1.6 million in the third quarter, a bigger drop than any other city. Next come Virginia Beach (down 7.6% to $1 million) and Reno (down 6.9% to about $1.5 million). Luxury prices also declined in San Diego (down 4% to about $2.6 million), Miami (down 3.8% to about $2 million), San Jose (down 3.2% to about $2.3 million) and Scottsdale (down 1.5% to about $2 million). "There's been less activity in the luxury market in Miami over the last few years, and now it's definitely shifting toward buyer's favor," said local Redfin agent Jessica Johnson. "Sellers in the area can't get away with overpricing their home because buyers are less willing to overpay when they know luxury prices aren't increasing in Miami—if they can't get a good deal on one particular luxury home, they can probably go down the street or to another neighborhood and find a seller who is willing to negotiate with them." To read the full luxury report, including the methodology, please visit: https://redfin.com/blog/q3-2019-luxury-housing-report. About Redfin Redfin is a technology-powered real estate brokerage, combining its own full-service agents with modern technology to redefine real estate in the consumer's favor. Founded by software engineers, Redfin has the country's #1 brokerage website and offers a host of online tools to consumers, including the Redfin Estimate, the automated home-value estimate with the industry's lowest published error rate for listed homes. Homebuyers and sellers enjoy a full-service, technology-powered experience from Redfin real estate agents, while saving thousands in commissions. Redfin serves more than 85 major metro areas across the U.S. and Canada. The company has closed more than $85 billion in home sales. For more information or to contact a local Redfin real estate agent, visit www.redfin.com.
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Pending Home Sales Rise 1.5% in September
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Existing-Home Sales Decrease 2.2% in September
WASHINGTON (October 22, 2019) – Existing-home sales receded in September following two consecutive months of increases, according to the National Association of Realtors®. Each of the four major regions witnessed sales drop off last month, with the Midwest absorbing the brunt of those declines. Total existing-home sales completed transactions that include single-family homes, townhomes, condominiums and co-ops, fell 2.2% from August to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.38 million in September. Despite the decline, overall sales are up 3.9% from a year ago (5.18 million in September 2018). Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist, said that despite historically low mortgage rates, sales have not commensurately increased, in part due to a low level of new housing options. “We must continue to beat the drum for more inventory,” said Yun, who has called for additional home construction for over a year. “Home prices are rising too rapidly because of the housing shortage, and this lack of inventory is preventing home sales growth potential.” The median existing-home price for all housing types in September was $272,100, up 5.9% from September 2018 ($256,900), as prices rose in all regions. September’s price increase marks 91 straight months of year-over-year gains. Total housing inventory at the end of September sat at 1.83 million, approximately equal to the amount of existing-homes available for sale in August, but a 2.7% decrease from 1.88 million one year ago. Unsold inventory is at a 4.1-month supply at the current sales pace, up from 4.0 months in August and down from the 4.4-month figure recorded in September 2018. Properties typically remained on the market for 32 days in September, up from 31 days in August and even with September 2018. Forty-nine percent of homes sold in September 2019 were on the market for less than a month. First-time buyers were responsible for 33% of sales in September, up from 31% in August and 32% recorded in September 2018. NAR’s 2018 Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers – released in late 2018 – revealed that the annual share of first-time buyers was 33%. As the share of first-time buyers rose, individual investors or second-home buyers, who account for many cash sales, purchased 14% of homes in September 2019, unchanged from August but down from 16% recorded last September. All-cash sales accounted for 17% of transactions in September, down from 19% in August and 21% in September 2018. Distressed sales – foreclosures and short sales – represented 2% of sales in September, unchanged from August but down from 3% in September 2018. “For families on the sidelines thinking about buying a home, current rates are making the climate extremely favorable in markets across the country,” said NAR President John Smaby, a second-generation Realtor® from Edina, Minnesota, and broker at Edina Realty. “These traditionally low rates make it that much easier to qualify for a mortgage, and they also open up various housing selections to buyers everywhere.” According to Freddie Mac, the average commitment rate for a 30-year, conventional, fixed-rate mortgage decreased to 3.61% in September, down from 3.62% in August. The average commitment rate across all of 2018 was 4.54%. “Mortgage rates under 4% are amazingly attractive for homebuyers,” said Yun. “The rise in foot traffic as evidenced by the open rates of SentriLock key boxes shows growing buyer interest.” Single-family and Condo/Co-op Sales Single-family home sales sat at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.78 million in September, down from 4.91 million in August, but up 3.9% from a year ago. The median existing single-family home price was $275,100 in September 2019, up 6.1% from September 2018. Existing condominium and co-op sales were recorded at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 600,000 units in September, 1.7% above the previous month and 3.4% higher than a year ago. The median existing condo price was $248,600 in September, which is an increase of 4.5% from a year ago. Regional Breakdown As noted, existing-home sales in September dropped in every region compared to the month prior. Compared to last year, September sales increased in three of the four major regions, while neither growing nor declining in the Midwest. Median home prices in every region increased from one year ago. September existing-home sales in the Northeast fell 2.8% to an annual rate of 690,000, a 1.5% rise from a year ago. The median price in the Northeast was $301,100, up 5.2% from September 2018. In the Midwest, existing-home sales dropped 3.1% to an annual rate of 1.27 million, which is nearly equal to August 2018. The median price in the Midwest was $213,500, a 7.2% jump from a year ago. Existing-home sales in the South decreased 2.1% to an annual rate of 2.28 million in September, up 6.0% from a year ago. The median price in the South was $237,300, up 6.3% from one year ago. Existing-home sales in the West declined 0.9% to an annual rate of 1.14 million in September, 5.6% above a year ago. The median price in the West was $403,600, up 4.5% from September 2018. Realtor.com®’s Market Hotness Index, measuring time-on-the-market data and listing views per property, revealed that the hottest metro areas in September were Fort Wayne, Ind.; Rochester, N.Y.; Pueblo, Colo.; Columbus, Ohio; and Topeka, Kan. The National Association of Realtors® is America’s largest trade association, representing more than 1.3 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.
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Showing Index Reflects Surprising Strength in Buyer Demand with Back-to-Back Months of Increased Nationwide Activity
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Q3 2019 Foreclosure Activity Down 19 Percent from Year Ago to Lowest Level Since Q2 2005
Average Time to Foreclose Increases 18 Percent From Last Year; Foreclosure Starts Down From Year Ago But Up in 30 Percent of Local Markets IRVINE, Calif. - Oct. 17, 2019 -- ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database and first property data provider of Data-as-a-Service (DaaS), today released its Q3 2019 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report, which shows there were a total of 143,105 U.S. properties with foreclosure filings — default notices, scheduled auctions or bank repossessions — in the third quarter, down 6 percent from the previous quarter and down 19 percent from a year ago to the lowest level since Q2 2005 — a more than 13-year low. U.S. foreclosure activity in Q3 2019 was 49 percent below the pre-recession average of 278,912 properties with foreclosure filings per quarter between Q1 2006 and Q3 2007 — the 12th consecutive quarter where U.S. foreclosure activity has registered below the pre-recession average. "Foreclosure activity continues to decline across the country, which is a good sign that the housing market and the broader economy remain strong – and that the lending excesses that helped bring down the economy during the Great Recession remain a memory," said Todd Teta, chief product officer at ATTOM Data Solutions. "This is not to say that everything in the latest foreclosure picture is rosy. Some states have seen their foreclosure rates increase this year, which could cause some concern. But overall, the foreclosure numbers reflect a market in which buyers can afford their homes and lenders remain careful in loaning to home buyers who have little chance of repaying." Foreclosure starts down nationwide, up in 30 percent of local markets Lenders started the foreclosure process on 78,394 U.S. properties in Q3 2019, down 8 percent from the previous quarter and down 15 percent from a year ago — the 17th consecutive quarter with a year-over-year decrease in foreclosure starts. Counter to the national trend, 14 states posted year-over-year increases in foreclosure starts in Q3 2019, including Montana (up 33 percent); Georgia (up 32 percent); Washington (up 16 percent); Louisiana (up 15 percent); and Michigan (up 12 percent). Also counter to the national trend, 66 of 220 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report (30 percent) posted a year-over-year increase in foreclosure starts in Q3 2019. Those markets with at least 1 million people that posted year-over-year increases included, Atlanta, Georgia (up 37 percent); Columbus, Ohio (up 27 percent); San Antonio, Texas (up 24 percent); Portland, Oregon (up 22 percent); and Tucson, Arizona (up 21 percent). Highest foreclosure rates in Delaware, New Jersey, Maryland Nationwide one in every 946 properties had a foreclosure filing in Q3 2019. States with the highest foreclosure rates in Q3 2019 were Delaware (one in every 415 housing units with a foreclosure filing); New Jersey (one in every 436); Maryland (one in every 500); Illinois (one in every 517); and Florida (one in every 577). Among 220 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report, those with the highest foreclosure rates in Q3 2019 were Atlantic City, New Jersey (one in every 269 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Trenton, New Jersey (one in every 312); Rockford, Illinois (one in every 366); Fayetteville, North Carolina (one in every 369); and Peoria, Illinois (one in every 388). Bank repossessions see slight uptick from previous quarter Lenders repossessed 34,432 U.S. properties through foreclosure (REO) in Q3 2019, up 6 percent from the previous quarter but down 33 percent from a year ago. Counter to the national trend, 16 states posted quarter-over-quarter decreases in REO activity in Q3 2019, including Maryland (down 37 percent); Tennessee (down 19 percent); Delaware (down 16 percent); New Jersey (down 13 percent); and Arizona (down 11 percent). Average time to foreclose sees an uptick Properties foreclosed in Q3 2019 had been in the foreclosure process an average of 841 days, up from 716 days in the previous quarter and up from 713 days in Q3 2018 to the highest level since Q4 2017. States with the longest average foreclosure timelines for homes foreclosed in Q3 2018 were Indiana (1,633 days); Hawaii (1,626 days); Nevada (1,511 days); New Jersey (1,173 days); and Georgia (1,170 days). States with the shortest average foreclosure timelines for homes foreclosed in Q3 2018 were Virginia (201 days); Montana (217 days); Mississippi (229 days); Alaska (258 days); and Oregon (283 days). U.S. Foreclosure Market Data by State – Q3 2019 September 2019 Foreclosure Activity High-Level Takeaways Nationwide in September 2019 one in every 2,767 properties had a foreclosure filing States with the highest foreclosure rates in September 2019 were Delaware (one in every 1,170 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Maryland (one in every 1,270 housing units); Illinois (one in every 1,409 housing units); New Jersey (one in every 1,534 housing units); and Connecticut (one in every 1,997 housing units). 24,453 U.S. properties started the foreclosure process in September 2019, down 12 percent from the previous month and down 15 percent from a year ago. September 2019 marked the 8th consecutive month with a year-over-year decrease in foreclosure starts. Lenders completed the foreclosure process on 11,869 U.S. properties in September 2019, up 3 percent from the previous month and up 10 percent from a year ago. About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, APIs, real estate market trends, marketing lists, match & append and introducing the first property data deliver solution, a cloud-based data platform that streamlines data management – Data-as-a-Service (DaaS).
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Austin Board of REALTORS adopts Remine for its 15,000 MLS subscribers
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CoreLogic Reports U.S. Overall Delinquency Rate Lowest for a July in at Least 20 Years, but Four States Post Annual Gains
CoreLogic, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its monthly Loan Performance Insights Report. The report shows that nationally, 3.8% of mortgages were in some stage of delinquency (30 days or more past due, including those in foreclosure) in July 2019, representing a 0.3 percentage point decline in the overall delinquency rate compared with July 2018, when it was 4.1%. As of July 2019, the foreclosure inventory rate – which measures the share of mortgages in some stage of the foreclosure process – was 0.4%, down 0.1 percentage points from July 2018. The July 2019 foreclosure inventory rate tied the prior eight months as the lowest for any month since at least January 1999. Measuring early-stage delinquency rates is important for analyzing the health of the mortgage market. To monitor mortgage performance comprehensively, CoreLogic examines all stages of delinquency, as well as transition rates, which indicate the percentage of mortgages moving from one stage of delinquency to the next. The rate for early-stage delinquencies – defined as 30 to 59 days past due – was 1.8% in July 2019, down from 1.9% in July 2018. The share of mortgages 60 to 89 days past due in July 2019 was 0.6%, unchanged from July 2018. The serious delinquency rate – defined as 90 days or more past due, including loans in foreclosure – was 1.3% in July 2019, down from 1.6% in July 2018. This July's serious delinquency rate of 1.3% was the lowest for the month of July since 2005 when it was also 1.3%; it tied the April, May and June 2019 rates as the lowest for any month since it was also 1.3% in August 2005. Since early-stage delinquencies can be volatile, CoreLogic also analyzes transition rates. The share of mortgages that transitioned from current to 30 days past due was 0.8% in July 2019, unchanged from July 2018. By comparison, in January 2007, just before the start of the financial crisis, the current-to-30-day transition rate was 1.2%, while it peaked at 2% in November 2008. "Homeowners have seen a big rise in home equity, which lowers foreclosure risk because owners have more ‘skin in the game,'" said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist at CoreLogic. "Our latest Home Equity report found that between the first quarter of 2011 and the second quarter of 2019, average equity per borrower increased from $75,000 to $176,000 and rose $5,000 in the past year alone." The nation's overall delinquency remains near the lowest level since at least 1999. However, four states posted small annual increases in overall delinquency rates in July: Vermont (0.5 percentage points), New Hampshire (0.2 percentage points), Iowa (0.1 percentage points) and Minnesota (0.1 percentage points). Five states, including three of the four listed above, posted small annual gains in the share of mortgages that transitioned from current-to-30-days past due in July: Vermont (0.3 percentage points), New Hampshire (0.1 percentage points), Iowa (0.1 percentage points), Wisconsin (0.1 percentage points) and Florida (0.1 percentage points). In July 2019, 37 metropolitan areas recorded small increases in overall delinquency rates. Some of the highest gains were in the Midwest and Southeast. Metros with the largest increases were Dubuque, Iowa (2.5 percentage points), Davenport-Moline-Rock Island, Iowa-Illinois (1.5 percentage points) and Pine Bluff, Arkansas (1.1 percentage points). Panama City, Florida, and Goldsboro, North Carolina, both experienced increases of 0.5 percentage points. "The fundamentals of the housing market remain very solid with foreclosure rates hitting lows not seen in over 20 years," said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "We expect foreclosure rates may very well drift even lower in the months ahead as wage growth and lower mortgage rates provide support for homeownership." The next CoreLogic Loan Performance Insights Report will be released on November 12, 2019, featuring data for August 2019. For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX), the leading provider of property insights and solutions, promotes a healthy housing market and thriving communities. Through its enhanced property data solutions, services and technologies, CoreLogic enables real estate professionals, financial institutions, insurance carriers, government agencies and other housing market participants to help millions of people find, acquire and protect their homes. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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CoreLogic Reports August Home Prices Increased by 3.6% Year Over Year
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Median-Priced Homes Remain Unaffordable for Average Wage Earners in 74 Percent of U.S. Housing Markets
Rising Home Prices Outpacing Wages in 76 percent of U.S. Housing Markets; Home Prices Less Affordable Than Historic Average in 61 Percent of Local Markets IRVINE, Calif. - Sept. 26, 2019 -- ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database and first property data provider of Data-as-a-Service (DaaS), today released its Q3 2019 U.S. Home Affordability Report, which shows that median home prices in the third quarter of 2019 were not affordable for average wage earners in 371 of 498 U.S. counties analyzed in the report (74 percent). The largest populated counties where a median-priced home in the third quarter of 2019 was not affordable for average wage earners included Los Angeles County, CA; Cook County (Chicago), IL; Maricopa County (Phoenix), AZ; San Diego County, CA and Orange County, CA. Those same counties were in the top five in Q2 2019. The 127 counties (26 percent of the 498 counties analyzed in the report) where a median-priced home in the third quarter of 2019 was still affordable for average wage earners included Harris County (Houston), TX; Wayne County (Detroit), MI; Philadelphia County, PA; Cuyahoga County (Cleveland), OH; and Allegheny County (Pittsburgh), PA. The report determined affordability for average wage earners by calculating the amount of income needed to make monthly house payments — including mortgage, property taxes and insurance — on a median-priced home, assuming a 3 percent down payment and a 28 percent maximum "front-end" debt-to-income ratio. That required income was then compared to annualized average weekly wage data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (see full methodology below). "Buying a home continues to be a rough road to navigate for the average wage earner in the United States. Prices are going up substantially faster than earnings in 2019 without any immediate end in sight, which continues to make home ownership difficult or impossible for a majority of single-income households and even for many families with two incomes," said Todd Teta, chief product officer with ATTOM Data Solutions. "If there is any silver lining to the picture, it's that mortgage rates have fallen back to historic lows. That's softening the blow of rising prices and actually making home ownership a bit more attainable in most areas of the country." Home price appreciation outpacing wage growth in 76 percent of markets Home price appreciation outpaced average weekly wage growth in 379 of the 498 counties analyzed in the report (76 percent), including Westchester County (New York), NY; Los Angeles County, CA; Suffolk County (Boston), MA; Arlington County (Washington), VA; and Monterey County (Salinas), CA. Average annualized wage growth outpaced home price appreciation in 119 of the 498 counties analyzed in the report (24 percent), including San Diego County, CA; Orange County (Los Angeles), CA; Miami-Dade County, FL; Kings County (Brooklyn), NY and Queens County, NY. 67 percent of markets require at least 30 percent of wages to buy a home Among the 498 counties analyzed in the report, 335 (67 percent) require at least 30 percent of their annualized weekly wages to buy a home in the third quarter of 2019. Those counties that required the greatest percent included Kings County (Brooklyn), NY (110.4 percent of annualized weekly wages needed to buy a home); Santa Cruz County, CA (105 percent); Marin County (San Francisco), CA (102.4 percent); Maui County, HI (87.9 percent); and Monterey County, CA (87.5 percent). A total of 163 of the 498 counties analyzed in the report (33 percent) required less than 30 percent of their annualized weekly wages to buy a home in the third quarter of 2019. Those counties that required the smallest percent included Calhoun County (Battle Creek), MI (14.4 percent of annualized weekly wages needed to buy a home); Wayne County (Detroit), MI (14.9 percent); Clayton County (Atlanta), GA (15.2 percent); Rock Island County (Davenport), IL (15.5 percent); and Montgomery County, AL (16.2 percent). 61 percent of markets less affordable than historic averages Among the 498 counties analyzed in the report, 304 (61 percent) were less affordable than their historic affordability averages in the third quarter of 2019, down from 70 percent of counties in the previous quarter and 73 percent of counties in the third quarter of 2018. Counties with a population greater than 1 million and that were less affordable than their historic affordability averages (indexes of less than 100 are considered less affordable compared to their historic averages) included Los Angeles County, CA (index of 96); Harris County (Houston), TX (89); Maricopa County (Phoenix), AZ (93); Orange County, CA (99); and Miami-Dade County, FL (98). Counties with the lowest affordability index were Delaware County (Philadelphia), PA (index of 58); Lackawanna County (Scranton), PA (68); Genesee County (Flint), MI (69); Delaware County (Muncie), IN (69); and Saginaw County, MI (72). 39 percent of markets more affordable than historic averages Among the 498 counties analyzed in the report, 194 (39 percent) were more affordable than their historic affordability averages in the third quarter of 2019, including Cook County (Chicago), IL; San Diego County, CA; Queens County, NY; King County (Seattle), WA; and Santa Clara County (San Jose), CA. Counties with the highest affordability index (indexes of more than 100 are considered more affordable compared to their historic averages) were Onslow County (Jacksonville), NC (130); Clark County (Louisville, KY), IN (128); Atlantic County (Atlantic City), NJ (127); Cumberland County (Vineland), NJ (126); Litchfield County (Torrington), CT (124); and Warren County (Stroudsburg), NJ (124). About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, APIs, real estate market trends, marketing lists, match & append and introducing the first property data deliver solution, a cloud-based data platform that streamlines data management – Data-as-a-Service (DaaS).
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Pending Home Sales Grow 1.6% in August
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U.S. Home Flipping Returns Drop to Nearly Eight-Year Low in Q2 2019
Flipping Rate Declines After Spike In Q1 2019; Total Dollar Volume of Homes Flipped With Financing Reaches $8.4 billion – A 13-Year High IRVINE, Calif. – September 19, 2019 — ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database and first property data provider of Data-as-a-Service (DaaS), today released its Q2 2019 U.S. Home Flipping Report, which shows that 59,876 U.S. single family homes and condos were flipped in the second quarter of 2019, up 12.4 percent from the previous quarter, but down 5.2 percent from a year ago. The homes flipped in the second quarter represented 5.9 percent of all home sales during the quarter, down from a post-recession high of 7.2 percent in the previous quarter, but up from 5.4 percent a year ago. Homes flipped in Q2 2019 typically generated a gross profit of $62,700 (the difference between the median sale price and median paid by investors), up 2 percent from the previous quarter, but down 2 percent from a year ago. The typical gross flipping profit of $62,700 in Q2 2019 translated into a 39.9 percent return on investment compared to the original acquisition price, down from a 40.9 percent gross flipping ROI in Q1 2019 and from a margin of 44.4 percent in Q2 2018. Returns on home flips have dropped six quarters in a row and eight of the last 10, now standing at the lowest level since Q4 2011. "Home flipping keeps getting less and less profitable, which is another marker that the post-recession housing boom is softening or may be coming to an end," said Todd Teta, chief product officer at ATTOM Data Solutions. "Flipping houses is still a good business to be in and profits are healthy in most parts of the country. But push-and-pull forces in the housing market appear to be working less and less in investors' favor. That's leading to declining profits and a business that is nowhere near as good as it was a few years ago." Home flipping rate up from a year ago in 70 percent of local markets Despite the quarterly drop in home-flipping rates, 104 of 149 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report (70 percent) posted a year-over-year increase in their rates in Q2 2019, including Raleigh, NC (up 72 percent); Charlotte, NC (up 54 percent); Atlanta, GA (up 46 percent); San Antonio, TX (up 46 percent) and Tucson, AZ (up 43 percent). Among the areas analyzed, the number of homes flipped reached new peaks in Q2 2019 in 10 MSAs. The largest were Charlotte, NC; San Antonio, TX; Pittsburgh, PA; Oklahoma City, OK and Raleigh, NC. Home flip lending volume up 31 percent from a year ago, to 13-year high The total dollar volume of financed home flip purchases in the second quarter of 2019 was $8.4 billion, up 31.3 percent from $6.4 billion in Q2 2018 to the highest level since Q3 2006. Flipped properties originally purchased by the investor with financing represented 41.0 percent of all home flips in Q2 2019, up slightly from 40.8 percent in the previous quarter, but down from 45.9 percent a year ago. Among 53 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report with at least 1 million people, those with the highest percentage of Q2 2019 completed flips purchased with financing were Salt Lake City, UT (93.7 percent); Austin, TX (92.6 percent); Dallas-Fort Worth, TX (86.4 percent); San Antonio, TX (83.1 percent) and Kansas City, MO (82.2 percent). Investors are doubling their money in five markets Among the 149 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report with at least 50 home flips completed in Q2 2019, five had gross ROI flipping profits of more than 100 percent: Scranton, PA (134 percent); Pittsburgh, PA (132.5 percent); Reading, PA (129.3 percent); Kingsport, TN (104.1 percent) and Augusta, GA (101.1 percent). Along with Pittsburgh, metro areas with a population of at least 1 million and the highest gross flipping ROI included Philadelphia, PA (99.9 percent); Cleveland, OH (98.3 percent); Baltimore, MD (91.5 percent) and Buffalo, NY (85.5 percent). Average home flipping returns continue to slip Homes flipped in the second quarter of 2019 were sold for a median price of $220,000, with a gross flipping profit of $62,700 above the median purchase price of $157,300. The Q2 2019 figure was up from a gross flipping profit of $61,500 in the previous quarter, but down from $64,000 in Q2 2018. Of those 149 markets with at least 50 or more flips and a population greater than 200,000 in the second quarter of 2019, those that saw the smallest gross flipping profits were Montgomery, AL (profit of $23,250); Raleigh, NC (profit of $24,000); Springfield, MO (profit of $27,025); San Antonio, TX (profit of $27,117) and Savannah, GA (profit of $28,900). Markets with the smallest rates of returns included Raleigh, NC (10.9 percent ROI); Las Vegas, NV (15.2 percent ROI); Phoenix, AZ (15.3 percent ROI); San Antonio, TX (15.6 percent ROI) and San Francisco, CA (17.1 percent ROI). Areas that saw their ROIs drop most in Q2 2019 included Raleigh, NC (down 72 percent from an ROI of 38.7 percent to 10.9 percent), Savannah, GA (down 56 percent, from an ROI of 47.3 percent to 20.6 percent); San Antonio, TX (down 53 percent, from an ROI of 33 percent to 15.6 percent); Springfield, MO (down 52 percent from an ROI of 42 percent to 20.2 percent) and Baton Rouge, LA (down 50 percent from 106.6 percent to 53.5 percent). Average time to flip nationwide is 184 days Homes flipped in Q2 2019 took an average of 184 days to complete the flip, up from an average of 180 days for homes flipped in Q1 2019 and up from an average of 183 days a year ago. Among the 149 metro areas analyzed in the report, those with the shortest average days to flip were Memphis, TN (137 days); Mobile, AL (147 days); Raleigh, NC (150 days); McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, TX (150 days) and Phoenix, AZ (151 days). Metro areas with the longest average days to flip were Crestview-Fort Walton Beach-Destin, FL (239 days); Naples, FL (229 days); Provo, Utah (219 days); Lansing, MI (217 days) and Gainesville, FL (214 days). Flipped homes sold to FHA buyers increases from previous quarter Of the 59,786 U.S. homes flipped in Q2 2019, 14.4 percent were sold by the flipper to a buyer using a loan backed by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), up from 13.8 percent in the previous quarter and up from 12.8 percent a year ago. Among the 149 metro areas analyzed in the report, those with the highest percentage of Q2 2019 home flips sold to FHA buyers — typically first-time homebuyers — were Allentown, PA (29.6 percent); Port St. Lucie, FL (29.6 percent); Stockton, CA (28.5 percent); Fresno, CA (27.8 percent) and Lakeland, FL (27.7 percent). Seventeen counties had a home flipping rate of at least 12 percent Among 694 counties with at least 10 home flips in Q2 2019, there were 17 counties where home flips accounted for at least 12 percent of all home sales. Here are the top five: Macon County, TN in the Nashville metro area (15.8 percent); Chester County, TN in the Jackson metro area (14.7 percent); Prince George's County, MD in the Washington metro area (14.1 percent); Haralson County, GA in the Atlanta metro area (14.0 percent) and Duplin County, NC (13.9 percent). Sixteen zip codes had a home flipping rate of at least 25 percent Among 1,797 U.S. zip codes with at least 10 home flips in Q2 2019, there were 16 zip codes where home flips accounted for at least 25 percent of all home sales. Here are the top five: 85714 in Pima County, AZ (32.4 percent); 44110 in Cuyahoga County, OH (31.0 percent); 38109 Shelby County, TN (30.1 percent); 08083 in Camden County, NJ (28.6 percent) and 38118 in Shelby County, TN (28.0 percent). Report methodology ATTOM Data Solutions analyzed sales deed data for this report. A single-family home or condo flip was any arms-length transaction that occurred in the quarter where a previous arms-length transaction on the same property had occurred within the last 12 months. The average gross flipping profit is the difference between the purchase price and the flipped price (not including rehab costs and other expenses incurred, which flipping veterans estimate typically run between 20 percent and 33 percent of the property's after repair value). Gross flipping return on investment was calculated by dividing the gross flipping profit by the first sale (purchase) price. About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, APIs, real estate market trends, marketing lists, match & append and introducing the first property data deliver solution, a cloud-based data platform that streamlines data management – Data-as-a-Service (DaaS).
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Existing-Home Sales Increase 1.3% in August
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Showing Index Records Nationwide Growth for the First Time in More Than a Year, Indicating Increasing Strength in Buyer Demand
Midwest, Northeast, South and West Regions all Experience Year-Over-Year Increases, Which Could Mean More Buyer Competition is Likely This Fall September 19, 2019 – More prospective home buyers across the country came out in August compared to the same time last year as U.S. showing traffic grew for the first time in 13 months, according to the latest ShowingTime Showing Index report. All four regions tracked by the Showing Index saw an uptick in buyer activity, contributing to the first nationwide year-over-year increase since July 2018. For the fourth consecutive month the Northeast Region saw its largest year-over-year increase at 5.9 percent, the biggest jump recorded in the region since March 2018. The South also saw more showing traffic, with a 2.7 percent increase in activity compared to 2018. The West Region came in with a 2.2 percent increase, its first year-over-year gain since January 2018. The Midwest recorded a more modest increase of 1.3 percent. "The trend we saw in year-over-year buyer traffic in previous months continued across the U.S.," said ShowingTime Chief Analytics Officer Daniil Cherkasskiy. "For all four regions there were more showings per listing this year compared to last year, making it the most competitive August in the last five years. If this trend continues, we are likely to see even more buyer competition this fall." The ShowingTime Showing Index, the first of its kind in the residential real estate industry, is compiled using data from property showings scheduled across the country on listings using ShowingTime products and services, providing a benchmark to track buyer demand. ShowingTime facilitates more than four million showings each month. Released monthly, the Showing Index tracks the average number of appointments received on active listings during the month. Local MLS indices are also available for select markets and are distributed to MLS and association leadership. To view the full report, visit showingtime.com/showingtime-showing-index/. About ShowingTime ShowingTime is the residential real estate industry’s leading showing management and market stats technology provider, with more than 1.2 million active listings subscribed to its services. Its showing products and services simplify the appointment scheduling process for real estate professionals, buyers and sellers, resulting in more showings, more feedback and more efficient sales. Its MarketStats division provides interactive tools and easy-to-read market reports for MLSs, associations, brokers and other real estate companies. ShowingTime products are used in more than 250 MLSs representing over 950,000 real estate professionals across the U.S. and Canada. For more information, contact us at [email protected]
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The "Black Friday" of Homebuying is Almost Here
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CoreLogic Reports Stark Contrast Between Rising Mortgage Delinquencies in Eight States while National Rate Remains at 20-Year Low
CoreLogic, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its monthly Loan Performance Insights Report. The report shows that nationally 4% of mortgages were in some stage of delinquency (30 days or more past due, including those in foreclosure) in June 2019, representing a 0.3 percentage point decline in the overall delinquency rate compared with June 2018, when it was 4.3%. As of June 2019, the foreclosure inventory rate – which measures the share of mortgages in some stage of the foreclosure process – was 0.4%, down 0.1 percentage points from June 2018. The June 2019 foreclosure inventory rate tied the prior seven months as the lowest for any month since at least January 1999. Measuring early-stage delinquency rates is important for analyzing the health of the mortgage market. To monitor mortgage performance comprehensively, CoreLogic examines all stages of delinquency, as well as transition rates, which indicate the percentage of mortgages moving from one stage of delinquency to the next. The rate for early-stage delinquencies – defined as 30 to 59 days past due – was 2.1% in June 2019, up from 2% in June 2018. The share of mortgages 60 to 89 days past due in June 2019 was 0.6%, unchanged from June 2018. The serious delinquency rate – defined as 90 days or more past due, including loans in foreclosure – was 1.3% in June 2019, down from 1.7% in June 2018. June's serious delinquency rate of 1.3% was the lowest for the month of June since 2005 when it was also 1.3%; it tied the April and May 2019 rates as the lowest for any month since it was also 1.3% in August 2005. Since early-stage delinquencies can be volatile, CoreLogic also analyzes transition rates. The share of mortgages that transitioned from current to 30 days past due was 1.1% in June 2019, up from 0.9% in June 2018. By comparison, in January 2007, just before the start of the financial crisis, the current-to-30-day transition rate was 1.2% and peaked at 2% in November 2008. "A strong economy and eight-plus years of home price growth have made mortgage foreclosure an infrequent event," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist at CoreLogic. "This backdrop will help the mortgage market limit delinquencies in most of the country whenever a downturn should start." The nation's overall delinquency remains near the lowest level since at least 1999. However, several states and metropolitan areas posted small annual increases in June. The highest gains were in Vermont (+0.7%), New Hampshire (+0.3%), Nebraska (+0.2%) and Minnesota (0.2%), while the other four states – Michigan, Iowa, Wisconsin and Connecticut – experienced a nominal gain of just 0.1%. Some metropolitan areas also recorded small increases in overall delinquency rates. Metros with the largest increases were Janesville-Beloit, Wisconsin (+2.5 percentage points) and Pine Bluff, Arkansas (+1.6 percentage points). Panama City, Florida; Altoona, Pennsylvania; and Kokomo, Indiana all experienced increases of 0.6 percentage points. "While the nation continues to post near-record-low mortgage delinquency rates, we are seeing signs of emerging stress in some states," said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "We saw rates jump in states such as Vermont, New Hampshire, Nebraska and Minnesota that weren't tied to a natural disaster." The next CoreLogic Loan Performance Insights Report will be released on October 8, 2019, featuring data for July 2019. For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog: www.corelogic.com/insights. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX), the leading provider of property insights and solutions, promotes a healthy housing market and thriving communities. Through its enhanced property data solutions, services and technologies, CoreLogic enables real estate professionals, financial institutions, insurance carriers, government agencies and other housing market participants to help millions of people find, acquire and protect their homes. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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U.S. Housing Inventory Declines for First Time in a Year
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CoreLogic Reports July Home Prices Increased by 3.6% Year Over Year
The HPI Forecast indicates annual price growth will increase 5.4% by July 2020 CoreLogic, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released the CoreLogic Home Price Index (HPI) and HPI Forecast for July 2019, which shows home prices rose both year over year and month over month. Home prices increased nationally by 3.6% from June 2018. On a month-over-month basis, prices increased by 0.5% in July 2019. (June 2019 data was revised. Revisions with public records data are standard, and to ensure accuracy, CoreLogic incorporates the newly released public data to provide updated results each month.) Home prices continue to increase on an annual basis with the CoreLogic HPI Forecast indicating annual price growth will increase by 5.4% by July 2020. On a month-over-month basis, the forecast calls for home prices to increase by 0.4% from July 2019 to August 2019. The CoreLogic HPI Forecast is a projection of home prices calculated using the CoreLogic HPI and other economic variables. Values are derived from state-level forecasts by weighting indices according to the number of owner-occupied households for each state. "Sales of new and existing homes this July were up from a year ago, supported by low mortgage rates and rising family income," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist at CoreLogic. "With the for-sale inventory remaining low in many markets, the pick-up in buying has nudged price growth up. If low interest rates and rising income continue, then we expect home-price growth will strengthen over the coming year." According to the CoreLogic Market Condition Indicators (MCI), an analysis of housing values in the country's 100 largest metropolitan areas based on housing stock, 37% of metropolitan areas have an overvalued housing market as of July 2019. The MCI analysis categorizes home prices in individual markets as undervalued, at value or overvalued, by comparing home prices to their long-run, sustainable levels, which are supported by local market fundamentals such as disposable income. As of June 2019, 23% of the top 100 metropolitan areas were undervalued, and 40% were at value. When looking at only the top 50 markets based on housing stock, 40% were overvalued, 16% were undervalued and 44% were at value. The MCI analysis defines an overvalued housing market as one in which home prices are at least 10% above the long-term, sustainable level. An undervalued housing market is one in which home prices are at least 10% below the sustainable level. During the second quarter of 2019, CoreLogic together with RTi Research of Norwalk, Connecticut, conducted an extensive survey measuring consumer-housing sentiment among millennials. The survey found that approximately 26% of this age cohort expressed an interest in buying a home in the next 12 months, but only 8% indicated a desire to sell their home within the same time frame. This means that new housing starts, or sellers from other age cohorts, will need to make up the necessary available housing stock to meet the demand. This desire to buy while housing stock is limited will continue to force prices up as buyers search for a home to purchase. "Although the rise in home prices has slowed over the past several months, we see a reacceleration over the next year to just over 5% on an annualized basis," said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "Lower rates are certainly making it more affordable to buy homes and millennial buyers are entering the market with increasing force. These positive demand drivers, which are occurring against a backdrop of persistent shortages in housing stock, are the major drivers for higher home prices, which will likely continue to rise for the foreseeable future." The next CoreLogic HPI press release, featuring August 2019 data, will be issued on Tuesday, October 1, 2019 at 8:00 a.m. ET. Methodology The CoreLogic HPI™ is built on industry-leading public record, servicing and securities real-estate databases and incorporates more than 40 years of repeat-sales transactions for analyzing home price trends. Generally released on the first Tuesday of each month with an average five-week lag, the CoreLogic HPI is designed to provide an early indication of home price trends by market segment and for the "Single-Family Combined" tier, representing the most comprehensive set of properties, including all sales for single-family attached and single-family detached properties. The indices are fully revised with each release and employ techniques to signal turning points sooner. The CoreLogic HPI provides measures for multiple market segments, referred to as tiers, based on property type, price, time between sales, loan type (conforming vs. non-conforming) and distressed sales. Broad national coverage is available from the national level down to ZIP Code, including non-disclosure states. CoreLogic HPI Forecasts™ are based on a two-stage, error-correction econometric model that combines the equilibrium home price—as a function of real disposable income per capita—with short-run fluctuations caused by market momentum, mean-reversion, and exogenous economic shocks like changes in the unemployment rate. With a 30-year forecast horizon, CoreLogic HPI Forecasts project CoreLogic HPI levels for two tiers — "Single-Family Combined" (both attached and detached) and "Single-Family Combined Excluding Distressed Sales." As a companion to the CoreLogic HPI Forecasts, Stress-Testing Scenarios align with Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review (CCAR) national scenarios to project five years of home prices under baseline, adverse and severely adverse scenarios at state, metropolitan areas and ZIP Code levels. The forecast accuracy represents a 95% statistical confidence interval with a +/- 2% margin of error for the index. About the CoreLogic Consumer Housing Sentiment Study In the second quarter of 2019, 877 renters and homeowners were surveyed by CoreLogic together with RTi Research. This study is a quarterly pulse of U.S. housing market dynamics. Each quarter, the research focuses on a different issue related to current housing topics. This first quarterly study concentrated on consumer sentiment within high-priced markets. The survey has a sampling error of +/- 3.1% at the total respondent level with a 95% confidence level. About RTi Research RTi Research is an innovative, global market research and brand strategy consultancy headquartered in Norwalk, CT. Founded in 1979, RTi has been consistently recognized by the American Marketing Association as one of the top 50 U.S. insights companies. The company serves a broad base of leading firms in Financial Services, Consumer Goods, and Pharmaceuticals as well as partnering with leading academic centers of excellence. Source: CoreLogic The data provided are for use only by the primary recipient or the primary recipient's publication or broadcast. This data may not be resold, republished or licensed to any other source, including publications and sources owned by the primary recipient's parent company without prior written permission from CoreLogic. Any CoreLogic data used for publication or broadcast, in whole or in part, must be sourced as coming from CoreLogic, a data and analytics company. For use with broadcast or web content, the citation must directly accompany first reference of the data. If the data are illustrated with maps, charts, graphs or other visual elements, the CoreLogic logo must be included on screen or website. For questions, analysis or interpretation of the data, contact Alyson Austin at [email protected] or Allyse Sanchez at [email protected] Data provided may not be modified without the prior written permission of CoreLogic. Do not use the data in any unlawful manner. The data are compiled from public records, contributory databases and proprietary analytics, and its accuracy is dependent upon these sources. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX), the leading provider of property insights and solutions, promotes a healthy housing market and thriving communities. Through its enhanced property data solutions, services and technologies, CoreLogic enables real estate professionals, financial institutions, insurance carriers, government agencies and other housing market participants to help millions of people find, acquire and protect their homes. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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Pending Home Sales Decline 2.5% in July
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Most Areas Targeted for New Opportunity Zone Redevelopment Incentives Have Home Prices Well Below National Levels
New tax breaks are aimed at spurring improvement in low-income Opportunity Zone areas of the United States; almost half have median home prices below $150,000 IRVINE, Calif. – August 29, 2019 — ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database and first property data provider of Data-as-a-Service (DaaS), today released a special report analyzing qualified Opportunity Zones established by Congress in the Tax Cuts and Jobs act of 2017 (see full methodology below). In this report, ATTOM looked at nearly 3,100 zones with sufficient sales data to analyze, which included areas with at least five home sales in the second quarter of 2019 as well as an average of at least five sales per quarter since Q3 2018. The analysis found that roughly 80 percent of those zones had median home prices in the second quarter of 2019 that were below the national figure of $266,000 and that half had median prices of less than $150,000. The report further compared Opportunity Zones to surrounding regions and found that median Q2 2019 prices in about one in four zones were less than 50 percent of the typical value in the Metropolitan Statistical Areas where they exist. "Opportunity Zones are among the poorest areas of the country, with some of the lowest home prices. This should come as no surprise because the zones are designed to be in or alongside economically distressed neighborhoods," said Todd Teta, chief product officer with ATTOM Data Solutions. "But the differences between these and other areas in most parts of the nation are stark. The numbers provide key benchmarks for how much room there is for these areas to grow and how much new investment they need." High-level findings from the report include: States with the highest percentage of census tracts meeting Opportunity Zone requirements include Wyoming (17 percent), Mississippi (15 percent), Alabama (13 percent), North Dakota (12 percent) and New Mexico (12 percent). Washington, DC, also is among the leaders (14 percent). Nationwide, 10 percent of all tracts qualify. Among the 3,073 Opportunity Zones with sufficient data to analyze, California has the most, with 374, followed by Florida (317), Texas (164), Pennsylvania (154), North Carolina (145) and Tennessee (138). Of the tracts analyzed, 47 percent had a median price in Q2 2019 of less than $150,000. The median ranged from $150,000 to $199,999 in 17 percent, from $200,000 up to the national median of $266,000 in 16 percent and more than $266,000 in 19 percent. Within Opportunity Zones, 86 percent had median Q2 2019 sales prices that were less than the median sales price for the surrounding Metropolitan Statistical Area. Roughly 26 percent had median sales prices less than half the figure for the MSA. Only 14 percent had median sales prices that were equal to or above the median sales price in the MSA. States that had highest percentage of Opportunity Zone tracts with a median price less the half the MSA figure included Alabama (55 percent), Pennsylvania (53 percent), Illinois (51 percent), Ohio (47 percent) and Georgia (45 percent). States with the smallest percentages included Washington (1 percent), Nevada (3 percent), Oregon (4 percent) Colorado (4 percent) and Indiana (4 percent). Regionally, the Midwest had the highest rate of Opportunity Zone tracts with a median home price of less than $150,000 (73 percent), followed by the South (57 percent), the Northeast (53 percent) and the West (13 percent). The Midwest also had the highest percentage of Opportunity Zone tracts where the median price was less than that of surrounding MSAs (89 percent), followed by the Northeast (87 percent), the South (85 percent) and the West (85 percent). In addition, the report found that among Opportunity Zones with at least 10 sales in each of the five latest quarters, 41 had Q2 2019 medians of $400,000 or more. They included areas of King County, WA; Denver County, CO; Coconino County, AZ; Deschutes County, OR and Alameda and Contra Costa counties in California. At the opposite end, 50 zones had Q2 2019 medians of less than $50,000. They included areas of Philadelphia, PA; Baltimore, MD; Montgomery, AL; Duval County, FL and Jefferson County, AL. Report methodology The ATTOM Data Solutions Opportunity Zones analysis is based on home sales price data derived from recorded sales deeds. Statistics for previous quarters are revised when each new report is issued as more deed data becomes available. ATTOM Data Solutions compared median home prices in tracts designated as Opportunity Zones by the Internal Revenue Service. Except where noted, tracts were used for the analysis if they had at least five sales in Q2 2019, plus an average of five sales per quarter for the latest four quarters. Median household income data for tracts and counties comes from surveys taken the U.S. Census Bureau (www.census.gov) from 2013 through 2017. The list of designated Qualified Opportunity Zones is located at U.S. Department of the Treasury. Regions are based on designations by the Census Bureau. Hawaii and Alaska, which the bureau designates as part of the Pacific region, were included the West region for this report. About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, APIs, market trends, marketing lists, match & append and introducing the first property data deliver solution, a cloud-based data platform that streamlines data management – Data-as-a-Service (DaaS).
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Northeast Region Sees Third Consecutive Month of Increased Year-Over-Year Buyer Traffic in July as U.S. Showing Activity Continues to Stabilize
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Existing-Home Sales Climb 2.5% in July
WASHINGTON (August 21, 2019) – Existing-home sales strengthened in July, a positive reversal after total sales were down slightly in the previous month, according to the National Association of Realtors. Although Northeast transactions declined, the other three major U.S. regions recorded sales increases, including vast growth in the West last month. Total existing-home sales, completed transactions that include single-family homes, townhomes, condominiums and co-ops, rose 2.5% from June to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.42 million in July. Overall sales are up 0.6% from a year ago (5.39 million in July 2018). "Falling mortgage rates are improving housing affordability and nudging buyers into the market," said Lawrence Yun, NAR's chief economist. However, he added that the supply of affordable housing is severely low. "The shortage of lower-priced homes have markedly pushed up home prices." Home price appreciation has been much stronger in the lower-price tier compared to homes sold in the upper-price tier, based on the analysis of proprietary deed records data from Black Knight, Inc. and Realtors Property Resource®. Of the same homes that were sold in 2018 that were purchased in 2012 in 13 large metro areas (repeat sales transactions), the lower half of the market had increased by more than 100% in 2018 in metro areas like Atlanta-Sandy-Springs-Roswell, Ga. (165%), Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Colo. (103%), Miami-Fort-Lauderdale, Fla. (119%) and Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, Fla. (125%). The median home price for homes purchased in the upper half of the market in these same metro areas in 2012 increased at a much slower pace when sold in 2018. "Clearly, the inventory of moderately-priced homes is inadequate and more home building is needed," said Yun. "Some new apartments could be converted into condominiums thereby helping with the supply, especially in light of new federal rules permitting a wider use of Federal Housing Administration (FHA) mortgages to buy condo properties." The median existing-home price for all housing types in July was $280,800, up 4.3% from July 2018 ($269,300). July's price increase marks the 89th straight month of year-over-year gains. Total housing inventory at the end of July decreased to 1.89 million, down from 1.92 million existing-homes available for sale in June, and a 1.6% decrease from 1.92 million one year ago. Unsold inventory is at a 4.2-month supply at the current sales pace, down from the 4.4 month-supply recorded in June and down from the 4.3-month supply recorded in July of 2018. Properties typically remained on the market for 29 days in July, up from 27 days in June and up from 27 days in July of 2018. Fifty-one percent of homes sold in July were on the market for less than a month. According to Freddie Mac, the average commitment rate for a 30-year, conventional, fixed-rate mortgage decreased to 3.77% in July, down from 3.80% in June. The average commitment rate across all of 2018 was 4.54%. "Mortgage rates are important to consumers, but so is confidence about the nation's overall economic outlook," Yun continued. "Home buying is a serious long term decision and current low or even lower future mortgage rates may not in themselves meaningfully boost sales unless accompanied by improved consumer confidence." First-time buyers were responsible for 32% of sales in July, down from 35% the month prior and about equal to the 32% recorded in July 2018. NAR's 2018 Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers – released in late 2018 – revealed that the annual share of first-time buyers was 33%. As the share of first-time buyers rose, individual investors or second-home buyers, who account for many cash sales purchased 11% of homes in July, up from 10% recorded in June 2019 and down from 12% recorded in July a year ago. All-cash sales accounted for 19% of transactions in July, up from June and down from July of 2018 (16% and 20%, respectively). Distressed sales – foreclosures and short sales – represented 2% of sales in July, unchanged from June but down from 3% in July 2018. Less than 1% of July 2019 sales were short sales. "Present rates have opened the market for a number of potential buyers who couldn't afford a home just a year ago," said NAR President John Smaby, a second-generation Realtor® from Edina, Minnesota, and broker at Edina Realty. "Additionally, NAR has been working with the FHA for years to establish new condominium loan policies. Our hard work has paid off, and this change will begin benefiting buyers, sellers and our members as soon as this fall." Regional Breakdown Compared to June, existing-home sales recorded in July rose in the Midwest, South and West, but fell slightly in the Northeast region. Compared to last year, July sales dropped in the Northeast and West while experiencing modest gains in the Midwest and South. Median home prices rose from a year ago, except in the Northeast. July existing-home sales in the Northeast decreased 2.9% to an annual rate of 660,000, a 4.3% decline from a year ago. The median price in the Northeast was $305,800, down 1.0% from July 2018. In the Midwest, existing-home sales edged up 1.6% to an annual rate of 1.27 million, which is a 0.8% increase from July 2018. The median price in the Midwest was $226,300, an 8.1% surge from a year ago. Existing-home sales in the South increased 1.8% to an annual rate of 2.31 million in July, up 2.7% from a year ago. The median price in the South was $245,100, up 5.2% from one year ago. Existing-home sales in the West shot up 8.3% to an annual rate of 1.18 million in July, just 0.8% below a year ago. The median price in the West was $408,000, up 3.7% from July 2018. Single-family and Condo/Co-op Sales Single-family home sales sat at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.84 million in July, up from 4.71 million in June and up 1.0% from a year ago. The median existing single-family home price was $284,000 in July 2019, up 4.5% from July 2018. Existing condominium and co-op sales were recorded at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 580,000 units in July, about equal to the rate from the prior month and down 3.3% from a year ago. The median existing condo price was $254,300 in July, which is up 2.5% from a year ago. The National Association of Realtors® is America's largest trade association, representing more than 1.3 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.
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CoreLogic Reports U.S. Overall Delinquency Rate Remains Steady at 20-Year Low in May
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U.S. Housing Market Deja Vu
Increased demand spurred by lower interest rates and fewer homes coming to market reverse 10 months of inventory growth SANTA CLARA, Calif., Aug. 13, 2019 -- Lower interest rates are prompting more buyers to come into the market, putting pressure on an already tight U.S. housing market and reversing 10 months of national inventory growth, according to realtor.com's July 2019 Monthly Housing Trend report released today. The report, which tracks key trends across the market, including the national median home price, days on market and inventory, showed flat inventory growth, which could lead to inventory declines sooner than originally predicted. In July, active listings on realtor.com were flat, following slowing growth since the start of the year. Newly listed properties were down 7 percent from a year ago. The national median home price in July was $315,000, up 5.5 percent from a year ago and a decrease from last year's year-over-year growth of 8.7 percent. Additionally, July prices were down 0.2 percent from June, marking the earliest seasonal slowdown in home prices since 2012. The median number of days on market in July was 58, the same as a year ago. "July's data highlight tension in the housing markets between buyers eager to take advantage of lower mortgage rates and potential sellers concerned about slowing price growth," said George Ratiu, realtor.com's senior economist. "The decline in newly listed properties suggests that some would-be sellers are stepping back from the market, during the peak buying season, when most people are searching for their next home." Ratiu noted that although overall housing inventory had been growing, the number of homes in the entry-level segment declined. Now that trends are shifting for the market as a whole, he said challenges for entry-level and first-time buyers are mounting, including faster price growth ahead. The inventory of properties priced below $200,000 in July decreased 9.9 percent year-over-year, while at the same time, the inventory of homes priced above $750,000 increased 6.6 percent. Competition for entry-level homes continues to be tight -- homes priced below $200,000 only spent 56 days on the market, whereas properties priced over $750,000 spent 81 days on the market. Despite these challenges, some millennials are finding success. The share of millennial mortgage originations increased to 46 percent from 43 percent last year, according to realtor.com's second quarter Generational Propensity report. The report found the median home purchased by millennials was priced at $248,000, up 5 percent year-over-year, a bigger increase than either Gen X or boomers had in home purchase price. Looking across generational cohorts, the larger gains in the price of homes purchased by millennials reflect both the intense competition at the entry-level price point and the fact that some millennials have been delaying major life milestones (e.g. starting families, forming households, having children), and are skipping the starter home to purchase larger, trade-up homes. The report also found that while Gen X and boomers have increased their down payment percentages, millennials saw the average down payment slip to 8.2 percent from 8.9 percent a year ago. This increased the size of the typical millennial loan amount to $227,000 from $215,000. Lower mortgage rates are helping to cushion the impact of buying a higher-priced home and making additional debt more affordable. The monthly mortgage amount that millennials paid on a newly purchased home fell to $1,099 from $1,131 year-over-year. About realtor.com® Realtor.com®, The Home of Home Search, offers the most MLS-listed for-sale listings among national real estate portals, and access to information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. Through its Opcity platform, realtor.com® uses data science and machine learning to connect consumers with a real estate professional based on their specific buying and selling needs. Realtor.com® pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today is a trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers by making all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com.
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Luxury Home Prices Up 1% Amid Falling Sales and Surging Supply in the Second Quarter
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296,458 U.S. Properties with Foreclosure Filings in First Six Months of 2019, Down 18 Percent from a Year Ago
Foreclosure Starts Decrease Nationwide, But Increase in 42 Percent of Local Markets; Q2 2019 Foreclosure Activity Below Pre-Recession Levels in 62 Percent of Markets IRVINE, Calif. – August 8, 2019 — ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database and first property data provider of Data-as-a-Service (DaaS), today released its Midyear 2019 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report, which shows a total of 296,458 U.S. properties with foreclosure filings — default notices, scheduled auctions or bank repossessions — in the first six months of 2019, down 18 percent from the same period a year ago and down 82 percent from a peak of 1,654,634 in the first six months of 2010. Counter to the national trend, 36 of the 220 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report (16 percent) posted a year-over-year increase in foreclosure activity in the first six months of 2019, including Buffalo, New York (up 33 percent); Orlando, Florida (up 32 percent); Jacksonville, Florida (up 18 percent); Miami, Florida (up 7 percent); and Tampa-St. Petersburg, Florida (up 5 percent). "Our midyear 2019 foreclosure activity helps to show an overall view on how foreclosure activity is trending downward," said Todd Teta, chief product officer at ATTOM Data Solutions. "Of course, you still have pockets across the nation where foreclosure activity is seeing some flare-ups. Foreclosure starts is a good indication of markets to watch. For instance, in looking at the largest markets across the nation with the greatest annual increase in foreclosure starts, 4 out of the 5 markets were in Florida. " New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland post highest state foreclosure rates Nationwide 0.22 percent of all housing units (one in every 457) had a foreclosure filing in the first six months of 2019. States with the highest foreclosure rates in the first half of 2019 were New Jersey (0.54 percent); Delaware (0.46 percent); Maryland (0.43 percent); Florida (0.39 percent); and Illinois (0.38 percent). Other states with first-half 2019 foreclosure rates among the 10 highest nationwide were South Carolina (0.33 percent); Connecticut (0.32 percent); Ohio (0.30 percent); Nevada (0.26 percent); and New Mexico (0.26 percent). Atlantic City, Jacksonville, Trenton, with highest metro foreclosure rates Among 220 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report, those with the highest foreclosure rates in the first half of 2019 were Atlantic City, New Jersey (0.92 percent of all housing units with a foreclosure filing); Jacksonville, Florida (0.54 percent); Trenton, New Jersey (0.52 percent); Rockford, Illinois (0.51 percent); and Lakeland, Florida (0.51 percent). Other metro areas with foreclosure rates ranking among the top 10 highest in the first half of 2019 were Columbia, South Carolina (0.49 percent); Ocala, Florida (0.49 percent); Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (.48 percent); Fayetteville, North Carolina (0.47 percent); and Baltimore, Maryland (0.44 percent). First-half foreclosure starts down nationwide, up in 42 percent of local markets A total of 177,015 U.S. properties started the foreclosure process in the first six months of 2019, down 8 percent from the first half of 2018 and down 84 percent from a peak of 1,074,471 in the first half of 2009. Counter to the national trend, 16 states posted a year-over-year increase in foreclosure starts in the first half of 2019, including Mississippi (up 56 percent); Florida (up 28 percent); Georgia (up 22 percent); Arkansas (up 21 percent); and Louisiana (up 19 percent). Also counter to the national trend, 92 of the 217 metro areas analyzed in the report (42 percent) posted year-over-year increases in foreclosure starts in the first half of 2019, including Miami, Florida (up 32 percent); Tampa-St. Petersburg, Florida (up 18 percent); Atlanta, Georgia (up 16 percent); Washington D.C. (up 8 percent); and Denver, Colorado (up 6 percent). Q2 2019 foreclosure activity below pre-recession levels in 62 percent of markets A total of 152,760 U.S. properties had a foreclosure filing in Q2 2019, down 6 percent from the previous quarter and down 19 percent from a year ago. The second quarter of 2019 was the eleventh consecutive quarter in which U.S. foreclosure activity was below the pre-recession average of 278,912 properties with foreclosure filings per quarter in 2006 and 2007. Foreclosure activity in the second quarter of 2019 was below pre-recession averages in 136 of the 220 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report (62 percent), including Denver, Colorado (92 percent below); Detroit, Michigan (89 percent below); Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas (81 percent below); Atlanta, Georgia (80 percent below); and Memphis, Tennessee (80 percent below). Counter to the national trend, 84 of the 220 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report (38 percent) posted Q2 2019 foreclosure activity totals above their pre-recession averages, including New Orleans, Louisiana (56 percent above); Birmingham, Alabama (26 percent above); Washington, D.C. (22 percent above); Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (6 percent above); New York-Newark-Jersey City (up 4 percent). Average foreclosure timeline drops to lowest level since Q3 2018 Properties foreclosed in the second quarter of 2019 took an average of 716 days from the first public foreclosure notice to complete the foreclosure process, down from 835 days in the previous quarter and down from 720 days in the second quarter of 2018. States with the longest average foreclosure timelines for foreclosures completed in Q2 2019 were Hawaii (1,611 days), Indiana (1,360 days), Florida (1,073 days), New York (1,057 days), and New Jersey (982 days). States with the shortest average foreclosure timelines for foreclosures completed in Q2 2019 were Mississippi (195 days), Minnesota (226 days), Virginia (228 days), Alaska (242 days), and Maine (277 days). About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, APIs, market trends, marketing lists, match & append and introducing the first property data deliver solution, a cloud-based data platform that streamlines data management – Data-as-a-Service (DaaS).
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Metro Home Prices Increase in 91% of Metro Areas in Second Quarter of 2019
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CoreLogic Reports June Home Prices Increased by 3.4% Year Over Year
CoreLogic, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released the CoreLogic Home Price Index (HPI) and HPI Forecast for June 2019, which shows home prices rose both year over year and month over month. Home prices increased nationally by 3.4% from June 2018. On a month-over-month basis, prices increased by 0.4% in June 2019. (May 2019 data was revised. Revisions with public records data are standard, and to ensure accuracy, CoreLogic incorporates the newly released public data to provide updated results each month.) Single-family home prices stand at an all-time high and continue to increase on an annual basis, with the CoreLogic HPI Forecast indicating annual price growth will increase by 5.2% from June 2019 to June 2020. On a month-over-month basis, the forecast calls for home prices to increase by 0.5% from June 2019 to July 2019. The CoreLogic HPI Forecast is a projection of home prices calculated using the CoreLogic HPI and other economic variables. Values are derived from state-level forecasts by weighting indices according to the number of owner-occupied households for each state. "Tepid home sales have caused home prices to rise at the slowest pace for the first half of a year since 2011," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist at CoreLogic. "Price growth continues to be faster for lower-priced homes, as first-time buyers and investors are both actively seeking entry-level homes. With incomes up and current mortgage rates about 0.8 percentage points below what they were one year ago, home sales should have a better sales pace in the second half of 2019 than a year earlier, leading to a quickening in price growth over the next year." According to the CoreLogic Market Condition Indicators (MCI), an analysis of housing values in the country's 100 largest metropolitan areas based on housing stock, 38% of metropolitan areas have an overvalued housing market as of June 2019. The MCI analysis categorizes home prices in individual markets as undervalued, at value or overvalued, by comparing home prices to their long-run, sustainable levels, which are supported by local market fundamentals such as disposable income. As of June 2019, 24% of the top 100 metropolitan areas were undervalued, and 38% were at value. When looking at only the top 50 markets based on housing stock, 42% were overvalued, 16% were undervalued and 42% were at value. The MCI analysis defines an overvalued housing market as one in which home prices are at least 10% above the long-term, sustainable level. An undervalued housing market is one in which home prices are at least 10% below the sustainable level. During the second quarter of 2019, CoreLogic together with RTi Research of Norwalk, Connecticut, conducted an extensive survey measuring consumer-housing sentiment among various millennial age cohorts. The study found home-price increases in lower-cost homes disproportionately impact older millennials (ages 30 - 39). Additionally, this cohort is significantly more active in searching for a new home than any other age group. Nearly half (45%) say they purchased a home in the past three years, while 25% say they will likely do so within the next year. While affordability concerns drive older millennials toward renting, they have more positive market perceptions than older generations and 37% say purchasing a home within their market is at least somewhat affordable. "Millennial homebuyers are no longer a trend on the industry horizon. In fact, they are the new, first-time homebuyers of today. However, only about half of recent millennial buyers were satisfied with the number of options of available homes in their market or price range," said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "Affordable housing continues to be a growing issue. A deeper look at the data shows that 43% of those surveyed indicated they couldn't afford to buy a new home or are concerned they won't be able to." About the CoreLogic Consumer Housing Sentiment Study In the second quarter of 2019, 508 Millennial renters and homeowners were surveyed by CoreLogic together with RTi Research. This study is a quarterly pulse of U.S. housing market dynamics. Each quarter, the research focuses on a different issue related to current housing topics. This first quarterly study concentrated on consumer sentiment within high-priced markets. The survey has a sampling error of +/- 3.1% at the total respondent level with a 95% confidence level. About RTi Research RTi Research is an innovative, global market research and brand strategy consultancy headquartered in Norwalk, CT. Founded in 1979, RTi has been consistently recognized by the American Marketing Association as one of the top 50 U.S. insights companies. The company serves a broad base of leading firms in Financial Services, Consumer Goods, and Pharmaceuticals as well as partnering with leading academic centers of excellence. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX), the leading provider of property insights and solutions, promotes a healthy housing market and thriving communities. Through its enhanced property data solutions, services and technologies, CoreLogic enables real estate professionals, financial institutions, insurance carriers, government agencies and other housing market participants to help millions of people find, acquire and protect their homes. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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New ATTOM Data Solutions Analysis Examines the Grocery Store Impact on the U.S. Housing Market
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Big City Metros Fall Off Realtor.com's 2019 Hottest ZIP Codes Report
ZIP code 49505 Grand Rapids, Mich., is ranked No. 1, followed by 68144 Omaha, Neb. and 83704, Boise, Idaho SANTA CLARA, Calif., July 31, 2019 -- The hottest ZIP codes in America are on the move from big cities like San Francisco and New York to quieter metros with a more suburban feel such as Omaha, Neb. and Goffstown, N.H., according to realtor.com's 2019 hottest ZIP codes ranking released today. In its fifth annual report, five ZIP codes in up and coming neighborhoods made their debut on the list boosted by extremely low home prices and even more millennial home buyers. The 2019 hottest ZIP codes America, in rank order, are: 49505 Grand Rapids, Mich.; 68144, Omaha, Neb.; 83704, Boise, Idaho; 66203 Shawnee, Kan.; 14609 Rochester, N.Y.; 48154 Livonia, Mich.; 02176 Melrose, Mass.; 76018 Arlington, Texas; 03045 Goffstown, N.H.; and 80916 Colorado Springs, Colo. Homes in this year's top 10 sell in an average of 17 days, 40 days faster than the rest of the country and 20 days faster than their respective metros, on average. Realtor.com® users view homes in these markets 3 times more often than homes in the rest of the country and 1.9 times more often than in their respective metro areas, on average. Affordability ignites even more demand in smaller, less dense locales As buyers continue to be priced out of big cities, demand is sparking up in smaller, less dense markets where housing is more affordable. Last year, the top 10 hottest ZIP codes in America included towns on the outskirts of some of the largest, most densely populated cities in the country such as New York and San Francisco. But these markets rotated off the list this year to make way for Omaha, Neb. and Manchester, N.H. Smaller metros from previous years such as: Boise, Idaho; Kansas City, Mo. and Colorado Springs, Colo. In fact, this year's top 10 hottest markets have half of the total number of households of the market's on last year's list and 7 percent fewer households per square mile. "Even though buyers are moving to smaller markets, they are looking to retain an urban lifestyle by living closer to the city center. This tells us that today's home buyers are trying to have it all -- proximity to downtown, room to grow, and affordability -- and they're finding it outside of the biggest cities in the U.S.," said Danielle Hale, chief economist for realtor.com®. "The average commute distance from this year's hottest 10 ZIPs to their downtown area is 9 miles, which is 31 percent or 4 miles closer compared to last year's top 10." Newbie ZIPs bring new trends to the top 10 Among the top 10 hottest ZIPs in America, five are making their debut on the list this year, including: No.1 Grand Rapids, Mich. (49505); No. 4 Shawnee, Kan. (66203); No. 5 Rochester, N.Y. (14609); No. 8 Arlington, Texas (76018); and No. 9 Goffstown, N.H. (03045). Although some of the traditional drivers of market hotness are represented in these areas, there are also some emerging trends of extremely low home prices, developing local economies, and even larger populations of millennials. Affordability has been a key factor driving realtor.com®'s hottest ZIP codes for the last five years. But among 2019's new ZIPs, the trend is even more extreme. When compared to the top 10 as a whole the average median listing price for the five new ZIPs is 36 percent less expensive. They are also 32 percent less expensive than both the metro and the national median home price. Although these areas are thriving in many ways, local economic indicators signal these up-and-coming neighborhoods still have a way to go. The median income of the five newbie ZIPs is $64,000, 9 percent lower than the median of the others on the list. But their average unemployment rate is strong at 3.2 percent, which is 0.2 percentage points lower than the average of the returning ZIPs, and 0.4 percentage points lower than the national rate of 3.6 percent. The number of households in these markets is projected to grow by 4.3 percent this year, faster than the national rate of 1.1 percent, but not quite as fast as expected in the returning ZIP codes, projected to grow at a rate of 7.6 percent. Millennials have played a critical part of market hotness for some time, but their role is even larger in these new ZIPs. In fact, on average, the millennial homeownership rate in these areas is 5 percent higher than their returning counterparts and exceeds the national rate by 13 percent. Overall trends driving hotness in the top 10 Among this year's top 10 hottest markets in America, there are some consistent factors driving their popularity, including: large numbers of high earning millennials scooping up homes, relatively affordable home prices and strong local job markets. In the top 10 ZIPs, millennials' salaries are on average, 13 percent greater than the national millennial median income. They also make up the greatest share of homebuyers taking on a mortgage, averaging 39 percent. Part of the appeal of these top 10 ZIPs is their relatively affordable average home price of $272,000, well below the current national median of $316,000. Another factor contributing to these hot housing market is residents have money to spend. On average, resident incomes in each of these areas are 6.5 percent higher than the national median. Additionally, jobs are expected to grow 1.3 percent this year, exceeding the projected national growth of 1.0 percent. 2019 Hottest ZIP Codes in America 1) 49505 - Grand Rapids, Mich. – Western Michigan has once again taken the top spot on realtor.com®'s hottest ZIP codes ranking, this time with ZIP 49505. Located just north of downtown Grand Rapids, this ZIP runs along the Grand River and includes plenty of green space with the Kent Country Club, and four large parks. Its strong school system, which includes City High Middle School (GreatSchools rating of 9/10), attracts many to the family-oriented area. Housing stats: Homes in this Grand Rapids ZIP sell in 10 days on average, with a median listing price of $178,050, which is up 11.3 percent year-over-year. Millennials make up the dominant buyer segment, where they account for 48 percent of new purchase mortgages. Millennials in this Grand Rapids ZIP make slightly less than the national median for millennials at $58,667 and $62,280, respectively. 2) 68144 - Omaha, Neb. – Coming in at No. 2, ZIP 68144 is centrally located just 12 miles west of downtown Omaha, with easy access to the interstate, and borders along Zorinsky Lake. Affordable housing and high-paying jobs at companies like Berkshire Hathaway, Union Pacific Railroad, and Werner Enterprises are attracting many "boomerang buyers" back to the area after living in other more expensive parts of the country. With a solid mix of both high-end and starter homes, access to downtown Omaha, and a strong school system, which includes Harvey Oaks Elementary School (GreatSchools rating of 8/10), this area has earned its spot as one of the hottest ZIPs in the nation. Housing Stats: Homes in 68144 sell in 21 days on average, with a median listing price of $238,950, which is up 6.2 percent over last year. Millennials make up the dominant buying segment in the area, where they account for 43 percent of new purchase mortgages. Millennials in 68144 make significantly more than the national median for millennials at $73,902 and $62,280, respectively. 3) 83704 Boise, Idaho – Boise is a vibrant, active city, with a mild four-season climate that allows residents to enjoy the local mountains, rivers, and lakes year-round, while also establishing itself as a new tech hotspot. ZIP code 83704 sits on Boise's western edge and runs along Route 20. As more Californians seek lower housing costs, many are buying homes in Idaho where the sunny climate and local tech employers, such as Micron Technology, are strong draws. Boise is no stranger to realtor.com®'s Hottest ZIP Codes list, this ZIP was No. 6 in 2018. Housing Stats: Homes in 83704 sell in an average of 14 days, with a median listing price of $289,950, which is up 5.5 percent year-over-year. The dominant buyer segment in the area is slightly older at 35- to 44-years-old. However, buyers aged 25- to 34-years old still make up 28 percent of new purchase mortgages. Millennials in 83704 earn significantly less than the national median for millennials at $50,581 and $63,174, respectively. 4) 66203 Shawnee, Kan. – Sitting southwest of downtown Kansas City, Mo., on the Kansas side, is ZIP 66203 a quintessential Midwestern suburb known as "Old Shawnee." This is 66203's first appearance on the hottest markets, and it offers a walkable downtown with local shops and restaurants as well as affordable home prices. Kansas City has grown in popularity over the years due to its alluring downtown that houses museums, dining, shopping, and extensive nightlife, and 66203 is an affordable alternative to last year's No. 8 ZIP in Overland Park with even easier access to the city. Housing Stats: Homes in 66203 sell in an average of 13 days and have a median listing price of $220,050, which is up 16.4 percent year-over-year. Millennials make up the dominant buyer segment in this area, where they account for 43 percent of new purchase mortgages. Millennials in 66203 earn slightly less than the national median for millennials at $61,582 and $62,280, respectively. 5) 14609 - Rochester, N.Y. – Nestled along the southern shore of Lake Ontario and split in half by the Genesee River is the pictorial city of Rochester, which is home to ZIP 14609 -- a first timer to the list. As a booming area for both medical and education industries, 14609 draws many young professionals with its tree-lined streets, high walkability, and access to nightlife. Rochester Regional Health and the University of Rochester are two of the metro area's largest employers, but Rochester is also home to the headquarters for Wegmans Food Markets, which was ranked No. 3 on Fortune's annual "Best Companies to Work For." Housing Stats: Homes in 14609 sell in 17 days on average and have a median listing price of $125,050, which is up 13.7 percent year-over-year. Millennials make up the dominant buyer segment in the area where they account for 43 percent of new purchase mortgages. However, millennials make significantly less than the national median millennial at $44,438 and $62,280, respectively. 6) 48154 - Livonia, Mich. – A western suburb of the Motor City, Livonia combines the best parts of suburban living with close proximity to the great attractions of Detroit. ZIP 48154 offers an easy 20 mile commute to downtown destinations such as the Detroit Institute of Art and the historic Eastern Market. Livonia also is equally close to many of the major employment centers scattered throughout the broader metro area, such as the headquarters of Ford Motor Company in Dearborn, Mich. Housing Stats: Homes in 48154 sell in an average of 17 days and have a median listing price of $254,950, which is up 6.2 percent year-over-year. Millennials are the dominant buyer segment in the area where they make up 36 percent of new purchase mortgages. Millennials in this Livonia ZIP make significantly more than the national median for millennials at $96,855 and $62,280, respectively. 7) 02176 - Melrose, Mass. – Located 10 miles north of Boston is the quaint gas-lamp lined city of Melrose. Boston's abundance of universities and colleges feed the area's demand for high-paying jobs, especially in pharmaceutical and medical industries where Hallmark Health System and Melrose-Wakefield Hospital are two of the area's largest employers. A strong school system, which includes Hoover Elementary School (GreatSchools rating of 7/10), draws many to the area, but the ZIP of 02176 is beyond most first-time home buyers' budgets, so many turn to renting until they are able to afford purchasing a home. Melrose is no stranger to realtor.com®'s Hottest ZIP Codes list, it was No. 7 in 2016. Housing stats: Homes in Melrose sell in an average of 18 days and have a median listing price of $629,050, down 1.7 percent year-over-year. The dominant buyer segment remains millennials who account for 43 percent of new purchase mortgages. Millennials in this ZIP have a median income of $98,803, which is $36,523 higher than the national median millennial income of $62,280. 8) 76018 - Arlington, Texas – Sitting cozy between Dallas and Fort Worth is the thriving city of Arlington, home to this year's No. 8 hottest ZIP, 76018. This is 76018's first time making it onto realtor.com®'s hottest ZIPs list. ZIP 76018 is seven miles from Globe Life Park - home of the Texas Rangers baseball team, as well as six miles from AT&T Stadium - home of the Dallas Cowboys football team, the most valuable sports franchise in the world. Arlington ISD and the University of Texas at Arlington are two of the area's largest employers. However, ZIP 76018 is only 19 miles from Fort Worth and 25 miles from Dallas, offering a plethora of employment options to those willing to commute. Housing Stats: Homes in this Arlington ZIP sell in 20 days on average and have a median listing price of $215,050, which is up 7.5 percent year-over-year. Millennials make up the dominant buyer segment in this area where they account for 34 percent of new purchase mortgages. Millennials in Arlington also make slightly more than the national median for millennials at $64,023 and $62,280, respectively. 9) 03045 - Goffstown, N.H. – Nestled an hour and a half north of Boston and just west of Manchester, N.H. is the historic, tree-lined town of Goffstown which is home to ZIP 03045. This is 03045's first time making it onto realtor.com®'s hottest ZIP codes list. The area offers residents a close-knit community, complete with parks and outdoors space, and a strong school system which includes Goffstown High School (GreatSchools rating of 7/10). Affordable homes with access to a walkable downtown that is lined with historic brick buildings that house many of the town's restaurants and shops, make it a quintessential New England town. Housing Stats: Homes in this Goffstown ZIP sell in 22 days on average and have a median listing price of $325,050, up 4.9 percent year-over-year. Millennials make up the dominant buyer segment in this area where they account for 43 percent of new purchase mortgages. Millennials in Goffstown earn significantly more than the national median for millenials at $105,449 and $62,280, respectively. 10) 80916 - Colorado Springs, Colo. – Located 70 miles south of Denver on the eastern side of the Rocky Mountains, lies the thriving outdoor-centric city of Colorado Springs with ZIP 80916 sitting on the southeastern portion of the city. This area draws a diverse nature-loving crowd with its affordable housing compared to its sister-city to the north, Denver. Colorado Springs is replete with local breweries and tasting rooms as well as many boutique restaurants that cater to the area's healthy living lifestyle. Major employers for the area include the United States Air Force Academy, Fort Carson, and nearby Peterson Air Force Base. Housing Stats: Homes in this Colorado Springs ZIP sell in an average of 21 days and have a median listing price of $245,050, which is up 2.5 percent year-over-year. Millennials make up the dominant buyer segment in the area, where they account for 34 percent of new purchase mortgages. Millennials in Colorado Springs make significantly less than the national median for millennials at $47,819 and $62,280, respectively. About realtor.com® Realtor.com®, The Home of Home Search℠, offers the most MLS-listed for-sale listings among national real estate portals, and access to information, tools and professional expertise that help people move confidently through every step of their home journey. Through its Opcity platform, realtor.com® uses data science and machine learning to connect consumers with a real estate professional based on their specific buying and selling needs. Realtor.com® pioneered the world of digital real estate 20 years ago, and today is a trusted resource for home buyers, sellers and dreamers by making all things home simple, efficient and enjoyable. Realtor.com® is operated by News Corp [Nasdaq: NWS, NWSA] [ASX: NWS, NWSLV] subsidiary Move, Inc. under a perpetual license from the National Association of REALTORS®. For more information, visit realtor.com.
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Pending Home Sales Climb 2.8% in June
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June's Northeast Region Buyer Traffic Shows Modest Improvement as Demand in Other Areas Remains Sluggish, Consistent with Seasonal Patterns
Modest Year-Over-Year Dips in Buyer Traffic Seen in Three of Four U.S. Regions July 24, 2019 – For the second consecutive month, the Northeast Region reported a more modest year-over-year increase in buyer traffic while the rest of the U.S. saw signs of showing activity stabilizing, according to the latest ShowingTime Showing Index® report. The 0.9 percent year-over-year increase in the Northeast is a positive sign for the region that had, until May, seen a full year of slower activity. Though the West, South and Midwest regions each saw drops in year-over-year activity, the declines were more modest compared to prior months. The West Region's 5.8 percent decline is the smallest percentage decline in the region for more than a year, while the South's 1.5 percent dip is the lowest since September 2018 – the last time the region saw a year-over-year increase in buyer activity. "Year-over-year showing traffic continues to stabilize, as June's overall activity was in line with June 2018 while the Northeast Region recorded a modest increase," said ShowingTime Chief Analytics Officer Daniil Cherkasskiy. "Activity in the South and Midwest remains slightly slower than in 2018, though there is more buyer activity in the lower price quartiles of the market. Pricier homes continue to see less traffic compared to the same time last year." The ShowingTime Showing Index, the first of its kind in the residential real estate industry, is compiled using data from property showings scheduled across the country on listings using ShowingTime products and services, providing a benchmark to track buyer demand. ShowingTime facilitates more than four million showings each month. Released monthly, the Showing Index tracks the average number of appointments received on active listings during the month. Local MLS indices are also available for select markets and are distributed to MLS and association leadership. To view the full report, visit showingtime.com/showingtime-showing-index/. About ShowingTime ShowingTime is the residential real estate industry's leading showing management and market stats technology provider, with more than 1.2 million active listings subscribed to its services. Its showing products and services simplify the appointment scheduling process for real estate professionals, buyers and sellers, resulting in more showings, more feedback and more efficient sales. Its MarketStats division provides interactive tools and easy-to-read market reports for MLSs, associations, brokers and other real estate companies. ShowingTime products are used in more than 250 MLSs representing over 950,000 real estate professionals across the U.S. and Canada. For more information, contact us at [email protected]
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Existing-Home Sales Falter 1.7% in June
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U.S. Median Home Prices Reach a New Peak in Q2 2019
Annual Home Price Appreciation (HPA) Increases in 89 Percent of Local Markets; U.S. Average Homeownership Tenure Sees an Annual Increase of 4 Percent; Profit Margins Rose to 33.9 Percent with Dollar Gains Reaching $67,500 IRVINE, Calif. – July 18, 2019 — ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database and first property data provider of Data-as-a-Service (DaaS), today released its Q2 2019 U.S. Home Sales Report, which shows that U.S. single family homes and condos sold for a median price of $266,000 in the second quarter, up 10.8 percent from the previous quarter and up 6.4 percent from a year ago — reaching a new median home price peak. Meanwhile, the report also shows that homeowners who sold in the second quarter had owned an average of 8.09 years, reaching a new peak, up 3 percent from last quarter and up 4 percent from Q2 2018. Homeownership tenure averaged 4.21 years nationwide between Q1 2000 and Q3 2007, prior to the Great Recession. "As warmer weather brings a rush of house hunters to the market, the latest spike in median home prices marked the largest quarterly increase since the second quarter of 2015 and the third biggest increase since the market started climbing out of the Great Recession in 2012," said Todd Teta, chief product officer at ATTOM Data Solutions. "However, in looking at historical trends, the second quarter of every year has always shown a quarterly increase, going as far back as 2005. So, with mortgage rates dipping to new lows, it's no surprise that people were wanting to buy a home, even if prices were at their peak. We expect to see milder home prices in the coming quarters." Annual home price appreciations rising in Milwaukee, Boston and Salt Lake City Median home prices in 133 of the 149 metro areas analyzed in the report (89 percent) saw an annual home price appreciation in the second quarter of 2019, led by Atlantic City, New Jersey (16.0 percent increase); Boise City, Idaho (14.0 percent increase); Chattanooga, Tennessee (13.9 percent increase); Mobile, Alabama (11.2 percent increase); and Madison, Wisconsin (10.8 percent increase). Those major metros with at least 1 million people that saw annual home price appreciations occurring in the second quarter of 2019 included: Milwaukee, Wisconsin (9.0 percent increase); Boston, Massachusetts (9.0 percent increase); Salt Lake City, Utah (8.7 percent increase); Columbus, Ohio (8.1 percent increase); and Birmingham, Alabama (6.3 percent increase). Prices in Denver, Austin, Dallas and Nashville 50+ percent above pre-recession peaks Median home prices in 110 of the 149 metro areas analyzed in the report (74 percent) were above pre-recession peaks in the second quarter of 2019, led by Greeley, Colorado (87 percent above); Shreveport, Louisiana (81 percent above); Denver, Colorado (80 percent above); Austin, Texas (77 percent above); and Fort Collins, Colorado (76 percent above). Including Denver and Austin, other major metros with at least 1 million people and with Q2 2019 median home prices at least 40 percent above pre-recession peaks were Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas (72 percent above); Nashville, Tennessee (71 percent above); San Antonio, Texas (58 percent above); Houston, Texas (54 percent above); and San Jose, California (54 percent above). Average home seller gains increase quarterly and annually U.S. homeowners who sold in the second quarter of 2019 realized an average home price gain since purchase of $67,500, up from an average gain of $57,706 in Q1 2019 and up from an average gain of $60,100 in Q2 2018. The average home seller gain of $67,500 in Q2 2019 represented an average 33.9 percent return as a percentage of original purchase price. Among 149 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report, those with the highest average home seller returns in Q2 2019 were San Jose, California (85.0 percent); San Francisco, California (71.6 percent); Seattle, Washington (65.6 percent); Salem, Oregon (62.3 percent); and Salt Lake City, Utah (60.7 percent). Average homeownership tenure drops annually in Tucson, Portland and Phoenix Counter to the national trend which saw the longest homeownership tenure to date, the average homeownership tenure in Q2 2019 decreased from a year ago in 28 of 108 metro areas analyzed in the report (26 percent), led by Merced, Colorado Springs, Vallejo, Springfield and Bremerton. Among major metropolitan areas that have a population of at least 1 million and where tenure decreased in the second quarter of 2019. The longest average times sellers lived in their homes were in Tucson, Arizona (8.88 years); Portland, Oregon (9.04 years); Phoenix, Arizona (8.17 years); San Francisco, California (10.26 years); and Tampa-St. Petersburg, Florida (7.85 years). Share of cash sales decrease annually All-cash sales represented 25.0 percent of all single family and condo sales in Q2 2019, down from 27.7 percent of all sales in the previous quarter, and down from 26.9 percent of all sales in Q2 2018. Among major metropolitan areas with a population of at least 1 million, those with the highest share of all-cash sales in Q2 2019 were; Miami, Florida (40.5 percent); Detroit, Michigan (36.7 percent); Birmingham, Alabama (34.9 percent); Tampa-St. Petersburg, Florida (34.2 percent); and Jacksonville, Florida (33.9 percent). Institutional investor sales highest in Atlanta, Charlotte, and Memphis The share of U.S. single family home and condo sales sold to institutional investors (entities buying at least 10 properties in a calendar year) was 2.2 percent in the second quarter of 2019, up from 1.9 percent in the previous quarter but down from 2.4 percent a year ago. Among the metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 1,000,000 and at least 50 institutional investor sales in Q2 2019, those with the highest share of institutional investor sales in the second quarter were; Atlanta, Georgia (7.9 percent); Charlotte, North Carolina (6.7 percent); Memphis, Tennessee (6.4 percent); Birmingham, Alabama (5.6 percent); and Raleigh, North Carolina (5.5 percent). Share of FHA buyers increase annually Sales to FHA buyers (typically first-time homebuyers or other buyers with a low-down payment) represented 11.6 percent of all U.S. single family and condo sales in Q2 2019, up from 11.1 percent of all sales in the previous quarter and up from 9.9 percent in Q2 2018. Among metro areas with a population of at least 1 million, those with the highest share of sales to FHA buyers were Riverside, California (18.6 percent); Indianapolis, Indiana (18.4 percent); San Antonio, Texas (18.2 percent); Providence, Rhode Island (17.8 percent); and Kansas City, Missouri (17.6 percent). Share of distressed sales continuing downward trend Total distressed sales — bank-owned (REO) sales, third-party foreclosure auction sales, and short sales — accounted for 11.4 percent of all single family and condo sales in Q2 2019, down from 14.0 percent in the previous quarter and up less than one percent from the same time last year. Among 149 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000 and at least 100 total distressed sales in Q2 2019, those with the highest share of total distressed sales were Atlantic City, New Jersey (27.6 percent); Trenton, New Jersey (25.3 percent); Norwich-New London, Connecticut (22.2 percent); Erie, Pennsylvania (22.1 percent); and Macon, Georgia (20.7 percent). Counter to the national trend of a slight annual uptick, 110 of the 150 metro areas (73 percent) posted year-over-year decreases in share of distressed sales. Those major metros with a population greater than 1 million that saw an annual decline were Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas (down 25.7 percent); Boston, Massachusetts (down 24 percent); Portland, Oregon (down 23.6 percent); Buffalo, New York (down 22.1 percent); and Tucson, Arizona (down 21.2 percent). Report methodology The ATTOM Data Solutions U.S. Home Sales Report provides percentages of distressed sales and all sales that are sold to investors, institutional investors and cash buyers, a state and metropolitan statistical area. Data is also available at the county and zip code level upon request. The data is derived from recorded sales deeds, foreclosure filings and loan data. Statistics for previous quarters are revised when each new report is issued as more deed data becomes available. About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk property data licensing, Property Data APIs, market trends, marketing lists, match & append and introducing the first property data deliver solution, a cloud-based data platform that streamlines data management – Data-as-a-Service (DaaS).
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HUD and Census Bureau Report Residential Construction Activity in June 2019
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CoreLogic Reports Lowest Overall Delinquency Rate in More than 20 Years This April
U.S. serious delinquency rate this April was the lowest for any month in nearly 14 years CoreLogic, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released its monthly Loan Performance Insights Report. The report shows that nationally 3.6% of mortgages were in some stage of delinquency (30 days or more past due, including those in foreclosure) in April 2019, representing a 0.7 percentage point decline in the overall delinquency rate compared with April 2018, when it was 4.3%. This was the lowest rate for any month in more than 20 years. As of April 2019, the foreclosure inventory rate – which measures the share of mortgages in some stage of the foreclosure process – was 0.4%, down 0.1 percentage points from April 2018. The April 2019 foreclosure inventory rate tied the prior five months as the lowest for any month since at least January 1999. Measuring early-stage delinquency rates is important for analyzing the health of the mortgage market. To monitor mortgage performance comprehensively, CoreLogic examines all stages of delinquency, as well as transition rates, which indicate the percentage of mortgages moving from one stage of delinquency to the next. The rate for early-stage delinquencies – defined as 30 to 59 days past due – was 1.7% in April 2019, down from 1.8% in April 2018. The share of mortgages 60 to 89 days past due in April 2019 was 0.6%, unchanged from April 2018. The serious delinquency rate – defined as 90 days or more past due, including loans in foreclosure – was 1.3% in April 2019, down from 1.9% in April 2018. April's serious delinquency rate of 1.3% was the lowest for any month since August 2005 when it was also 1.3%. Since early-stage delinquencies can be volatile, CoreLogic also analyzes transition rates. The share of mortgages that transitioned from current to 30 days past due was 0.7% in April 2019, down from 0.8% in April 2018. By comparison, in January 2007, just before the start of the financial crisis, the current-to-30-day transition rate was 1.2%, while it peaked in November 2008 at 2%. The nation's overall delinquency rate has fallen on a year-over-year basis for the past 16 consecutive months. In April, Nebraska's overall delinquency rate was unchanged from a year earlier and all other states posted at least a small annual decline. "Thanks to a 50-year low in unemployment, rising home prices and responsible underwriting, the U.S. overall delinquency rate is the lowest in more than 20 years," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist at CoreLogic. "However, a number of metros that suffered a natural disaster or economic decline contradict this national trend. For example, in the wake of the 2018 California Camp Fire, the serious delinquency rate in the Chico, California metro area this April was 21% higher than one year ago." In April 2019, 10 metropolitan areas logged an increase in the serious delinquency rate. The highest gains continue to plague the hurricane-ravaged parts of the Southeast (in Florida, Georgia and North Carolina), and in Northern California where the Camp Fire devastated communities in 2018. "The U.S. has experienced 16 consecutive months of falling overall delinquency rates, but it has not been a steady decline across all areas of the country," said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "Recent flooding in the Midwest could elevate delinquency rates in hard-hit areas, similar to what we see after a hurricane." The next CoreLogic Loan Performance Insights Report will be released on August 13, 2019, featuring data for May 2019. For ongoing housing trends and data, visit the CoreLogic Insights Blog: www.corelogic.com/insights. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX), the leading provider of property insights and solutions, promotes a healthy housing market and thriving communities. Through its enhanced property data solutions, services and technologies, CoreLogic enables real estate professionals, financial institutions, insurance carriers, government agencies and other housing market participants to help millions of people find, acquire and protect their homes. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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Constellation Real Estate Group Acquires offrs.com
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Supply of Homes for Sale Down 0.3% in June, First Annual Decline in 10 Months
Some expensive markets like San Jose, Seattle, and Boston are still seeing big gains in for-sale home inventory, while affordable markets like Oklahoma City, Buffalo, and Memphis are already experiencing big declines SEATTLE, July 2, 2019 -- The number of homes for sale nationally fell 0.3 percent year over year in late June--the first annual decline since inventory started climbing in September, according to Redfin, a technology-powered real estate brokerage. This marks the end of a brief respite for buyers in this years-old seller's market. If supply growth continues falling at the rate it has been since April, by September the number of homes for sale will be down from a year earlier by more than 4 percent. The report is based on data on the number of homes for sale as of June 23 across 46 major markets Redfin tracks. However, the national numbers mask a huge amount of regional variation under the surface. As of late June, 32 of the 46 largest U.S. metro areas had fewer homes for sale compared to a year earlier. In fact, in some of the country's most affordable housing markets, the inventory crunch never subsided. For example, Oklahoma City, where the median price of homes sold in May was just $184,900, had 15.3 percent fewer homes for sale in late June compared to a year earlier and has not seen year-over-year growth since going negative in late 2016. Other affordable metro areas like Memphis and Pittsburgh have similar stories. Most of the big gains in the national count of homes for sale over the past year have been driven by expensive metro areas with median prices well above the national median. San Jose (up 43.6%, median price $1,175,000), Seattle (up 21.9%, median price $592,500), and Boston (up 21.3%, median price $517,000) were the three metro areas that gained the most homes for sale compared to a year earlier. However, even in those markets, the rate of growth has fallen off dramatically from where it was in late 2018, contributing to the decline in the national rate of inventory growth. With mortgage interest rates having dropped back to below 4 percent, demand is picking back up, which is likely to lead to renewed inventory shortages later this year, even in the more expensive markets. "Lower interest rates are bringing buyers back, but without enough homes for sale to meet demand, we expect to see more bidding wars, which will push prices up this summer," said Redfin chief economist Daryl Fairweather. "We expect small, inland markets where a typical home is still affordable for a middle-class family to heat up the most. Those markets, like Knoxville and Akron, are already experiencing double-digit annual price growth, and there is a lot of room for prices to continue to grow. Expensive metros like San Jose and Seattle may see moderate price growth this summer, but for the most part those markets have already peaked." In San Francisco, where a recent series of high-value tech IPOs has already led to a surge in bidding wars, the number of homes for sale was still up 12.0 percent from a year ago—far less than San Jose or Seattle. Supply growth is down from a high of over 60 percent in late December, indicating that San Francisco is transitioning from a sharp cooldown back to a hot market. To read the full report, complete with charts and a table with market-by-market data, please visit: https://www.redfin.com/blog/the-inventory-crunch-is-back/. About Redfin Redfin is a technology-powered real estate brokerage, combining its own full-service agents with modern technology to redefine real estate in the consumer's favor. Founded by software engineers, Redfin has the country's #1 brokerage website and offers a host of online tools to consumers, including the Redfin Estimate, the automated home-value estimate with the industry's lowest published error rate for listed homes. Homebuyers and sellers enjoy a full-service, technology-powered experience from Redfin real estate agents, while saving thousands in commissions. Redfin serves more than 85 major metro areas across the U.S. and Canada. The company has closed more than $85 billion in home sales.
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CoreLogic Reports May Home Prices Increased by 3.6% Year Over Year
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Pending Home Sales Bounce Back 1.1% in May
WASHINGTON (June 27, 2019) – Pending home sales increased in May, a positive variation from the minor sales dip seen in the previous month, according to the National Association of Realtors. Three of the four major regions saw growth in contract activity, with the West experiencing a slight sales decline. The Pending Home Sales Index, a forward-looking indicator based on contract signings, climbed 1.1% to 105.4 in May, up from 104.3 in April. Year-over-year contract signings declined 0.7%, marking the 17th straight month of annual decreases. Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist, said lower-than-usual mortgage rates have led to the increase in pending sales for May. "Rates of 4% and, in some cases even lower, create extremely attractive conditions for consumers. Buyers, for good reason, are anxious to purchase and lock in at these rates." Yun said consumer confidence about home buying has risen, and he expects more activity in the coming months. "The Federal Reserve may cut interest rates one more time this year, but there is no guarantee mortgage rates will fall from these already historically low points," he said. "Job creation and a rise in inventory will nonetheless drive more buyers to enter the market." Citing the hottest housing markets from data at realtor.com®, Yun says the year-over-year increases could be a sign of a rise in inventory. Rochester, N.Y., Fort Wayne, Ind., Lafayette-West Lafayette, Ind., Boston-Cambridge-Newton, Mass., and Midland, Texas, were the hottest housing markets in May. Yun said that while contract signings and mortgage applications have increased, there is still a great need for more inventory. "Home builders have not ramped up construction to the extent that is needed," he said. "Homes are selling swiftly, and more construction will help keep home prices manageable and thereby allow more middle-class families to attain ownership opportunities." May Pending Home Sales Regional Breakdown The PHSI in the Northeast rose 3.5% to 92.0 in May and is now 0.5% below a year ago. In the Midwest, the index grew 3.6% to 100.3 in May, 1.2% lower than May 2018. Pending home sales in the South inched up 0.1% to an index of 124.1 in May, which is 0.7% higher than last May. The index in the West dropped 1.8% in May to 91.8 and decreased 3.1% below a year ago. The National Association of Realtors® is America's largest trade association, representing more than 1.3 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.
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CoreLogic Reports the Negative Equity Share Fell to 4.1% in the First Quarter of 2019
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Redfin Report: May Home Prices Up 3.6% in May, the Largest Year-over-Year Increase in 7 Months
Recent upticks in mortgage applications and home tours suggest that home price growth will strengthen this summer SEATTLE, June 20, 2019 -- U.S. home-sale prices edged up again in May, growing 3.6 percent from a year ago to a median of $315,700, according to a new report from Redfin, the technology-powered real estate brokerage. This was the biggest annual home price increase in seven months. Only six of the 85 largest metro areas Redfin tracks saw a year-over-year decline in their median sale price, the biggest of which were a 6 percent drop in San Jose, a 2.5 percent dip in New York, and a 2.2 percent decline in Honolulu. All three of the other metros that saw price drops were in California: Orange County (-1.4%), Los Angeles (-0.8%) and Oakland (-0.7%). "As mortgage rates have fallen this month, Redfin has seen upticks in the number of people wanting to talk with our agents about buying homes and the number going on home tours," said Redfin chief economist Daryl Fairweather. "Recent surges in mortgage applications also reflect the impact low rates are having on homebuyer demand nationwide. We haven't yet seen a commensurate increase in U.S. home sales, and I don't expect sales to increase substantially in the long run. That's because there still aren't enough homes for sale for all of the people who want to buy homes. In May, inventory posted its smallest increase in eight months, and fewer new listings came on the market than last year. Low rates and rising prices will likely lure sellers onto the market this summer, but the lack of new construction will continue to hold back sales growth." Home sales were essentially flat in May, up 0.2 percent year over year. Forty-eight of the 85 metros tracked by Redfin saw an increase in sales from a year earlier. The number of homes for sale as of the end of May was up 2.5 percent from the same time last year. This was the smallest year-over-year increase in home supply in eight months. The number of homes newly listed for sale last month fell 0.7 percent from a year earlier. Nationwide, measures of competition are mixed, with some pointing toward a hotter market than a year ago and others indicating that the market has cooled. One indicator of a hotter market is the median number of days on market, which dropped to 36 days in May from 37 days a year earlier. This is the lowest days on market measured in any month of May since at least 2010 (as far back as Redfin has recorded this measure nationally). An indicator pointing to a cooler market is the share of homes for sale that had a price drop, which rose to 25.9 percent, the highest rate since September's record high, and up from 23.4 percent last year. The share of homes sold above list price is also falling, down to 24.4 percent in May from 28 percent last year. Still, last month's rate of homes selling above list price was the highest since last August. To read the full report, including charts and metro-level data breakdowns, please visit: https://www.redfin.com/blog/may-2019-housing-market-tracker. About Redfin Redfin is a technology-powered real estate brokerage, combining its own full-service agents with modern technology to redefine real estate in the consumer's favor. Founded by software engineers, Redfin has the country's #1 brokerage website and offers a host of online tools to consumers, including the Redfin Estimate, the automated home-value estimate with the industry's lowest published error rate for listed homes. Homebuyers and sellers enjoy a full-service, technology-powered experience from Redfin real estate agents, while saving thousands in commissions. Redfin serves more than 85 major metro areas across the U.S. and Canada. The company has closed more than $85 billion in home sales.
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May Residential Real Estate Traffic Down in 75% of Regions, but More Comparable to Prior Year
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U.S. Completed Foreclosures Decrease 50 Percent from a Year Ago
Foreclosure Starts Continue Upward Trend in Florida; New Jersey, Maryland and Florida Rank Highest in Foreclosure Rate; Overall Foreclosure Activity Decreases 22 Percent from a Year Ago IRVINE, Calif. – June 13, 2019 – ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database and first property data provider of Data-as-a-Service (DaaS), today released its May 2019 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report, which shows foreclosure filings — default notices, scheduled auctions and bank repossessions — were reported on 56,152 U.S. properties in May 2019, up 1 percent from the previous month but down 22 percent from a year ago for the 11th consecutive month with an annual decline. "We are continuing to see a downward trend with overall foreclosure activity, especially in completed foreclosures declining year after year," said Todd Teta, chief product officer at ATTOM Data Solutions. "However, in May 2019 we did see an uptick in the number of states increasing in foreclosure starts going from 17 to 23 states rising annually, and again Florida is bucking the national trend with a continuous annual increase." May 2019 Foreclosure Starts by County Foreclosure completions decline annually in every state except Vermont Lenders completed foreclosures (REO) on 10,634 U.S. properties in May 2019, down 4 percent from the previous month and down 50 percent from a year ago – a 7th consecutive annual decline. States across the nation, except for Vermont all saw annual declines in completed foreclosures. Those that saw an annual decline of more than 50 percent in REOs included Michigan (down 84 percent); Massachusetts (down 74 percent); Indiana (down 67 percent); Kentucky (down 66 percent); and New Jersey (down 64 percent). In looking at those greater metropolitan areas with a population of 200,000 or more and those that had at least 100 completed foreclosures in May 2019, with double-digit decreases were Birmingham, Alabama (down 67 percent); New York, New York (down 59 percent); Washington, DC (down 58 percent); Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (down 57 percent); and Detroit, Michigan (down 54 percent). Florida foreclosure starts continuing double-digit annual increase Lenders started the foreclosure process on 30,554 U.S. properties in May 2019, while slightly up (less than 1 percent) from last month they are down 9 percent from May 2018 –fourth consecutive month with an annual decline. Counter to the national trend states that saw an increase in foreclosure starts in May 2019 were Wisconsin (up 99 percent); Kentucky (up 64 percent); Louisiana (up 53 percent); Missouri (up 34 percent); and Florida (up 23 percent). This is the 12th consecutive month that Florida has seen double-digit annual increases in foreclosure starts. "To put the numbers in perspective, I would use a full year, perhaps 2006 as a "normal" benchmark number. That would be the last year before the real estate world crashed," said Bruce Norris, president of The Norris Group. "The total foreclosure starts for Florida in 2006 was 102,875. In 2018, there were 33,031 foreclosure starts. Even at a 25% increase over 2018, 2019 will still be less than 50% of 2006. An increase of some 8,000 foreclosure starts is not a game changer at this point." States that posted annual decreases in foreclosure starts in May 2019, included Texas (down 39 percent); Pennsylvania (down 38 percent); Massachusetts (down 34 percent); Oklahoma (down 29 percent); and New York (down 25 percent). Those major metropolitan statistical areas with a population greater than 1,000,000 that saw an annual decrease in foreclosure starts included Indianapolis, Indiana (down 82 percent); Houston, Texas (down 65 percent); San Jose, California (down 58 percent); Austin, Texas (down 41 percent); and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (down 34 percent). New Jersey, Maryland and Florida rank top 3 in worst foreclosure rate Nationwide one in every 2,411 housing units had a foreclosure filing in May 2019. States with the highest foreclosure rates were New Jersey (one in every 1,117 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Maryland (one in every 1,127 housing units); Florida (one in every 1,238 housing units); Delaware (one in every 1,279 housing units); and Illinois (one in every 1,363 housing units). Among 220 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000, those with the highest foreclosure rates in May 2019 were Atlantic City, New Jersey (one in every 680 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Jacksonville, Florida (one in every 764 housing units); Fayetteville, North Carolina (one in every 777 housing units); Columbia, South Carolina (one in every 936 housing units); and Rockford, Illinois (one in every 941 housing units). About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, APIs, market trends, marketing lists, match & append and introducing the first property data deliver solution, a cloud-based data platform that streamlines data management – Data-as-a-Service (DaaS).
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CoreLogic Reports Lowest U.S. Foreclosure Rate for a March in at Least 20 Years; Overall and Serious Delinquency Rates for a March at 13 Year Lows
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U.S. Home Flipping Rate Reaches a Nine-Year High in Q1 2019
Total dollar volume of homes flipped with financing reaches 6.4 billion – a 12-year high Average flipping ROI continues to decline to an almost eight-year low, while gross flipping profits drop 12 percent from last year IRVINE, Calif. – June 6, 2019 — ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database and first property data provider of Data-as-a-Service (DaaS), today released its Q1 2019 U.S. Home Flipping Report, which shows that 49,059 U.S. single family homes and condos were flipped in the first quarter of 2019, down 2 percent from the previous quarter and down 8 percent from a year ago to a three-year low. The 49,059 homes flipped in the first quarter represented 7.2 percent of all home sales during the quarter, up from 5.9 percent in the previous quarter and up from 6.7 percent a year ago — the highest home flipping rate since Q1 2010. Homes flipped in Q1 2019 sold at an average gross profit of $60,000, down from an average gross flipping profit of $62,000 in the previous quarter and down from $68,000 in Q1 2018 to the lowest average gross flipping profit since Q1 2016. The average gross flipping profit of $60,000 in Q1 2019 translated into an average 38.7 percent return on investment compared to the original acquisition price, down from a 42.5 percent average gross flipping ROI in Q4 2018 and down from an average gross flipping ROI of 48.6 percent in Q1 2018 to the lowest level since Q3 2011 — a nearly eight-year low. "With interest rates dropping and home price increases starting to ease, investors may be getting out while the getting is good, before the market softens further," said Todd Teta, chief product officer at ATTOM Data Solutions. "While the home flipping rate is increasing, gross profits and ROI are starting to weaken and the number of investors that are flipping is down 11 percent from last year. Therefore, if investors are seeing profit margins drop, they may be acting now and selling before price increases drop even more." Home flipping rate up from year ago in 62 percent of local markets Eighty-five of 138 metropolitan statistical analyzed in the report (62 percent) posted a year-over-year increase in their home flipping rate in Q1 2019, including Columbus, Georgia (up 83 percent); Raleigh, North Carolina (up 73 percent); Charlotte, North Carolina (up 65 percent); McAllen-Edinburg, Texas (up 55 percent); and Milwaukee, Wisconsin (up 49 percent). Along with Raleigh, Charlotte, and Milwaukee, other metro areas with a population of at least 1 million and a home flipping rate increasing in the double digits were San Antonio, Texas (up 47 percent); Houston, Texas (up 41 percent); Atlanta, Georgia (up 38 percent); Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (up 36 percent); and Minneapolis, Minnesota (up 33 percent). The number of homes flipped reached new peaks in Q1 2019 for Raleigh, North Carolina and San Antonio, Texas in the first quarter of 2019. Home flip lending volume up 35 percent to 12-year high The total dollar volume of financed home flip purchases was $6.4 billion for homes flipped in the first quarter of 2019, up 35 percent from $4.7 billion in Q1 2018 to the highest level since Q2 2007 — over a 12-year high. Flipped homes originally purchased by the investor with financing represented 37.5 percent of homes flipped in Q1 2019, down from 39.5 percent in the previous quarter and down from 41.2 percent a year ago. Among 53 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report with at least 1 million people, those with the highest percentage of Q1 2019 completed flips purchased with financing were San Diego, California (56.0 percent); Seattle, Washington (52.5 percent); San Francisco, California (51.7 percent); Denver, Colorado (51.6 percent); and Boston, Massachusetts (51.3 percent). 11 Markets where investors are doubling their ROI Among the 138 metropolitan statistical areas analyzed in the report with at least 50 home flips completed in Q1 2019, those with the highest average gross flipping ROI were Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (131.2 percent); Flint, Michigan (127.6 percent); Shreveport, Louisiana (112.5 percent); Scranton, Pennsylvania (112.0 percent); and Knoxville, Tennessee (105.0 percent). Along with Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania metro areas with a population of at least 1 million and an average gross flipping ROI of at least 79 percent were Cleveland, Ohio (100.0 percent); Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (100.0 percent); Buffalo, New York (89.7 percent); and Memphis, Tennessee (79.2 percent). Average home flipping returns continue to slip Homes flipped in the first quarter of 2019 were sold for a median price of $215,000, a gross flipping profit of $60,000 above the median purchase price of $155,000, down from a gross flipping profit of $62,000 in the previous quarter and a gross flipping profit of $68,000 in Q1 2018 — to the lowest levels since Q1 2016. Of those 138 markets with at least 50 or more flips and a population greater than 200,000 in the first quarter of 2019, those that saw the lowest gross flipping profit were McAllen-Edinburg, Texas (profit of $8,752); Daphne, Alabama (profit of $15,761); Boise City, Idaho (profit of $18,332); Lexington, Kentucky (profit of $20,000); and San Antonio, Texas (profit of $23,596). Average time to flip nationwide at 180 days Homes flipped in Q1 2019 took an average of 180 days to complete the flip, up from an average 175 days for homes flipped in Q4 2018 but down from 182 days a year ago. Among the 138 metro areas analyzed in the report, those with the shortest average days to flip were McAllen-Edinburg, Texas (127 days); Memphis, Tennessee (136 days); Raleigh, North Carolina (142 days); Mobile, Alabama (144 days); and Phoenix, Arizona (151 days). Metro areas with the longest average days to flip were Naples, Florida (235 days); Bridgeport, Connecticut (230 days); New Haven, Connecticut (225 days); Provo, Utah (219 days); and Hartford, Connecticut (219 days). Flipped homes sold to FHA buyers increases from previous quarter Of the 49,059 U.S. homes flipped in Q1 2019, 14.2 percent were sold by the flipper to a buyer using a loan backed by the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), up from 13.2 percent in the previous quarter but down from 15.2 percent a year ago. Among the 138 metro areas analyzed in the report, those with the highest percentage of Q1 2019 home flips sold to FHA buyers — typically first-time homebuyers — were Worcester, Massachusetts (30.0 percent); Shreveport, Louisiana (29.0 percent); Modesto, California (27.3 percent); Hartford, Connecticut (27.2 percent); and Springfield, Massachusetts (27.0 percent). Eight zip codes with a home flipping rate of more than 30 percent Among 1,433 U.S. zip codes with at least 10 home flips in Q1 2019, there were eight zip codes where home flips accounted for more than 30 percent of all home sales, here are the top five: 93212 in Kings county, California (48.0 percent); 11433 in Queens county, New York (35.7 percent); 33147 Miami-Dade county, Florida (32.7 percent); 38115 in Shelby county, Tennessee (32.4 percent); and 92802 in Orange county, California (32.1 percent). About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, APIs, market trends, marketing lists, match & append and introducing the first property data deliver solution, a cloud-based data platform that streamlines data management – Data-as-a-Service (DaaS).
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Homes Becoming More Affordable Despite Rising Prices
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CoreLogic Reports April Home Prices Increased by 3.6% Year Over Year
CoreLogic, a leading global property information, analytics and data-enabled solutions provider, today released the CoreLogic Home Price Index (HPI) and HPI Forecast for April 2019, which shows home prices rose both year over year and month over month. Home prices increased nationally by 3.6% from April 2018. On a month-over-month basis, prices increased by 1% in April 2019. (March 2019 data was revised. Revisions with public records data are standard, and to ensure accuracy, CoreLogic incorporates the newly released public data to provide updated results each month.) Looking ahead, after several months of moderation in early 2019, the CoreLogic HPI Forecast indicates home prices will begin to pick up and increase by 4.7% from April 2019 to April 2020. On a month-over-month basis, home prices are expected to decrease by 0.3% from April 2019 to May 2019. The CoreLogic HPI Forecast is a projection of home prices calculated using the CoreLogic HPI and other economic variables. Values are derived from state-level forecasts by weighting indices according to the number of owner-occupied households for each state. "The pickup in sales between March and April, has helped to counter the recent slowing in annual home-price growth," said Dr. Frank Nothaft, chief economist at CoreLogic. "Mortgage rates are 0.6 percentage points below what they were one year ago and incomes are up, which has improved affordability for buyers. However, price growth has remained the highest for lower-priced homes, constraining housing choices for first-time buyers." According to the CoreLogic Market Condition Indicators (MCI), an analysis of housing values in the country's 100 largest metropolitan areas based on housing stock, 37% of metropolitan areas have an overvalued housing market as of April 2019. The MCI analysis categorizes home prices in individual markets as undervalued, at value or overvalued, by comparing home prices to their long-run, sustainable levels, which are supported by local market fundamentals such as disposable income. As of April 2019, 26% of the top 100 metropolitan areas were undervalued, and 37% were at value. When looking at only the top 50 markets based on housing stock, 42% were overvalued, 16% were undervalued and 42% were at value. The MCI analysis defines an overvalued housing market as one in which home prices are at least 10% above the long-term, sustainable level. An undervalued housing market is one in which home prices are at least 10% below the sustainable level. During the first quarter of 2019, CoreLogic together with RTi Research of Norwalk, Connecticut, conducted an extensive survey measuring consumer-housing sentiment in high-priced markets. Eight in 10 residents in high-priced markets said home prices have continued to climb over the past three years and are still rising, although more moderately. The impact of continued price increases means new homeowners had to make compromises when purchasing. As many as 40% of respondents indicated they could not buy a home in their preferred area, and a third felt they had to purchase a smaller home than they desired. "According to our consumer research, buyers feel that high prices are forcing them to spend more than they'd expect on a home," said Frank Martell, president and CEO of CoreLogic. "As many as one-third of buyers admit they put down a higher down payment as well." About the CoreLogic Consumer Housing Sentiment Study In the first quarter of 2019, 1,002 renters and homeowners were surveyed by CoreLogic together with RTi Research. This study is a quarterly pulse of U.S. housing market dynamics. Each quarter, the research focuses on a different issue related to current housing topics. This first quarterly study concentrated on consumer sentiment within high-priced markets. The survey has a sampling error of +/- 3.1% at the total respondent level with a 95% confidence level. About RTi Research RTi Research is an innovative, global market research and brand strategy consultancy headquartered in Norwalk, CT. Founded in 1979, RTi has been consistently recognized by the American Marketing Association as one of the top 50 U.S. insights companies. The company serves a broad base of leading firms in Financial Services, Consumer Goods, and Pharmaceuticals as well as partnering with leading academic centers of excellence. About CoreLogic CoreLogic (NYSE: CLGX), the leading provider of property insights and solutions, promotes a healthy housing market and thriving communities. Through its enhanced property data solutions, services and technologies, CoreLogic enables real estate professionals, financial institutions, insurance carriers, government agencies and other housing market participants to help millions of people find, acquire and protect their homes. For more information, please visit www.corelogic.com.
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Inventory Pile Up Creates Top Markets for Home Buyers
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Pending Home Sales Trail Off 1.5% in April
WASHINGTON (May 30, 2019) – Pending home sales declined in April, a modest change from the growth seen a month before, according to the National Association of Realtors®. Only one of the four major regions – the Midwest – experienced growth, while the remaining three regions reported a drop in their respective contract activity. The Pending Home Sales Index, a forward-looking indicator based on contract signings, fell 1.5% to 104.3 in April, down from 105.9 in March. Year-over-year contract signings declined 2.0%, making this the 16th straight month of annual decreases. Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist, said the sales dip has yet to account for some of the more favorable trends toward homeownership, such as lower mortgage rates. "Though the latest monthly figure shows a mild decline in contract signings, mortgage applications and consumer confidence have been steadily rising," he said. "It's inevitable for sales to turn higher in a few months." "Home price appreciation has been the strongest on the lower-end as inventory conditions have been consistently tight on homes priced under $250,000. Price conditions are soft on the upper-end, especially in high tax states like Connecticut, New York and Illinois." The supply of inventory for homes priced under $250,000 stood at 3.3 months in April, and homes priced $1 million and above recorded an inventory of 8.9 months in April. Citing active listings from data at realtor.com®, Yun says the year-over-year increases could be a sign of a rise in inventory. San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, Calif., Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, Wash., San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, Calif., Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, Ore.-Wash., and Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin, Tenn., saw the largest increase in active listings in April compared to a year ago. "We are seeing migration to more affordable regions, particularly in the South, where there has been recent job growth and homes are more affordable," Yun said. April Pending Home Sales Regional Breakdown The PHSI in the Northeast declined 1.8% to 88.9 in April and is now 2.1% below a year ago. In the Midwest, the index grew 1.3% to 96.8 in April, 2.4% lower than April 2018. Pending home sales in the South fell 2.5% to an index of 124.0 in April, which is 1.8% lower than last April. The index in the West dropped 1.8% in April to 93.5 and fell only 1.5% below a year ago. The National Association of Realtors® is America's largest trade association, representing more than 1.3 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.
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April showings sluggish as market sees ninth straight month of diminished YOY activity
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U.S. Foreclosure Activity Decreases 13 Percent in April 2019
Foreclosure Starts Spike in Washington, Florida, Oregon and Louisiana; New Jersey, Maryland and Delaware Rank Highest in Foreclosure Rate; Completed Foreclosures Decrease 22 Percent IRVINE, Calif. – May 16, 2019 – ATTOM Data Solutions, curator of the nation's premier property database and first property data provider of Data-as-a-Service (DaaS), today released its April 2019 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report, which shows foreclosure filings — default notices, scheduled auctions and bank repossessions — were reported on 55,646 U.S. properties in April 2019, down 5 percent from the previous month and down 13 percent from a year ago for the 10th consecutive month with an annual decline. "While overall foreclosure activity is down nationwide, there are still parts of the country that we need to keep a close eye on," said Todd Teta, chief product officer at ATTOM Data Solutions. "For instance, Florida is seeing a steady annual increase in total foreclosure activity for the 8th consecutive month, which is being sustained by a constant annual double-digit increase in foreclosure starts." April 2019 County Foreclosure Heat Map Foreclosure starts increase annually in 17 states Lenders started the foreclosure process on 30,524 U.S. properties in April 2019, down 5 percent from last month and down 10 percent from April 2018 –third consecutive month with an annual decline. States that posted annual decreases in foreclosure starts in April 2019, included New York (down 43 percent); Nevada (down 36 percent); Colorado (down 34 percent); Maryland (down 31 percent); and Michigan (down 25 percent). Those major metropolitan statistical areas with a population greater than 500,000 that saw a large annual increase in foreclosure starts from last year included Orlando, Florida (up 90 percent); Miami, Florida (up 45 percent); Columbus, Ohio (up 35 percent); Portland, Oregon (up 31 percent); and El Paso, Texas (up 22 percent). Counter to the national trend 17 states had an annual increase in foreclosure starts. Those states included Washington (up 38 percent); Florida (up 34 percent); Oregon (up 22 percent); Louisiana (up 12 percent); and Georgia (up 11 percent). Highest foreclosure rates in New Jersey, Maryland and Delaware Nationwide one in every 2,433 housing units had a foreclosure filing in April 2019. States with the highest foreclosure rates were New Jersey (one in every 980 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Maryland (one in every 1,218 housing units); Delaware (one in every 1,249 housing units); Illinois (one in every 1,371 housing units); and Florida (one in every 1,415 housing units). Among 220 metropolitan statistical areas with a population of at least 200,000, those with the highest foreclosure rates in April 2019 were Atlantic City, New Jersey (one in every 702 housing units with a foreclosure filing); Fayetteville, North Carolina (one in every 732 housing units); Clarksville, Tennessee (one in every 853 housing units); Columbia, South Carolina (one in every 946 housing units); and Deltona-Daytona Beach, Florida (one in every 966 housing units). Foreclosure completions continue to decline Lenders completed foreclosures (REO) on 11,078 U.S. properties in April 2019, down 9 percent from the previous month and down 22 percent from a year ago – a 6th consecutive annual decline. States that saw a double-digit annual decline in REOs included Alabama (down 45 percent); Arizona (down 38 percent); North Carolina (down 32 percent); California (down 20 percent); and Nevada (down 14 percent). Counter to the national trend, 10 states posted year-over-year increases in REOs in April 2019, including Washington (up 53 percent); Connecticut (up 22 percent); Kentucky (up 19 percent); and New York (up 3 percent). About ATTOM Data Solutions ATTOM Data Solutions provides premium property data to power products that improve transparency, innovation, efficiency and disruption in a data-driven economy. ATTOM multi-sources property tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, environmental risk, natural hazard, and neighborhood data for more than 155 million U.S. residential and commercial properties covering 99 percent of the nation's population. A rigorous data management process involving more than 20 steps validates, standardizes and enhances the data collected by ATTOM, assigning each property record with a persistent, unique ID — the ATTOM ID. The 9TB ATTOM Data Warehouse fuels innovation in many industries including mortgage, real estate, insurance, marketing, government and more through flexible data delivery solutions that include bulk file licenses, APIs, market trends, marketing lists, match & append and introducing the first property data deliver solution, a cloud-based data platform that streamlines data management – Data-as-a-Service (DaaS).
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Existing-Home Sales Inch Back 0.4% in April
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Redfin: Vacant Homes Fetch Less Money and Take Longer to Sell
SEATTLE, May 20, 2019 -- Nationwide, vacant homes sell for $11,306 less and spend six more days on the market than comparable occupied homes, according to an analysis from Redfin, the technology-powered real estate brokerage. The analysis looked at homes that were listed and sold in 2018, comparing the sale prices and time spent on the market for home listings that were marked 'vacant' at the time they were sold with those that were not flagged as vacant. "Although vacant homes are easy for buyers to tour at their convenience, the fact that the sellers have already moved on is often a signal that buyers can take their time making an offer," said Redfin chief economist Daryl Fairweather. "It's also likely that sellers who are in a comfortable enough financial situation to own a property that's sitting empty aren't as motivated to get the highest possible price for their home as sellers who need the cash from their first home in order to buy the next one." Though vacant homes sell for less money in every metro area included in the analysis, the amount varies by location. Vacant homes come with the biggest discount compared with occupied homes in relatively affordable inland areas. Vacant homes still sell for less than occupied homes in expensive West Coast metros, but the price differential is smaller. In both Omaha, Nebraska and Greenville, South Carolina, where vacant homes are associated with the biggest discount, vacant homes sell for 7.2 percent, or about $15,000, less on average than occupied homes. In San Jose, buyers get the smallest discount on vacant homes, which sell for just 0.9 percent less than homes that aren't vacant, followed by Las Vegas (-1.5%) and Orange County (-2.3%). Vacant homes take longer to go under contract in every metro except San Jose, where they spend an average of one and a half fewer days on the market than occupied homes. "Whether occupied homes sell faster and for more money depends on a lot of factors, as everyone's tastes and preferences are different," said Billie Jean Hemerson, a Redfin agent in Orange County. "If a home is occupied and the furniture is modern, up to date and fits the space, it has a positive impact on a potential buyer's perception of the home and they may pay more than if the home were vacant. But if a seller's furnishings are dated, dark or too large for the space, buyers may offer less." Staging Vacant Homes Redfin agents suggest that although vacant homes tend to sell for less money and spend more time on the market before going under contract, staging or virtual staging can help vacant homes make a better impression with buyers. Staging involves hiring a company to bring and arrange furniture in your home to showcase its potential to buyers. Staging can be particularly impactful for homes with open spaces or unusual layouts, where buyers most often need help to see how the furniture could be arranged. Professional staging can cost several thousand dollars, depending on the number of rooms staged and the length of time. "Staging a property can have a profound effect on both the sale price and days on the market, but the main challenge of physical staging is that it's cumbersome, costly and offers no flexibility to showcase various aesthetic stylings," said Pieter Aarts, CEO and co-founder of roOomy, a leading virtual staging, CGI and 3D modeling platform. Aarts added: "Virtual staging is a cost-efficient option that gives homebuyers an ultra-realistic view of what the vacant home will look like at its full potential. It caters to today's homebuyers who are increasingly demanding immersive services and mobile augmented and virtual reality tools that allow them to evaluate a property, often times without needing to physically set foot in the home." To read the full report, complete with market-level analysis, methodology and virtual staging photos, please click here. About Redfin Redfin is a technology-powered real estate brokerage, combining its own full-service agents with modern technology to redefine real estate in the consumer's favor. Founded by software engineers, Redfin has the country's #1 brokerage website and offers a host of online tools to consumers, including the Redfin Estimate, the automated home-value estimate with the industry's lowest published error rate for listed homes. Homebuyers and sellers enjoy a full-service, technology-powered experience from Redfin real estate agents, while saving thousands in commissions. Redfin serves more than 85 major metro areas across the U.S. and Canada. The company has closed more than $85 billion in home sales.
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CoreLogic Reports U.S. Overall Delinquency Rate Lowest for a February in Nearly Two Decades
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Metro Home Prices See 3.9% Increase in 2019's First Quarter
WASHINGTON (May 14, 2019) – Inventory increased and metro market prices rose in the first quarter of 2019, but at a slower pace than the previous quarter, according to the latest quarterly report by the National Association of Realtors®. The national median existing single-family home price in the first quarter was $254,800, up 3.9% from the first quarter of 2018 ($245,300). Single-family home prices increased in 86% of measured markets last quarter, with 153 of 178 metropolitan statistical areas showing sales price gains compared to the first quarter of a year ago. Thirteen metro areas (7%) experienced double-digit increases, down from 14 in 2018"s fourth quarter. Lawrence Yun, NAR chief economist, says the first quarter has been beneficial to U.S. homeowners. "Homeowners in the majority of markets are continuing to enjoy price gains, albeit at a slower rate of growth. A typical homeowner accumulated $9,500 in wealth over the past year, he said. Total existing-home sales, including single family homes and condos, increased 1.2% to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.207 million in the first quarter, up from 5.143 million in the fourth quarter of 2018. That is 5.4% lower than the 5.507 million-pace in the first quarter of 2018. At the end of 2019"s first quarter, 1.68 million existing homes were available for sale, 2.4% up from the 1.64 figure at the end of 2018"s first quarter. Average supply during the first quarter of 2019 was 3.8 months – up from 3.5 months in the first quarter of 2018. National family median income rose to $77,7524 in the first quarter, while higher home prices caused overall affordability to decrease from last year. A buyer making a 5% down payment would need an income of $60,143 to purchase a single-family home at the national median price, while a 10% down payment would require an income of $56,978, and $50,647 would be necessary for a 20% down payment. The five most expensive housing markets in the first quarter were the San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, Calif., metro area, where the median existing single-family price was $1,220,000; San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, Calif., $930,000; Anaheim-Santa Ana-Irvine, Calif., $800,000; Urban Honolulu, Hawaii $794,100; and San Diego-Carlsbad, Calif., $620,000. "There are vast home price differences among metro markets, Yun says. "The condition of extremely high home prices may not be sustainable in light of many alternative metro markets that are much more affordable. Therefore, a shift in job search and residential relocations into more affordable regions of the country is likely in the future." The five lowest-cost metro areas in the fourth quarter were Decatur, Ill., $80,800; Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio, $89,200; Elmira, N.Y., $90,400; Cumberland, Md., $99,300; and Binghamton, N.Y., $107,200. Yun continues to call on the construction industry to develop more affordable housing units, which he says will combat slower price gains and buyer pullback. "More supply is needed to provide better homeownership opportunities, taming home price growth and widening the inventory choices for consumers. Housing Opportunity Zones could provide the necessary financial benefits for homebuilders to construct moderately priced-homes," Yun said. Regional Breakdown Total existing-home sales in the Northeast sat at an annual rate of 683,000 (down 1.4% from last quarter) and are down only 1.0% from a year ago. The median existing single-family home price in the Northeast was $277,200 in the first quarter, up 3.7% from a year ago. In the Midwest, existing-home sales fell 4.0% in the first quarter and are 5.5% below a year ago. The median existing single-family home price in the Midwest sat at $194,100, a 3.9% increase from the first quarter of 2018. Existing-home sales in the South increased 4.3% in the first quarter but were 4.0% lower than the first quarter of 2018. The median existing single-family home price in the South was $225,700 in the fourth quarter, 2.5% above a year ago. In the West, existing-home sales in the first quarter grew by 2.8% and are 10.7% below a year ago. The median existing single-family home price in the West increased 3.5% year-over-year to $384,300. The National Association of Realtors® is America"s largest trade association, representing more than 1.3 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries.
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