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It's Time to Modernize the Clickwrap Experience
We've all done it at some point. We've checked the box on a signup form that says we agree to a company's privacy policy, or we've scrolled to the end of a terms-and-conditions page and clicked the "I accept" button. Companies have been using--and people have been accepting--these standard "clickwrap" agreements for years now. The process seems simple enough. One click, and you're done, right? Maybe that's the case for customers. But for companies, clickwraps are more complex, incurring needless risks and costs.
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NAR Moves to Dismiss Moehrl Lawsuit
The National Association of REALTORS (NAR) moved to dismiss the Moehrl v. NAR lawsuit on the basis that the complaint misrepresents NAR rules for the operation of Multiple Listing Services (MLSs), which have long been recognized by courts across the country as protecting consumers and creating competitive, efficient markets that benefit home buyers and sellers. The filing was made in federal court in Chicago.
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GDPR and Its Effect on the US Real Estate Industry
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Acquisition Hell: The Tech Investment
One company's success becomes another's pain. Mergers and acquisitions over the last few years have taken a toll on brokerages and their tech stacks. Finding means to protect highly invested tools is becoming more difficult. Maybe the first place to begin is with the contract.
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Thoughts on the Incoming Class Action Lawsuit Filed Against Realtors
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MLSs Demand Broker Data Sovereignty
A battle was waged between MLSs and the National Association of REALTORS® against the Library of Congress, who administers copyright in America. For many years, it has been the common practice of MLSs to copyright their data set, referred to as the MLS compilation, each month or each quarter. About a year ago, the copyright office of the Library of Congress continued to receive the copyright applications but stopped issuing copyright numbers.
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Privacy Regulation for Everyone Coming Soon
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CCPA for the U.S. Real Estate Industry: An Introduction
In the last few years, there has been a renewed focus on consumer digital privacy rights around the world. Most notably, the EU's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) has been the most prominent and far-reaching attempt to regulate how businesses use private personal data. Driven by this movement, California has passed the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). Much like its predecessor, the GDPR, CCPA will significantly increase the rights of consumers to access and manage their personal data.
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How to Change Your Business Name
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How Computer Vision Helps Portals Comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act
A computer-generated voice on Facebook tells a woman viewing a page about an image. She is blind. She's never seen the photos of her family posted on the social media platform before. She smiles and explains in the video that, "...unless you have somebody to describe it to you, even having three words just helps flesh out all of the details that I can't see..." Technologies like Computer Vision are empowering millions of visually impaired Internet users to be able to perceive the world in ways they hadn't been able to before. The technology can also help companies in the United States comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), which mandates standards for disabled computer users.
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MLS Terms of Use Changes and Copyright FAQ
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Collateral Analytics Sues Nationstar and Xome for Stealing IP
Real estate brokers and MLSs are pretty familiar with Collateral Analytics. Collateral Analytics provides real estate brokers with a variety of tools, including market trends, market share and AVMs. Collateral Analytics is particularly interesting to real estate brokers because of the unique blend of MLS data and public record data. Brokers believe that MLS data introduces a level of accuracy and timeliness to analytics products, making them profoundly more accurate than Zillow Group's Zestimates.
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How to Register a Trademark
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Zillow Protects Broker Data
WAV Group supports brokers and MLSs in constructing data licensing agreements with users of data records that belong to the broker. When a company like Zillow ingests broker data, like all recipients, they must adhere to the data license agreement, which typically requires that you cannot allow the data to be used by a third party. The blog McMansionHell.com is learning the hard way that using data from Zillow without proper authority is a copyright violation that Zillow will pursue. Not only will Zillow pursue the violation, but they are contractually bound to pursue the violation. The media around the case is a bit confused, so let me try to break it down in layman's terms.
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CFPB Investigating Zillow – Brokers Consider RESPA
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Risk Management for Real Estate: Insurance Requirements
Working as a real estate agent or broker comes with an inherent amount of legal risk. That's why real estate professionals need insurance. Learn about risk management for real estate and how much insurance you need. Malpractice Liability Risks Faced by Real Estate Pros The single greatest liability exposure most real estate agents and brokers face is for malpractice lawsuits by dissatisfied buyers or sellers. They could allege things like fraud, misrepresentations, negligence, failure to disclose and other violations of the agent's or broker's legal and fiduciary duties. Even if you're innocent, a malpractice lawsuit can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. If you're a sole proprietor or partner in a partnership, you'll be personally liable for malpractice lawsuits. You can avoid personal liability if you form a corporation or limited liability company LLC. But, not as much as you might think. No limited liability entity protects you from personal liability for your own malpractice or other personal wrongdoing. If your business doesn't have enough assets to pay a judgment obtained against you, your personal assets are liable. Thus, your personal assets will always be on the line if you're being sued for malpractice. This is why you should always have errors and omissions insurance. Example: Janet, a real estate broker, forms a corporation of which she is the sole shareholder. She represents a client in the sale of a home. After a sale closes, the buyer discovers that severe building defects were not disclosed. The buyer sues Janet and her client, the seller, for fraud. Janet is incorporated but she could be held personally liable (along with her corporation) for any damages caused by her alleged fraud. Both Janet's personal assets and those of her corporation are at risk.
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Top 5 Weirdest Real Estate Regulations Across North America
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DMCA Safe Harbor Alert for Broker Websites
The Digital Millennium Copyright Act provides some protection to website owners from tiresome litigation when an image or other copyrighted content is found to be on their website. Before December 31st of next year, you should electronically register your designated agent. Even if you filed before using the old paper method, you must refile electronically by Dec. 31, 2017, or your DMCA Safe Harbor will no longer be in effect. By now, I think that every website owner has gotten some form of letter from Getty Images or other copyright trolls – and this will continue. In fact, now that the Copyright office allows firms to electronically submit thousands of images for copyright protection, it is likely to cause more copyright claims for photos. The safe harbor provision works something like this. First, you must have a DMCA notice on your website. WAV Group recommends that you have an attorney review your DMCA and your Terms of Use each year to assure that you are in compliance with current laws. While you are at it, plan to update the copyright on your site to ©2017. Also make sure that you incorporate the National Association of REALTORS® guidance on the Americans with Disabilities Act by adding a statement into your terms of use, like, "If you have a disability that is preventing you from experiencing this website, call..." The most important part of compliance with the DMCA Safe Harbor is that you pay a fee and designate an agent for any copyright violations. Under the Safe Harbor Act, if you are found to be infringing, the copyright holder will notify you to take it down. If you comply with the notice, the issue should be resolved unless there are extenuating circumstances. There is a lot more information at copyright.gov.
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School Ratings: The Legal Gray Area
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Real Estate Companies Should Address Website Accessibility to Avoid Lawsuits
The business of real estate has become increasingly digital, and agents and consumers rely on websites to share and find real estate information, market homes and conduct property searches. In fact, according to new data from the National Association of Realtors®, 95 percent of all recent buyers used the internet at some point during the home search process. For that reason, it's important that all consumers, including those with disabilities, have equal access to real estate agent and company websites. That's according to panelists at a session Sunday about website accessibility best practices during the 2016 REALTORS® Conference & Expo. Alisa Carr, partner at Leech Tishman in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania is a litigator and a real estate transaction lawyer and said that while the Americans with Disabilities Act predates widespread use of the internet and courts have been split on the issue, recent court cases have found that a business's accessibility obligations do extend to its website and mobile applications. Carr recommended companies familiarize themselves with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 AA posted at www.w3.org, which is a technical standard created by the World Wide Web Consortium to help make sites more accessible. "It's a very user-friendly website and a great resource to educate you on how to start to make your sites compliant," she said. "Make sure your vendors are using these standards and understand that your site needs to be accessible, and not just navigable and pretty. Also, hold your designer to these standards to ensure that the site continues to remain in compliance as content evolves."
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Real Estate Professional Exception to Passive Loss Rules
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Choosing the Legal Form for Your Real Estate Business
Most real estate agents are independent contractors—self-employed business owners who are affiliated with a licensed real estate broker in their state. As such, they are running independent businesses, even though they must work under a licensed broker's supervision. This post will help guide real estate agents and brokers on how to choose the correct real estate legal forms. Of course, real estate brokers are also running businesses—they usually own a real estate brokerage firm, either themselves or with other brokers, for which one or more agents work. Every business has a legal form. If you're working as a broker or agent right now, you are almost certainly involved in one of the following types of business entities: sole proprietorship partnership corporation, or limited liability company (LLC). The sole proprietorship and partnership are the "default" entities— they come into existence automatically unless a business's owners take the steps necessary to form one of the other entities.
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Why the Preliminary Title Report Is Your New "BFF"
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Data Security is the Law
Most cybercrime experts say it isn't "if" your data will be breached, it's "when." And real estate brokers must understand that securing data isn't just good business practice — it's the law. Today, 47 states have data security and private protection laws on the books to safeguard consumers and businesses when breaches occur (Washington, D.C., Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands also have laws). Melanie Wyne, senior technology policy representative at the National Association of REALTORS®, says these state laws typically explain what constitutes a breach, how businesses or organizations should notify their clients when a breach happens, and whether there are any exemptions to the law. These laws also describe what kinds of personal information must be secured, such as social security numbers, driver's license numbers, and financial account information. Wyne says the laws may vary but that there is one common denominator: "What's true for all the state laws is that they require having encryption on any personal data." According to the Electronic Privacy Information Center, Massachusetts' data breach notification law is one of the most comprehensive in the country. It establishes minimum standards that any person, agency, or entity that owns or licenses personal information on Massachusetts' residents must meet and requires the implementation of "a comprehensive information security program." Some of the other requirements include security training for employees, secure storage, protocols for strong user authentication, prevention of terminated employees from accessing records containing personal information, and annual reviews of the scope of security measures.
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Know How to Explain the Mediation Clause in Your Real Estate Contract to Buyer and Sellers
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[FAA UPDATE] The Dream of Using Drones for Real Estate is Becoming A Reality
So, you want to use a drone for real estate purposes. Your competitor is doing it and their videos are coming out in 4K high definition footage and are being posted across their social media channels and websites. So why can't you do the same? Well, you can, but the answer is a bit more complicated than that. Let's take an in-depth look at this topic so you can have a better understanding of what's going on in the world of drones. Commercial drone use is currently banned by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in the United States. However, the FAA does allow the use of drones for recreation. The FAA specifically defines hobby or recreational use as "Taking photographs with a model aircraft for personal use." On the other hand, they define commercial use as "A Realtor using a model aircraft to photograph a property that he is trying to sell and using the photos in the property's real estate listing." That's pretty black and white. So is your competitor who's posting aerial footage of his newest property breaking the law? If they don't have an exemption from the FAA, then yes, they are. They might be breaking the law, but the FAA isn't running around writing citations for every real estate company using a drone to film a property. They just don't have the resources for that. Your competition might be breaking FAA regulations, but a lot of companies are, and those companies could face heavy consequences, including large fines. If you want to use drones to take videos or pictures of your properties, then you'll need to be granted permission by obtaining an FAA Section 333 Exemption. The FAA isn't sitting around denying businesses the Section 333 Exemption either. They're actually approving a surprising number of exemptions due to pressure coming from all types of businesses, not just real estate companies. As of July 2015, the FAA has officially approved 840+ exemptions, allowing companies to use drones for commercial use. The process isn't quick, as you can expect when working with a government agency like the FAA, but it has been sped up a lot since last year. Currently, it only takes two to three months to be approved.
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Don't Get Thrown by Doc Overhaul
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Interest Minimizer Program Sued by Feds for Misleading Consumers
In recent real estate borrowing news, the "Interest Minimizer" mortgage program touted as "one of the greatest financial secrets of our time," promising to save borrowers thousands in mortgage interest, is in hot water with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) for misleading consumers and making false promises. Federal lawsuit filed The May 11th filing named the program, offered by Nationwide, its subsidiary Loan Payment Administration, and Daniel Lipsky, founder/president/officer/owner, on behalf of 10,000 California consumers enrolled in the program. It just doesn't add up Consumers enrolled in the program send half their monthly mortgage payment every two weeks, making an additional monthly payment annually. However, Nationwide charges the participants a setup fee of up to $995, then a $3.50 biweekly processing fee. The CFPB alleges consumers end up paying more in fees than they save in interest for several years. Only about a quarter of consumers have been enrolled longer than four years. Worse yet, some leave the program without having saved any money at all. Nationwide, however, collected about $49 million in setup fees. A sad example CFPB's example demonstrates for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage on a $160,204 loan with 4.125% interest, a consumer would not save enough to recoup fees paid to Nationwide until nine years into the program. Monthly interest savings wouldn't be realized until 14 years – more than 20 years to realize half the savings promised.
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ListHub/Zillow Divorce Stimulates Discussion
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Could You Be Stealing Stock Photos?
I'm part of a couple of different business groups. In the last two months, a serious but surprising topic has come up among the group members three times. My professional peers were contacted by lawyers telling them that they'd used an image on their blog without paying for it or citing its source. If this is something you've ever done, say, scrolled through Google images to find what looks like a great pic to include with your latest blog article, you could be the next facing legal action. So, I have to ask, who took the photo in your blog post? And did you pay for it? Could you be stealing stock photos? "Come on," I can practically hear you saying, "I don't want to/can't afford to buy a new image every single time I post a new article to my blog." Well, I have two responses to that: 1) It's a lot more affordable than you might think (and a LOT more affordable than legal fines). Plus, you can rest easy knowing you're covered if you do purchase all your images. 2) There actually are many free resources for images that you can use safely. Designmodo recently published a Carrie Cousins article on great places to source free stock photography. Titled 16 Places to Find the Best Free Stock Photos, it's just that – a comprehensive and fabulous list of 16 separate sources of free stock imagery. Cousins' selections include: 1. Raumrot2. Unsplash3. Little Visuals
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Preparing Your Real Estate Business for Canadian Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL)
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And the Verdict Is ...
Guest contributor Pamela Dittmer McKuen of REALTOR®Mag says: I believe everyone should go to law school and not practice law. Law school teaches you communication skills and a thought process that are very advantageous in anything you do. My parents owned a Century 21 franchise, so I grew up in the business and knew our market. I graduated from Fordham Law School in 1985 and spent the next four years as a real estate attorney, mostly working in the area of conveyances. But I realized I wanted to be involved in the entire transaction, not just part of it. At that time RE/MAX was new in our area. I liked its business model, which I see as more of a salesperson-oriented business than a broker-oriented business. I got my broker-owner license and opened our office in 1991. My parents were in the process of shutting down their business, so I moved into their space. They had 150 agents, and about 20 of them stayed with me. The rest moved on. Productivity Starts with Prospecting Our fundamental belief is that prospecting is the key to success. Technology is important, but it can be stifling at times. It's easy to get caught up in activities that are not productive. Real estate is a people business. You have to be out meeting people and shaking hands.
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Broker AVMs (Part 5): Suggestions for NAR
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Broker AVMs (Part 4): NAR’s Proposed Policy
This is part four in a series that I've now concluded will have five parts on the question of whether and how brokers participating in MLS may use listing data of other brokers to power AVMs sold into the real estate vertical. See Part 1 for an intro and Part 2 for advice that NAR gave MLSs in 2013. I examined a letter from The Realty Alliance (TRA) on this subject in Part 3. This post discusses the three broad questions I think NAR needs to answer, describes the current proposal for NAR's policy committee, and examines whether that proposal answers my three questions. I conclude that it does not. Decisions, decisions The NAR multiple listing policy committee has three important and distinct decisions to make at its May meetings in D.C. on the broker AVM issue: 1. Are AVMs indistinguishable for policy purposes from BPOs and CMAs? In TRA's view, the answer is 'yes', and that appears to be the view previously expressed by NAR policy staffers. Both TRA and NAR staffers appear to think that this is a foregone conclusion, but I noted some hedging on that from NAR last fall, and it's plainly a fact that the ML policy committee has never given an answer to this question. If the answer to this question is 'yes,' then no listing broker permission need be obtained for a participant to use MLS data of all brokers in an AVM application (subject to NAR's other policies of general application). In other words, there really cannot be a listing broker opt-out under this view. The committee would also need to address question 2. If the answer to this question 1 is 'no,' then NAR needs to decide whether AVMs get different treatment under its policies or if they are simply not permitted.
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Broker AVMs (Part 3): The Realty Alliance's Position
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Broker AVMs (Part 2): Previous NAR Policy Guidance
This is the second part of an x-part series on the question of MLS participants using listing data from MLS to produce AVMs. See the intro post for background. The text below is from a summary our firm prepared for lawyers attending the Council of MLS's legal seminar in Boise, Idaho last fall. Note that it does not reflect a position by CMLS on the matters discussed in it. Rather, it was our effort on CMLS's behalf to understand the views of NAR policy staff on the matters discussed in it. Note, too, that NAR staff's position may have evolved since last fall. I still think it's a helpful overview of the issue and current policy, against which we can contrast current proposals. We are sharing it with CMLS's permission. It's long-ish... sorry about that. Preliminary dialog with NAR staff: Brokers building "analytic tools" with MLS data Prepared by Larson/Sobotka PLLC on behalf of CMLS September 26, 2013 In August 2013, CMLS legal counsel presented written questions/comments to NAR intended to clarify NAR policy on a matter of interest to MLSs in the U.S. and therefore of interest to the Council of Multiple Listing Services (CMLS). The results are offered here in the form of a dialog, with CMLS's legal counsel's comments, questions, etc., in black serif type on the left margin, and NAR policy staff's responses of August 28, 2013, in blue sans-serif font, indented from the left margin. CMLS recognizes that any response from NAR is limited in scope to the situations described below and might be different if the assertions characterized below as facts prove to be false.
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Your Content and the Doctrine of Fair Use
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Cybersquatting: New potential problems, and possible solutions
It's hard to believe that almost five years have passed since I posted on this blog about cybersquatting, or typo-squatting. You can read that older post to get the basic ideas; but the examples I gave there no longer work. (I foresaw at the time that my post might prompt action by the broker I used as an example; I'm glad I was right.) As I noted in that older post: A common problem in the industry is that large brokerage firms are great targets for cybersquatters. According to the Anti-cybersquatting Consumer Protection Act (15 U.S.C. 1125(d)) or ACPA, cybersquatting, or cyberpiracy, is registering, trafficking in, or using a domain name identical to or confusingly similar to someone else's trade- or service mark in bad faith. The most common form in our industry results in folks registering a domain name that is a slight variation of a broker's firm name (also called "typosquatting"), putting up a page on the resulting domain, and selling real-estate-related links on the page. In most cases, this violates the trade- or service marks of the broker and may violate the ACPA. You should be prepared for a whole new wave of problems associated with cybersquatting in the coming couple years, as ICANN (the international regulator of Internet domain names) has received nearly two thousand applications for new top-level domains (TLDs), the part of a domain to the right of the last dot: e.g., .COM, .NET, .ORG.
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Broker Intellectual Property At Risk
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Expiration of the Mortgage Debt Forgiveness Relief Act Will Have Little Impact
This post comes to us from myShortTrack: Now that the shutdown has passed, and the next 'fiscal cliff' is still a little ways away, the Mortgage Debt Forgiveness Relief Act of 2007 is back in the news. The Act is once again set to expire at the end of this year, after being extended last year. And once again, people are starting to make a really big deal about its expiration. As I explained last year, it's all a waste of breath. It doesn't really matter if it expires. People are lining up predicting both its extension and its demise. On the demise side, there is the $1.3 billion/year in uncollected revenues, as projected by the Congressional Budget Office. On the extension side, people point to the $1.3 billion/year tax 'increase' of not extending it and claim that it will destroy the short sale market and borrower participation. Here's a short (less than two minutes) video describing the reality of the expiration of the Mortgage Debt Forgiveness Relief Act. Let us know if you think it helps make things clearer, and if it's helpful to your sellers and owners facing foreclosure or pursuing a short sale.
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How do laws protecting consumer privacy affect your business?
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Online Oversight
Guest contributor G.M. Filisko of REALTOR®Mag says: Odds are that some of your sales associates are online at this very moment. Maybe they're updating their Facebook status. Or uploading a blog post. Or retooling their Web site. But what if they're doing something that creates liability for your brokerage? Brokers are right to be concerned about the online presence of their agents. It's up to you to develop a policy for your office that details online activities that are acceptable and unacceptable from a business standpoint­—and to make sure associates know they're accountable. Policy? What Policy? If you haven't already created guidelines for your associates' online behavior, you're in good company. "I'd say that 5 percent of brokers, at most, have policies," estimates Nobu Hata, Chicago-based director of digital engagement at the National Association of REALTORS®. "Most policies I've seen have been at larger brokerages. They have counsel who've recommended they enact a policy, or they have a big enough cadre of sales associates that someone's already gotten them in trouble." It's not that brokers aren't paying attention to the risks, Hata says. Many are. But they don't want to tighten the reins so much that sales associates balk—and end up leaving. But, as any defense attorney will tell you, a written policy is wise. "Every broker should have one, whether the broker has two or 200 salespeople," Hata says. "Sales associates do a lot of things online on behalf of their brokers, whether it's marketing listings or performing client care, and there's so much gray area." A written policy reduces the chance for misunderstandings.
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Cloudy With a Chance of Disaster
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Legal Traps in Social Media: What Every Business Owner Should Know
As of October 2012, there were over one billion active users on Facebook. Although the stock of Facebook has experienced a roller-coaster ride, which has mostly been on the first steep downhill part of the track, the slide probably says little about the future of Facebook and social media. Technology and innovation behind social media are experiencing a rapid rate of change, and the law usually lags, but an understanding of legal issues is important to avoid liability. Here's what business owners need to know to avoid legal traps in social media. User vs. provider On a simplistic level, there are two ways to approach social media from a legal perspective. One is from the perspective of the user and the other is from the perspective of the provider of social media. Bloggers and users of social media need to be concerned about liability for what they are posting, and providers of social media portals—including businesses—need to be concerned about potential liability for simply making the social media vehicle available. Original content or else When posting content on social media, or in any other environment, there are some basic rules to follow. All content should be original to the person (or company) posting, or there should be a license to post the content. Original works, including text, graphics and photos, are protectable under copyright law. Except in limited circumstances, the owner must grant permission to use or post the content; failure to obtain permission constitutes infringement. Granting attribution, or identifying the owner of the content, is not sufficient for compliance with copyright law. Although it is easy to rationalize that no damages could possibly flow from a blog or other post, statutory damages of up to $150,000 in the case of willful infringement are available.
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E-mail Could Be Binding
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Your Real Estate Website is Illegal
It is November, that time of year when you need to schedule the update on your copyright to © 2013 before January 1. But there is more that you should be considering--a revision to the way that you handle the terms of use. Most real estate websites place their terms of use conspicuously deep down in the footer of their website, along with their privacy policy. This is the way that it has been done for years. However, a court case involving Amazon.com subsidiary Zappos just changed all of that. In the Zappos case, 24 million consumer email addresses where stolen by hackers. Zappos went to arbitration and settled the case. The judge in the case threw out the arbitrated settlement for two reasons. The Zappos terms of use indicate that they can change the agreement at any time. The judge ruled that this is inherently unfair, and previous courts have invalidated contracts on those grounds before. The consumer did not explicitly agree to the Privacy Policy or Terms of Use.
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REALTOR bloggers should watch their words
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Midyear Recap: RPPSI, Listings on Social Media, and the Franchisor IDX Policy (and Why I Will Opt In)
Fair warning: Long post ahead… Three days of mid-May were spent in Washington, D.C. attending the 2011 REALTOR® Midyear Legislative Meetings and Trade Expo (more commonly referred to as simply “Midyear”). This promised to be a lively event as there were some major issues on the table: RPPSI, “Franchisor IDX” and “Display of listings via RSS and Social Media.” Thoughts on RPPSI “RPPSI” the “REALTOR® Party Political Survival Initiative” was hotly debated prior to Midyear. The overwhelming sentiment online seemed to me to be against this initiative and its $40 dues increase. Today, however, the NAR Board of Directors “overwhelmingly approved” the initiative and dues increase. This is exactly what I thought would happen when I wrote, Op-Ed: The REALTOR® Party. NAR Proposes the REALTOR® Party Political Survival Initiative.
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Your Social Media Emergency Response Kit
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Are You Managing Your Risk?
"Most of us would rather risk catastrophe than read the directions." ~ Mignon McLaughlin Privacy and information security rules and regulations are changing monthly. Do you know what your legal obligations are to your customers, prospects, associates, vendors, and employees? Have you fully covered your assets? Today's maze of enacted laws, pending legislation and best management practices related to privacy and information security issues is enough to make even the most savvy business person's head spin. Did you know that there are different laws being proposed nationwide and in Congress on these subjects almost daily? Are you tracking them to make sure you know if and how they will affect your business, and adapting your business model accordingly? Do you know what you need to do to comply with the ones that have been recently enacted to reduce your legal exposure and risk?
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7 Ways to Avoid a Tax Audit for 2010
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Smarter Agent Sues 13 Real Estate Technology Vendors!
Smarter Agent, provider of mobile search services for the real estate industry filed a law suit on March 26, 2010 in Delaware District Court to sue the following companies for infringement of their patent 35:271. Boopsie Inc. Classified Ventures LLC Hotpads Inc. IDX Inc. Move Inc. RealSelect Inc. Primedia Inc. Consumer Source Inc. Trulia Inc. Zillow Inc. ZipRealty Inc. Multifamily Technology Solutions Inc. dba MyNewPlace TRSoft Inc. dba Planetre
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Is Your Website Accessible to All?
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Need Legal or Consulting Services?
Larson/Sobotka is a consulting firm and a law firm specializing in offering services to the real estate industry. Specifically they focus their service offerings on technology vendors to the real estate industry, MLS service providers, Associations of REALTORS® (State, Local, National), and real estate brokers. Their legal practices focus on a variety of dimensions throughout the real estate industry including ecommerce, databases, Web branding issues, and rule-making for online communities. Larson/Sobotka supported RE Technology in the development of many of its business documents. Legal services also extend to providing copyright, trademark, Internet/computer and technology licensing counsel.
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