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5 Things Real Estate Photographers Wish Sellers Did -- and Did Not -- Do
Working with hundreds of photographers nationwide who have delivered more than 4,000,000 images to help real estate agents sell and rent more than $35 billion in listings, we've come to feel their pain when something doesn't go as planned. That's why we polled more than 100 professional real estate photographers who work with HomeJab to get their "rants and raves" for listing shoots. We already know from a large body of research that professional real estate photography helps sell homes faster and for more money. The good news from the survey results is that most of the time – 67% – of professional real estate photographers have a great experience with highly cooperative sellers. But that still means that sellers are not as cooperative as they should be during one in three listing photo assignments, and, sometimes, surprisingly, they are uncooperative. Fortunately, our "rants and raves" survey uncovered a series of "best practices" for home sellers – comments, ideas, and suggestions shared almost universally by our photo pros. Photographer rants Here are the top five things professional real estate photographers wish all sellers did — that still is missing from too many shoots: Declutter – 95% Remove objects in the way of a photo (toys, bikes, hoses, etc.) – 86% Clean the house – 75% Fix light bulbs – 73% Clean pathways and driveways (remove cars) – 54% Again, remember that most shoots go well, and most of the things on this list are taken care of before the photographer arrives. Overall, real estate agents are doing an exceptional job of educating sellers and ensuring they take the steps necessary to prep their homes before the appointment. However, one item shared by photographers was a bit surprising – and this might be an opportunity for all agents to clarify the concept of when to declutter. The survey found that the "one thing that sellers forget" that bothers professional real estate photographers most is decluttering during the shoot. It turns out that many sellers attempt to declutter while the photographer is shooting, going room by room, clearing clutter one room at a time just before the photographer shoots! A photographer from Lakeland, Florida described the impact of doing this best, saying, "Moving clutter room-to-room like musical chairs disrupts the flow and slows down the process." In addition, he points out that this approach can add significant additional time to a shoot. Another photographer from Chicago shared the frustration, explaining, "Many sellers begin prepping after I arrive. They should know the home should be ready upon arrival." That's excellent advice for sellers, but it also should nudge real estate agents to ask their sellers to finish all decluttering before the photographers shows up at their door. Seller raves The survey also asked professional real estate photographers about the one thing sellers do that they appreciate most. The consensus is no surprise: having the house ready when they arrive. An Austin-based photographer says puts it succinctly: "decluttered – neat and tidy" is a huge help. A veteran photographer from Greenwood Village, Colorado, adds, "A place that's ready to go when I arrive – that's awesome." Photographers also were asked, "What is the one thing a seller can do to make your job easier?" Again, the answers were mixed, sometimes even contradictory. One point of contention: should the seller hang around during the shoot – or get out of the house? What was clear was the need for sellers to stay out of the way during a shoot. Some suggested that sellers should leave during the shoot. But other photographers want them to stay "within earshot" if they need permission to move an object that's in the way, for example. Another point of disagreement: some photographers don't want the seller to interrupt with questions, while others enjoy a good banter back-and-forth with a seller. The best approach: sellers should ask what they can do to make the professional's job easier upfront. The professional tells us they will get better photos if they do. For sellers, photographers had a few other suggestions to make their shoot easier, including controlling pets, parking cars away from the property, and ensuring the photographer has access to the home when they arrive. Advice to real estate agents Photographers often rely on the seller's real estate agent to make sure everything is ready before they show up. But, again, three out of four times, that happens. Yet, for all those other times, photographers shared some advice for agents. "Good agents will arrive at a property ahead of time and turn on all the lights and clean up anything that shouldn't be there," said a Cherry Hill, New Jersey-based photographer, adding, "Bad agents show up late and demand that everything be cleaned to perfection." The survey points to three things photographers wished every agent told their seller, including: Photographers cannot retouch photos or remove something (the seller's agent provides editing instructions, and HomeJab handles the editing) How much time the photographer will need. Photographers can't send the photos directly to the seller. Instead, the seller will get them from their agent. The survey also found three things that professional real estate photographers appreciate most when they arrive at a shoot: All the lights are on, fans and TVs are off, and blinds or shades are open Pets are secured, the house is clear of other people, and the seller stays out of the way Access is available for photographers when they arrive. One professional offered this parting comment: "Do not underestimate the photographer. We are part of the success of the property's sale." Joe Jesuele is the founder and CEO of HomeJab, America's most popular and reliable on-demand professional real estate photography and video marketplace for real estate pros and architect of the real NFT Marketplace at real.art. HomeJab delivers over 4,000,000 images to help agents sell and rent more than $35 billion in listings.
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Reduce Buyer Frustration with Effective Financing Education and Preparation
Money may or may not buy happiness, but you for sure need it to buy a house. For most people that means getting a mortgage. Thirty-five percent of frustrated homebuyers in the WAV Group Homebuyer Frustration Report pointed to the mortgage process being a source of their frustration. One respondent in the study suggested, "There needs to be more workers in the mortgage field to make it run faster." Buyers just want a seamless experience from home search to the closing table. This is one of the reasons more brokerages have started offering ancillary services such as title and mortgage. Financing complications or delays are a constant struggle in any market, and when the market is moving fast and is super competitive, like it has been recently, it can get even more stressful. Here are some important points your team should add to their initial buyer education consultation. Review Their Credit Report Even if there is nothing incorrect or alarming to find on the report, it is quite likely that there is something on their report they could clarify or update which may get them a better score and possibly a better rate on the mortgage. So it is certainly worth the effort. Suggest they do this BEFORE trying to qualify for a mortgage. Get Organized Buyers will need to track down their tax returns, print out paystubs, and if they are self-employed, they will want their profit and loss statements for at least two years. There will likely be delays with the mortgage company processing documents. Do not add to that delay by not having the documents ready to submit and re-submit when requested. Get Pre-Approved Even before they find a house to make an offer on, buyers need to know how much they can afford. The pre-approval letter is an important step in the process, but it is not the end of the road. Buyers need to understand that there is still more work to be done once they find the house they want to buy. Put the Mortgage Company on Speed Dial Once a house is selected, there is an entirely different approval process before the mortgage will be ready to fund. Buyers should be prepared to stay in touch with the lender throughout the process, and the agent should be tracking the process as well. They should proactively check on the status of the mortgage consistently once the offer is made until it is ready to fund on closing day. Even the most prepared of buyers can sometimes get frustrated. As another respondent in the WAV Group Homebuyer Frustration Report said, they wish there were "Clearer financial requirements to close." As a neutral third-party, your agents can act as part counselor and part advisor for homebuyers trying to figure out the mortgage process. Sometimes they will just not understand what the mortgage company is asking for, or why they are asking for it. If your team can explain a term or help them get a document, that can help relieve some of the stress. Get all the insights and data from the WAV Group 2022 Homebuyer Frustration Report to see how you can set your next buyer up for a smoother home buying experience. Download now! To view the original article, visit the WAV Group blog.
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Nearly 3 Out of 5 Realtors Say Limited Inventory Prevented Clients from Buying Homes in 2021
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Minimize Buyer Frustration with Adequate Education Upfront
The WAV Group's recent study on homebuyer frustration reveals many pain points that homebuyers have been experiencing in the recent seller's market. While some of the frustration is unique to the market conditions of 2020 and 202, like multiple bid situations, there are still many insights that can help agents prepare their clients for the process regardless of market conditions. To download a copy of the report, click HERE. Setting expectations and education about every step of a transaction right from the start is a key opportunity to improve service levels. Certainly first-time home buyers don't know what they don't know yet, but even experienced homebuyers need to know how different the process is in the extreme seller's market we're experiencing today. Embroiled in so many stressful and unsuccessful transactions today, agents may lose the perspective of the average person who purchases just a few homes in their lifetime. When asked about improving the homebuying experience, one respondent said, "It is far too complicated and involved. A regular person can barely grasp all the hoops you have to jump through." With that in mind, agents may want to consider a buyer education session before beginning the process of purchasing a home. Most agents use a listing presentation to win the listings, but few take the time to sit down with their buyers and talk through the entire process from start to finish. What should be in your pre-purchase buyer education presentation? Timeline Under perfect conditions, this would be the relative timeline of events from initial home search online all the way to unpacking the dishes in their new home. Checklists can be very helpful in this section of the presentation. Be sure to cover the common time periods in your local market for appraisals, surveys, and home inspections. This is also the perfect opportunity to set expectations for showing appointments, your availability on nights and weekends, and preferred communication methods. Current Market Conditions Normally, finding a new listing online on a Thursday, then going to see it on Saturday, and then making a reasonably below asking price offer the following Wednesday is a perfectly acceptable timeline. Not in today's market. Are houses selling in weeks, days, or—as we saw recently—in hours? What price range should they be looking in to be able to stay on budget in a bidding situation? Should they get pre-qualified for a mortgage? Do they fully understand homeownership costs BEYOND the mortgage and downpayment? Some respondents said they stretched to buy the home at the top of their price range and now they're struggling to afford maintenance, utilities and general repairs. Common Hurdles You Can Warn Them About Don't shy away from sharing the challenges in today's market, and in any real estate market, that have derailed past clients. Remember, they are hiring you for your experience so that they don't have to learn the hard way. Some of these situations, like lower than expected appraisals or major repairs needed, may not be pleasant to talk about, but your clients need to be prepared for possible scenarios and know that they will have remedies available to them if those situations occur. Many of the frustrations with the homebuying process can be mitigated by education and communication. As another respondent said, "Wish there was more explanation of the timeline for when things happen and what the next steps would be." To see all the insights and data from the WAV Group Homebuyer Frustration Report, download the full report for free by using promo code Frustration at checkout. To view the original article, visit the WAV Group blog.
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72% of Recent Homebuyers Report Feeling Some Level of Frustration with Their Home Purchase
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What Are the Most Popular Listing Photos? How Computer Vision Helped Answer This Question
The positive impacts of technology on our daily lives continues to help us become more productive by saving us time. Think about it. Before the internet, if you wanted to research something, you walked, drove, or biked to a library. Then you asked a librarian for ideas of where to find what you needed. Next, they would send you to the "card catalog," which stored books sorted by Dewey Decimal numbers on index cards. After you find the card with the book title and its number, you meander through aisles of books to hunt down the right one, hopefully, filed in the correct place. Or, at the very least, you had to crack open an encyclopedia: World Book or Encyclopedia Britannica, depending on what information you needed. Today, you just "Google" or ask Alexa for the information you need. Making us more productive Sometimes, technology gets a bad rap, especially when you consider what used to take hours – like the trek to a library – now takes minutes or even seconds. Computer vision is a massive breakthrough in time savings and increased productivity. It takes care of some of the most mundane tasks, freeing resources to do more important things. We discovered the value of computer vision firsthand at HomeJab when we wanted to answer the question, "What are the most popular real estate listing photos?" Now we could have answered this without enlisting the help of artificial intelligence firm Restb.ai. We had the sample data: 14,000 professionally shot photos contracted by listing agents for properties listed for sale in early June 2022. To accomplish this, we would need a team of people to manually go through every photo, look at each one, determine what was in the picture, and sort it into a pile. Later, we would have to count all the photos in each stack to decide which images of homes for sale were the most popular. It would take a team to sort through thousands of photos to accomplish this study. However, Restb.ai did it in a matter of minutes. Compiling the results Using the power of computer vision, Restb.ai explains its founder and CEO, Xavi Hernando, can sort through thousands of photographs from homes currently for sale, use its computer vision technology to identify the type of photo, and then classify and sort the images. It helps that HomeJab can provide them with the highest quality images, as all are by professional real estate photographers. But it is still stunning to watch how fast everything comes together. The process Restb.ai uses also compiles the results, eliminating the need to do the math and figure out the ranking of the most popular photos. The science for all of this is built-in. Admittedly, most experienced agents – and professional real estate photographers – might not find many surprises in the results. But the truth is, before we studied the photos, all we had were assumptions, not facts. Because before the HomeJab study, no one took the time and effort to figure out the most popular photos. And there were a few surprises in the data. But most importantly, perhaps, is we have a new benchmark and can look at photo trends in the future. And we have a fast and smart way to accomplish the task. What are the most popular photos? The new data from HomeJab finds that the most popular real estate listing photo is not the home's front exterior. Instead, bedroom photos were ranked first, barely nudging out kitchen photos. Front exterior shots placed a distant fifth. Living room photos landed third. What's interesting about that is that a couple of decades ago, home builders kept making the living rooms smaller. Some folks believe that the living room, at the time, was headed for extinction; some still do. However, photo popularity shows that's not the most likely outcome. Here's a recap of the HomeJab Top 15 most popular photos used to sell homes: Bedrooms – 11.92% Kitchen – 11.90% Living room – 10.79% Bathroom – 9.75% Front exterior – 8.70% Dining area – 4.48% Aerial – 4.32% Yard – 3.00% Back exterior – 2.48% Patio terrace – 2.10% Home office – 1.84% Laundry room – 1.81% Deck – 1.72% Hallway – 1.39% Foyer – 1.26% The bottom six: Basement – 1.22% Garage – 1.12% Front door – 1.11% Pool – 1.11% Stairs – .93% Walk-In closets – .66% Note: Other miscellaneous photos comprised the remaining 16.38%. It will be interesting to see if – and how – these numbers change over time. The number one trend to watch out for is drone footage for aerial photography and video, especially with the increased accessibility and affordability. And because of the pandemic, will we see more photos of home offices in the future? Time will tell. A summary report on this new HomeJab study is available here. Joe Jesuele is the founder and CEO of HomeJab, America's most popular and reliable on-demand professional real estate photography and video marketplace for real estate pros and architect of the real NFT Marketplace at real.art. HomeJab delivers over 4,000,000 images to help agents sell and rent more than $35 billion in listings.
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Realtors See Sharp Increase in Homes with Green Features
The number of Realtors involved with buying or selling a property with green features has significantly increased in the past year, according to a recent study from the National Association of Realtors. The 2022 REALTORS and Sustainability Report surveyed NAR members nationwide regarding sustainability issues currently facing the real estate industry. Half of agents and brokers surveyed said they helped a client buy or sell a property with green features during the past 12 months, a notable jump compared to 32% in 2021. Nearly two out of three respondents – 63% – said that energy efficiency promotion in listings was very or somewhat valuable. Over half of agents and brokers – 51% – found that their clients were somewhat or very interested in sustainability. And 35% reported that their multiple listing service features green data fields. Among those with green data fields in their MLS, the top ways they were used were to promote green features (35%), energy information (24%) and green certifications (13%). "Sustainability continues to play a growing role in consumers' purchasing decisions, and this is becoming even more prevalent in the real estate market," said NAR President Leslie Rouda Smith, a Realtor® from Plano, Texas, and a broker associate at Dave Perry-Miller Real Estate in Dallas. "With the residential property market, in particular, home buyers have expressed increased interest in eco-friendly factors like solar panels and energy efficiency." Roughly three out of four Realtors® – 77% – said that properties with rooftop solar panels were available in their market. These numbers were highest in the West (89%) and Northeast (86%). Thirty-six percent said that homes with solar panels increased the perceived property value, compared to 30% that said they had no effect. Source:  The report also noted rising anxiety among Realtors® about the effect of climate change and extreme weather events on their businesses. More than one out of three respondents – 34% – said they were very or somewhat concerned about the impact of extreme weather events on the housing market. Jessica Lautz, NAR vice president of demographics and behavioral insights, said that the increased focus on sustainability in recent years is a win-win for all homeowners. "More sustainable homes bring benefits to homeowners like cost savings from energy efficiency, health benefits from improved indoor air quality, and increased comfort and durability from material use and construction, and may also increase resale value," Lautz said.
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NAR Study Shows Lack of Affordable Housing Biggest Obstacle to Home Buying
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New HomeJab Study Reveals 'Blue vs. Red' State Agent Marketing Spend
After studying more than 43,000 professional real estate photography assignments over the last five years, at HomeJab, we discovered a significant difference in the amount of marketing dollars agents spent for listings before the pandemic and what they spent coming out of the height of the COVID-19 outbreak. First, we found geographic differences in the average listing photography order amount among the nation's five major regions. Second, digging deeper into the state-level data, we found a significant difference in spending by agents in prominent "Blue states" versus "Red states." Prominent "Blue states," including New York, Massachusetts, California, and Illinois, show significant increases in marketing spend for real estate listing photography services since the pandemic. Our research shows the difference is significant: New York: +27.9% Massachusetts: +18.5% California: +9.7% Illinois: +7.7% On the other hand, prominent "Red states," including South Carolina, North Carolina, Texas, and Florida, show either decreases or modest increases in marketing spend for real estate listing photography services since the pandemic began. Again, the differences are significant: South Carolina: -23.4% North Carolina: -16.5% Texas: -0.1% Florida: +6.3% These differences shouldn't be surprising – the fact that these Red states spent less. The banning of open houses happened faster and lasted longer in Blue states. Red states, as a result, were not as dependent on 3D tours and other real estate photography services that help remote buyers make home purchases. Clearly, buyers and sellers in Blue states needed these services and needed them longer than those in Red states, where lockdowns typically ended sooner. A previous HomeJab study looked at the impact of the pandemic on the type of photography services that real estate agents ordered. That study found evidence supporting these spending trends. When the pandemic shutdown almost all open houses, the percentage of video and 3D virtual tours ordered by agents jumped significantly nationwide from 37% to 53% of all photo shoot orders. Last year, as open houses returned, this percentage went down slightly to 48% but remained higher than pre-pandemic levels for 2019. We expect real estate agents using HomeJab to continue to include video and 3D tours as part of their "go-to" photo package for all listings because their reference level has changed. That's also true of the use of aerial photography for listings, and we expect its popularity will continue to grow. It makes sellers happy, and not all buyers are ready for a crowded open house, marking these marketing tools even more valuable for agents. Regional differences The new HomeJab study also found that real estate agents in the West, Northeast, and Midwest are spending more for real estate listing photography services coming out of the pandemic than before the start of the pandemic. Specifically, the numbers show: West: Up nearly 9 percent (8.7%) Northeast: +7.5% Midwest: +5.6% Real estate agents in the Southwest and Southeast either spent more or modestly less for real estate listing photography services since the pandemic began, specifically: Southwest: -0.6% Southeast: +2.8% In terms of average marketing spend for listing photography, we also found that the average real estate listing photography services order was up 5.9% from post-pandemic orders from $216.50 and now averages $229 per order. Regional pricing for average orders also varied. Real estate agents in the West spend the most for real estate listing photography services, averaging $279 per order. Midwest real estate agents spend the least, averaging $200 per order, or nearly 40% less than real estate agents in the West. Northeast real estate agents spend the second least amount, averaging $225 an order. Southeast and Southwest real estate agents' average spend for real estate listing photography services average $229 and $235, respectively. Bottom line Real estate agents' professional real estate listing photography orders proved to be a vital and durable marketing investment in many of the hottest markets during the COVID-19 outbreak. HomeJab research shows that during a time when homes sales struck a frantic pace – and the average number of multiple offers hit a new high – real estate agents still understood the marketing power and client value of visual images for their real estate listings. Post-COVID, we don't expect that to change, and because of COVID, real estate agents may appreciate the value of a professional real estate shoot better than ever. If you are a real estate agent or a professional real estate photographer, you can learn more about HomeJab at homejab.com. Joe Jesuele is the founder and CEO of HomeJab, America's most popular and reliable on-demand professional real estate photography and video marketplace for real estate pros, delivering over 4,000,000 images to help agents sell and rent more than $35 billion in listings.
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Guess What's the Most Popular Day for Taking Real Estate Listing Photos?
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New HomeJab Real Estate Photo Study: NFTs, Unprepared Sellers, Drones and Automation
More than 300 professional real estate photographers were asked, "How often are homeowners prepared for a shoot?" Surprisingly, more than half of the photographers polled said that most of the time -- half to more than half -- homeowners are unprepared. The likely disconnect is that agents may be assuming their sellers know what they need to do to have their homes ready for a listing shoot. The data says otherwise. That's just one of the fascinating facts emerging from our latest HomeJab Real Estate Photography Study, available for free to download. Another highlight from the study came when we turned the table on agents and asked real estate photographers, "How professional is the typical real estate agent who hires you?" Overall, photographers gave agents an average rating of 7.6 on a scale of 1-10, 10 being highly professional. Those are solid marks endorsing that most agents who hire real estate photographers are also "professional." This HomeJab Professional Real Estate Photographer Survey collected responses from 310 professional real estate photographers nationwide. These are primarily seasoned professionals. Fifty percent of the photographers surveyed shoot more than 100 property listings annually. Nearly one-in-three photographers surveyed shoot more than 200 property listings annually, with 40% of the participants being professional photographers for at least six years. Future Tech: NFTs We also asked professional real estate photographers to select two business-related technologies that they are "most excited about." Drones topped the list, with most photographers – 68% – selecting a tech tool that can deliver 4K high-resolution aerial video and images. 360° cameras took the second spot with 54%, and automated editing technology was third, with 35% of photographers saying they are most excited about this new tech. Two more surprises emerged in future tech as well. First, we have heard a ton of praise for the new iPhone camera technology, but only 18% of photographers surveyed say they are excited about new mobile phone cameras. Second, the biggest surprise, at least for me, was with NFTs: nearly one-in-five photographers picked NFTs (blockchain) as the No. 5 top future tech about which they are most excited for. Just five years ago, NFTs didn't even exist. Now it's landing for many as a top 5 future tech pick. What are NFTs, and why is there a growing interest among real estate photographers? NFT means non-fungible token. When something is non-fungible, it can't be replaced with something. There is only one, like a one-of-a-kind trading card. This makes NFTs different than cryptocurrencies, like Bitcoin, which are fungible as they can be traded one for another. And NFTs are anything that's digital – drawings, music, a ticket that gives you access to an event (virtual and/or physical), or other digital collectives. Today, the biggest excitement is around using the tech to sell digital art. NFTs may offer real estate photographers a new way to monetize their creative talent. Time will tell, but NFTs are clearly an emerging hot topic for real estate insiders today. Drones dominate But right now, drones are dominating the future tech discussion about the most exciting new tech among real estate photographers. It makes sense because of the "wow" factor that aerial footage can add to just about any real estate listing. Aerial footage also gives home shoppers something hard to get without visiting the property in person: location perspective. Where does the property sit in relation to other properties and local amenities? How far away are local parks, schools, or retail? What is the property's proximity to local waterways: lakes, rivers, or the ocean? And there is a potential downside to drones. In fact, because of the explosion in the popularity of using aerial photography to market homes over the last few years, we asked professional real estate photographers if they have been harassed by someone when flying a drone to shoot aerial footage of a listing. Our HomeJab survey found that one-in-three photographers experienced harassment when flying a drone. One more interesting fact: 85% of all professional photographers use a drone. Just 15% of photographers surveyed said they had never flown a drone. Again, you can download a free copy of this new report, as well as our first HomeJab Survey we released in the fall, on our website here. Joe Jesuele is the founder and CEO of HomeJab, America's most popular and reliable on-demand professional real estate photography and video marketplace for real estate pros, delivering over 4,000,000 images to help agents sell and rent more than $35 billion in listings.
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RPR Releases Its Social Media and Digital Marketing Survey
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New HomeJab Survey Says Agents Prefer Video Over 3D Interactive Tours
While immersive 3D interactive tours are soaring in popularity, more real estate agents today still prefer video tours, according to a new survey we recently completed at HomeJab. More than one in three real estate agents – 36 percent – said they preferred video tours versus 21 percent for 3D interactive tours. Nearly one-third of agents said they use both video and 3D tours, depending on the seller. Real estate agents know that use of high-quality images and video drives online traffic and engagement. Great photos and videos also raise active real estate agents' local visibility while enhancing their reputation. As a result, professional photographers play an essential role in today's real estate market as they fuel better promotion of property listings. According to the National Association of Realtors, with 97 percent of home buyers using the internet when searching for homes, professional photos, video, and other advanced imaging tools are more important than ever. Using professional imaging can mean a faster home sale and enhance a real estate agent's reputation in the marketplace. At HomeJab.com, we provide on-demand professional real estate photography and other visual production services nationwide for real estate agents and brokers. We are watching new imaging technologies, including virtual staging, virtual twilight photos, and aerial photography, rapidly adopted and used to sell homes faster. Hot new trends One of the hottest trends is virtual staging, which agents prefer slightly more than traditional staging, 30 percent versus 29 percent, respectively. Aerial photography also is one of the fastest-growing trends, being used by agents to elevate their online listings and sell homes faster. More than two out of three (67 percent) real estate agents surveyed said they used aerial photography with their listings. However, the majority (55%) said their use depends on the property. And 12 percent said they use aerial photography with every property listing. While virtual staging showcases a home's interior features, twilight photos grab the viewer's attention. Think about it: how sweet is life during a sunset? It's one of those moments in which everything looks its best, including your home. We know from other research we've done that property listings with twilight photos get three times more engagement from buyers. Most agents – over 76 percent – told us they have either used twilight photos to promote their property listings or are interested in using them. Currently, 40 percent of agents said they use twilight photos, with 35 percent saying they love them. And 5 percent of agents said they use them but don't love them. The more (photos), the merrier We also polled real estate agents on the average number of photos they provide to consumers via their local Multiple Listing Service. We found that for a typical listing, 79 percent of agents surveyed said they upload at least 30 images to the MLS. A breakdown of responses shows that 51 percent of real estate agents upload 30 photos to the MLS for an average-sized home. Nearly 20 percent of real estate agents upload 40 photos. Almost one out of 10 agents upload 50 or more images. Some MLSs limit the number of photos per listing, or this number would likely be much higher. Every day, we work with thousands of professional real estate photographers coast-to-coast who provide real estate agents with a full range of imaging services, edited, and delivered within 24 hours. Accessible through our one-stop-shop for real estate listings at HomeJab.com, every listing comes with a property landing page and full ownership rights. Having easy access to professional real estate photography allows agents to do their jobs better and more efficiently. Professional photography helps agents win more listings and sell homes faster. You can learn more about how we can provide fast and affordable shoots for any sized brokerage, individual agent, or team at HomeJab.com. Joe Jesuele, founder and CEO of HomeJab, America's most popular and reliable on-demand professional real estate photography and video service for real estate pros, is a leading expert on real estate photography and emerging visual technologies for real estate.
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BoxBrownie Releases Its 2021 Listing Visual Marketing Analysis
Here's a terrific report from BoxBrownie about the best ways to visually promote your listings for all ages. You can read an excerpt from the Preface below and then download the full report here. I have heard a lot of criticism of the National Association of Realtors over the past five years in the USA. Of the many countries I have travelled to, the NAR would have to be the organisation providing the greatest benefit to its members that I have ever seen. One of the most under-rated pieces of information the NAR dutifully release annually is the Home Buyers and Sellers Generational Trends report. I cannot speak highly enough of the value of the data released in this report and I personally wished my home country had equivalent data available to agents in order to assist us in sculpting business direction. Staggeringly, I would estimate the members who would know about this report and understand its value to be in the minority. Since 2013, annually this report has shone a light on the website features a purchaser would want to see in their efforts to purchase a property (page 59). Even at the quickest glance, the report tells us a few things: 89% of all purchasers regardless of age wish to see Photos of a listing 67% of all purchasers regardless of age wish to see Floor Plans of a listing 58% of all purchasers regardless of age wish to see a Virtual Tour of a listing These three figures are slightly higher than they have been over the past years, which I could argue might be the influence of being in a year of lockdowns and more difficult access to properties for inspection. However, none of them are out of order with the previous five years and more worth of data this annual survey has collected. If you look at the entire list there are some categories that I have always found humorous, for example, "Real Estate Agent Contact Information." I would assume for this to be on the list, at number 4, there is conceivably some agents not handing out their information to purchasers? Where I come from that person is unlikely to be an agent for very long. A Marketing Plan Over a period of time, I took the NAR report and paraphrased page 59 to formulate a plan for agents to follow in order to maintain consistency or marketing/brand and to sell a property for more, faster. In order of priority, relating to what the purchaser wishes to see, it is our belief at BoxBrownie.com that "best practice" agents have a marketing plan that looks like this: Good imagery Copy with all essential detail A floor plan 360°/virtual tour Video footage The research conducted investigates only three of the above aspects of visual marketing for a listing; Good Imagery, Floor Plans, and 360°/Virtual Tours. This research report is not to point people to BoxBrownie.com’s services. However, through the services we offer, I believe we are best positioned to shine a light on these practices. And whilst it is true that we have a solution for some of these issues, other companies do as well. Our message to the agent, broker, franchise, association, and MLSs is that marketing matters· and our challenge to you is to improve your property marketing to better serve the purchasers and sellers within the industry you operate. So BoxBrownie.com, as a company, and I, as a bullish, inquisitive, now non-practising listing agent (genuinely interested in the USA property industry and equally in love with the fabric and people who make the industry be who it is) are excited to offer this first research report to the American property industry. It is a way of saying thank-you for the way you have accepted this Australian start-up (now scale-up) and the love and support you have shown us over the past four years. Download the full BoxBrownie.com 2021 Listing Visual Marketing Analysis report here.
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What Can We Expect from 2021 Sellers Moving Forward?
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How Are Sellers in the Current Market REALLY Doing?
We've all heard about the on-fire housing market and how it's positioned sellers to ask for much while conceding little. But just how much are sellers in the current market really reaping hefty benefits? How are they feeling about the selling process? What desired outcomes are guiding their selling decisions? Homes.com surveyed 1,600 respondents from across the country to find out. Survey Findings Snapshot The current market is paying hefty dividends for sellers, prompting many homeowners to put their homes up for sale sooner than planned to take advantage of market conditions. Our survey found that 82% of homeowners who sold in the last six months accepted offers at listing price (33%) or above (49%), nearly half of them sold in less than a month, and a quarter of them had five or fewer showings before finding a buyer — reflecting both the low supply of available homes and the rush to buy when new listings hit the market. Shortage? What Inventory Shortage? One of the major hesitancies homeowners have in today's market is a concern about low inventory — and for good reason! Who wants to sell their home without the guarantee of finding another home to buy? But, as our survey found out, this wasn't as big a problem as might be expected. Significantly, of the sellers we surveyed who intended to sell and immediately buy a new home to move into, 86% were able to do just that, despite limited inventory. The rest cited a move into rentership while continuing to house shop. Of the sellers who didn't have any plans to buy after selling, 24% said they moved into their secondary home, 19% had already purchased a new home build and rented while waiting for construction to complete, 11% began renting simply because they wanted to, and 9% decided to move in with family or friends. Smooth Sailing Sellers haven't just enjoyed the success of buying new property; they've also reaped the benefits of smooth selling processes. Looking at finances, our survey found that 49% sold above listing price, while 33% of sellers sold at their original listing price. In fact, 27% wound up accepting offers $10,000, even $20,000+ higher than their requested sale price. Cha-ching! Glancing at the process between listing and offer acceptance, 27% of sellers said they had five or fewer in-person showings before selling, while 26% had between six and ten. Amazingly, nearly 10% had no in-person showings at all. But, this is perhaps not as surprising as it might be in previous years; thanks to the growing prevalence of virtual tours, there's been an upward trend in buyers' openness to purchase a home sight unseen. We also found a strong correlation between the number of showings sellers' homes had, and the number of offers they received. A third of sellers said they sold their homes within the first five offers received, and nearly two-thirds wound up selling within the first 10. This roughly correlates to the number of showings, indicating that sellers received bids after virtually every walkthrough. It also offers a glance into why homes are flying so quickly off the market so soon after being listed! If you've been helping clients on the hunt for a new home, you've likely encountered this scenario: your buyers find a home they love, you schedule a tour for as soon as you can, but by the time you get there, the home has already been sold. You're in good company; this blink-and-you-miss-it issue has been plaguing buyers across the country for months, and doesn't show signs of slowing down! When we asked sellers how long their homes were listed before they sold, 22% said the process took less than two weeks, 25% were on the market between two and four weeks, and 27% for between one and two months. In other words, only less than a third of sellers' listings were on the market for longer than two months. Calling the Shots Another story dominating headlines in the real estate sphere lately has been just how much power sellers have over the purchase process. A mix of sharp demand and low inventory have left sellers holding all the cards, and our survey found they're using them to their full advantage! Many of the sellers surveyed indicated they refused consideration of contingencies and other strings-attached offers; 28% of them required all-cash payments, no contingencies and/or less than 30 days to close, while 14% opted for selling their homes completely "as is," leaving buyers without the flexibility available in less competitive markets. Interestingly, we found that they were more amenable to making repairs requested after showings or home inspections, with 56% agreeing to perform repairs, upgrades or replacement requested by buyers as a condition of sale. Of those who made those adjustments, 34% spent $10,000 or more, but one in four were able to recoup those costs by selling for $10,000 or more over listing price. Why Did They Sell in the First Place? As if the initial adjustments to pandemic life weren't stressful enough, our survey found that COVID-19 challenges were major drivers for homeowners deciding to sell; 43% cited financial impacts from the pandemic as their primary reason for selling. Other reasons included job relocation (14%), upsizing or downsizing needs (14%), a desire to move to another neighborhood (8%), retirement (4%) or a transition to remote working providing the option to relocate (4%). For many sellers, the market itself was influential in their process, with one in three entering the market only because they saw the opportunity to sell quickly and profitably. Twenty-three percent said their local market opportunities sped up their planned timeline to sell, while a surprising 11% actually hadn't planned to sell at all, but changed their minds in hopes of cashing in on the booming demand. And yes, this did happen; 5% actually received unsolicited offers on their homes, and they wound up selling them! What Can We Expect Moving Forward? It's not likely we'll see immediate relief from this blistering market any time soon; however, Homes.com will continue this survey series with a focus on homeowners who are planning to sell in the coming months. What types of homes will they be listing? At what price will their homes be listed? Will they be more willing to negotiate terms? Stay tuned to find out! To view the original article, visit the Homes.com blog.
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How Do Most Clients Find You? Why It's Vital to Stay Top-of-Mind
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Nearly 8 in 10 Home Buyers are Taking More 3D Home Tours During the Pandemic, Citing Safety Concerns
For residential real estate, touring homes virtually has become increasingly important since the coronavirus outbreak. Over the last seven months, home sellers, buyers and real estate professionals have had to work around restrictions preventing in-person property showings and grapple with safety concerns over potential exposure to COVID-19. Last January, Matterport conducted a survey to learn about buyer and seller preferences for home listings. We found that static photos are no longer enough and that both sellers and buyers overwhelmingly preferred a more immersive experience with 3D tours. In September, we partnered with Redfin, the technology-powered real estate brokerage, to poll 1,000 U.S. home buyers and 1,000 U.S. home sellers to see how these preferences have shifted since the onset of the pandemic.
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75% of Real Estate Agents Optimistic About the Market Despite Pandemic
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Why the Census Counts: RPR and REALTORS Rely on Accurate Data
With everything going on in our country right now, it's easy to understand why filling out the Census form may slip your mind. However, it's a crucial process that can potentially affect everyone in the U.S. RPR uses Census data every day, and every REALTOR does, too. Access to accurate, up-to-date data about population and geographies is key to the real estate industry and real estate professionals.
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NAR 2020 Member Profile: Realtors Used More Technology, Cited Inventory Constraints
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How Is Your Business Doing During COVID-19? Share Your Thoughts to Win $100
What's happening in the real estate market? If someone wants to know, it's best to ask a real estate agent. That's exactly what Homes.com is doing a new, nationwide survey of real estate agents. And they want YOUR opinion—and in exchange, you could win a $100 Amazon gift card! It's been four months since the start of the COVID-19 shutdowns. How has the pandemic affected your real estate business? Take the survey to to share your experiences and opinions on: New listings and listing cancellations Changing buyer wants, needs, and budgets The impact of low mortgage rates on buyers Using real estate tech during the pandemic Your feelings on the current and future housing markets And more! Take the Business Sentiment Survey for Real Estate Professionals from Homes.com today for the chance to win a $100 Amazon gift card!
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Ad Science: Ads with Faces Eleven Times More Likely to Get Noticed
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What Homebuyers and Sellers Think About COVID-19
We read a lot about what the so-called 'experts' think will happen to the real estate market as a result of COVID-19, but what do homebuyers and sellers think? Transactly conducted a market survey of 400 homebuyers and 400 home sellers who planned on buying or selling a home in 2020, prior to COVID-19, to hear their opinions. Here's what we learned.
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Analysis: Agents Should Double Down on Facebook and Instagram Ads as Advertising Costs Drop
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With 3D Tours, Properties Sell Up to 31% Faster and at a Higher Price
For the past five years, agents and brokers worldwide have used the Matterport 3D virtual walkthrough to differentiate their real estate services and bring the concept of a 24/7 virtual open house into the mainstream. Now, preliminary results from two separate studies indicate that listings with a Matterport 3D virtual walkthrough sell for a higher price and can spend less time on market than homes listed using a traditional marketing package.
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Is Your Headshot Killing Your Business?
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Is the Square Footage of Your Listing Fake News or Are You Selling Properties Using Accurate Square Footage?
Agents say they will do anything possible to represent the best interests of their sellers. However, some are missing one really important aspect of selling a house: the square footage. Many agents assume the square footage information from an old listing in the MLS or found in public tax records is accurate. But is it really? No, it is not. It is what we call unverified square footage. To successfully represent the best interest of their sellers, agents should always be using verified square footage of a property. Verified square footage comes in three different forms: appraisers or agents measure the home themselves (if they are knowledgeable of the local rules on what should be counted as square footage), or they use technology. Technology can be a powerful tool because there are several companies in the market that don't just measure the seller's home, they also provide ways of promoting the home. In just a couple of paragraphs, we have just scratched the surface as to what an agent needs to know to understand how verified square footage can improve their level of professionalism. Download the case study written by WAV Group to get a full understanding of improving your professionalism using square footage.
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Top 10 Issues Impacting the Real Estate Industry: Annual Forecast Reveals
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Gen Z is Buying Their First Homes! Here's What You Need to Know
Millennials and their buying habits have been under the scrutiny of the real estate industry for years. We've watched them go from a minority to the largest group of buyers in the market, but now Generation Z is taking its first steps into the housing market, and it's time we learned more about this new group of first time buyers. In an effort to do just that, Homes.com polled more than 1000 adults from Generation Z aged 18 to 24 years old. Questions focused on Generation Z's expectations about the home buying experience and their home buying plans.
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Friday Freebie: Take a 5-Minute Survey on Listing Strategy, Get Rewards
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Study Reveals How Long It Really Takes for Each Step of the Home Buying Process
On average, it takes just over half a year for a home buyer to move into their new home. The research that revealed this also broke down the time spent on individual steps -- and pain points experienced -- along the way to closing a deal. The results are in, and a poll consisting of 2000 homebuyers has now determined that the average amount of time spent, from beginning a search to collecting the keys for a new home, is six months and 24 days. In completing that process, the exchange of contracts was shown to be the longest step, taking an average of five months and ten days, but ranging all the way up to 25 months in some unlucky instances. The study, conducted by OnePoll, also found that, on average, homebuyers spend 20 hours looking at 16 homes online before even scheduling a visit. In what's becoming an increasingly online experience, this finding emphasizes a trend where those marketing home listings are taking advantage of new opportunities to reach potential clients. After narrowing down their choices online, the average homebuyer will view a home three times before putting in an offer. The time between a final visit and eventual offer comes out to around four-and-a-half days. A recent article featuring the study notes that, in conducting the research, experts took into account various aspects of the home buying experience. This includes insight into common homebuyer expectations and frustrations. The amount of time involved in the process led to 14 percent of respondents coming to a compromise on some aspect of their ideal home when ultimately choosing a property. "While the idea of moving somewhere new is thrilling, the reality can be very different," says James Morris-Manuel, VP of Matterport EMEA. House hunting can be tough and time-consuming, especially for those who are juggling working full time, families, and those who may not necessarily be living in the area in which they want to buy. According to the poll, three in 10 respondents reported finding a property with everything they were looking for to be the most difficult aspect, while a fifth of home buyers found choosing a property to be the most time-consuming. "Even viewing a home can be irritating – having to fit in with the owner's timing and requirements, not being close enough to view a property as often as you'd wish, and then wanting to revisit when a decision has been made," says Morris-Manuel. One third of respondents said that, after finally buying a home, they found the process to have taken longer than they expected. To make matters worse, one quarter experienced an unsuccessful offer on a home, while 12 percent faced three or more such instances, prolonging their search. This study offers not only an in-depth look into the timeline of the home buyer's process, but also insight into areas that are found to be the most burdensome parts of that process. Real estate agents providing the most complete and informative experience for their clients are in the best position to be the resource today's homebuyer values. To view the original article, visit the Matterport blog.
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Key Findings from Our Third Annual Referral Report
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A Google Study on Team Efficiency: 5 Takeaways for Your Real Estate Business
Project Aristotle A team at Google wanted to explore what types of people and qualities make up the "perfect" team. They studied 180 teams (115 project teams in engineering, and 65 sales pods), and ultimately defined five aspects of effective teams. We will explore these five dynamics, what they mean for a real estate team, and how you can implement them to improve your team efficiency.
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Why Background Checks on Real Estate Prospects Don't Work
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How Referrals Can Help Take Your Business to the Next Level
"A lead is simply an inquiry on a property. A referral is a lead that's been qualified: The person giving the referral has taken time to ask specific questions that qualify that lead." — An agent quoted in the 2018 Agent-to-Agent Economy study by ReferralExchange. For newer agents entering the industry, leads are an important part of how they grow their business. However, for more established agents, referrals represent a real opportunity not just in business coming in, but in creating a network where they can refer clients out. Many clients may need an agent outside their main agent's geographic area or service parameters. When that occurs, some clients may feel they have to go it alone. However, having a referral system that supports their sphere doesn't just provide the agent with additional income, it delivers peace of mind for agents and their clients. What does a strong referral business look like and how can this be a potential "side hustle" for agents, providing a secondary income stream?
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Realtor Safety: What NAR's 2017 Report Reveals
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Profile of Today's Real Estate Pro: Insights from the 2017 NAR Member Profile
Each year, the National Association of REALTORS® randomly samples their members to answer questions about who today's real estate pros are. It examines everything from their demographics and economic preferences to their business activity and practices. The newest report shows that membership within the National Association of REALTORS® has increased from 1.16 million in March 2016 to 1.22 million in March 2017, with 82 percent of those sampled very sure they'll maintain their profession for at least two more years. Here are a few deeper insights from the report:
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Real Estate Statistics to Help You Determine Where You Stand
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The Battle of Consumer Profiles
Long the bible of consumer data in residential real estate, NAR's venerable Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers now has competition. With the 2016 Profile, which was released on Halloween and is based on a massive survey of both buyers who have participated in recent residential transactions, NAR celebrated 35 years of annual publication. When the Profile was launched in 1981, Ronald Reagan was inaugurated for his first term, "Raiders of the Lost Ark" opened in theaters and the median value of a home was $55,300. in recent years, the Profile has been the source of information that defines residential real estate today, such as these often-cited findings: The percentage of home buyers who used the internet to search for a home increased to 95 percent in 2016 after holding steady at 92 percent for three years in a row. Sixty-four percent of sellers found their agent through a referral from a friend, neighbor, or relative or used an agent they had worked with before to buy or sell a home. FSBOs typically sell for less than the selling price of other homes; FSBO homes sold at a median of $185,000 last year (down from $210,000 the year prior), and significantly lower than the median of agent-assisted homes at $245,000. While the venerable NAR Profile set the standard for years as the "go to" source of consumer data, now it has a competitor with some different ideas about what measure and how to present its results. Just a a few weeks before NAR releases its 35th edition, Zillow introduced the first Zillow Group Report on Consumer Housing Trends.
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What's Changed in 35 Years of Real Estate Sales?
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"Move-In Ready" Increasingly Means Smart Home Technology for US Consumers
Sellers looking to upgrade their home before putting it on the market may be wise to install smart home technology. According to a new survey from Coldwell Banker, 44 percent of US consumers believe a house that's "move-in ready" has smart home technology. In fact, 54 percent of survey respondents would choose the home with smart technology when faced with two houses that are exactly the same, and 26 percent believe the technology is a major selling point. So What Is Smart Home Technology? Speaking of "defining," what exactly is smart home technology? Coldwell Banker teamed up with CNET in May to clarify the term. The two companies settled on a mutual definition to "provide a clear and unified designation to keep up with rapidly evolving technology." To start, a home must have a reliable internet connection and one of two base "smart" systems: 1) security features that control access via smart locks or monitors the home through, say, networked security cameras; or, 2) smart temperature controls. Additionally, a property must have two other systems from the following list to qualify as a smart home: Appliances (smart refrigerators and smart washer / dryers) Entertainment (smart TVs and TV streaming services) Heating / Cooling (smart HVAC system, smart fans or vents) Lighting (smart light bulbs and lighting systems) Outdoors (smart plant sensors and watering systems) Safety (smart fire / carbon monoxide detectors and nightlights)
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Are Real Estate Agents Dishonest?
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Two-thirds of Buyers Are 'Addicted' to Online Property Listings
Online property listings are the new crack. At least, that's what a new poll commissioned by Discover Home Loans suggests. According to the poll, 67 percent of home buyers report feeling addicted to looking at online listings, and 78 percent admit to looking at listings while at work. The revelation of this fairly benign addiction was just one part of the poll that looked more broadly at consumers' use of online technology during the home buying process. Overall, 76 percent of buyers said technology made them smarter home buyers and 69 percent said it made them more confident. Here are a few more interesting results from the poll: 72% of buyers explore a neighborhood using online maps or map apps 55% research a neighborhood using local websites Social media wasn't a big player in the buying process, with only 25% using it to "collect ideas" and just 29% soliciting opinions from friends and family on social networks The Internet played a large role in submitting paperwork, however. 71% of buyers submitted docs to their lenders online, while 68% used the Web to submit documents to their agents Online calculators are an important tool: 70% used them to estimate their monthly mortgage payments, 61% to discover how much home they could afford, and 52% to see if they were financially ready to buy a home A whopping 92% of buyers said technology saved them time, with 93% stating that technology allowed them to do things remotely that they would otherwise have to do in person
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Finding True Job Satisfaction in Real Estate
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Do Luxury Clients Prefer iPhones?
I'm captivated by this map of iPhone users in New York City. It shows where Android and iOS users are concentrated geographically. And, surprise (or not?), the lines appear to be drawn along economic lines. iPhones users (in red) coat affluent Manhattan, while Android dominates the poorer outer boroughs. The trend stays true in other locales, as well--San Francisco, Los Angeles, and London all map out according to the same income pattern. Does this mean that luxury clients prefer premium-priced iPhones over lower cost Androids? The data seem to suggest that. If you serve the luxury market, consider switching to an iPhone to better reflect the values of your client base. And be sure that your website looks good and functions properly on the platform. Similarly, any apps you offer to clients (like branded search apps, eSign, etc.) need to work flawlessly on iOS.
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Recommendations for Going Digital
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The Happiest Agent on the Block
This article comes to us from the Market Leader blog: Market Leader recently surveyed over 3,000 real estate professionals to determine how happy they are. The goal was to find out how various aspects of their careers and lives – like their marital status and commission splits – can impact their happiness. The "Happiest Agent on the Block" survey assessed agent happiness using the following four important metrics: happiness with their real estate careers, incomes, the tasks they complete on a day-to-day basis (e.g., following up with leads and attending client appointments), and life in general. The results of the "Happiest Agent on the Block" survey contained many surprises tidbits which have significantly increased Market Leader's understanding of who real estate agents are as people, not just professionals. An infographic featuring some of the most compelling survey findings can be found below. Our general survey findings about agent happiness are listed on the next page.
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Take A Stand: Increase Your Sales; Improve Your Health
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A Portrait of the Agent – Realtor® Habit Survey
This post comes to us from the Market Leader blog: Market Leader surveyed 1,967 Realtors® in August 2013 to learn about their habits. We asked questions about offbeat topics not covered in NAR's Annual Member Profile or similar studies. Questions touched on topics as diverse as their procrastination habits, cell phone usage while driving, and favorite cuisine. Read on to discover what Market Leader's survey uncovered about Realtors® – from habits common across the profession to the differences in habits between the most and least successful Realtors®!
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How Real Estate Agents are Using Mobile Technology
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Monthly Real Estate Showings Data: March Shows Steady Increase for 2012
Guest contributor Showing Suite shares the following article on their blog. We've compiled our real estate showings statistics for the month of March, and compared the data against the last six years. So far, in 2012, our data is proving a continuous rise in overall real estate showings with the highest amount of home showings since 2007; and our data for the month of March is no different. According to Showing Suite's CBSA reports, we've found that in 2012, home showings in March continue to rise, at a 6% increase compared to March of 2011.
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Tuesday Tech Tip with Maya Paveza of HipRoof.com
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Mastering Your Blog Timing
How many times a day or week should you blog to keep people interested? Do you know what time of day is best for blogging? Does it matter? The answer is simple: there is a science to blogging. With millions of bloggers, how do you make your message rise above the digital noise and gain traction within your industry? When are people listening? Don't worry, there are answers to this based on scientific research. Modern day blogging has evolved into a science. If you are interested in keeping a client and subscriber base informed and engaged with you and your message, it is well worth your time to invest in learning some of the research behind the science of blog timing. HubSpot social media scientist Dan Zarrella discussed his research on timing. He has conducted research on the Internet for the last 2-3 years. Of all the subjects he researches, the science of timing is the number one piece of data consumers want to know. He researches and identifies best practices. This webinar presents all the data to date that Zarrella has studied. It covers three marketing mediums businesses use for inbound marketing: social media, email and blogging. This article focuses on blogging specifically.
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Your Reputation: To Be Shared Online?
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The Science of Timing: Blogging
How many times a day or week should you blog to keep people interested? Do you know what time of day is best for blogging? Does it matter? The answer is simple: there is a science to blogging. With millions of bloggers, how do you make your message rise above the digital noise and gain traction within your industry? When are people listening? Don't worry, there are answers to this based on scientific research. Modern day blogging has evolved into a science. If you are interested in keeping a client and subscriber base informed and engaged with you and your message, it is well worth your time to invest in learning some of the research behind the science of blog timing. HubSpot social media scientist Dan Zarrella discussed his research on timing. He has conducted research on the Internet for the last 2-3 years. Of all the subjects he researches, the science of timing is the number one piece of data consumers want to know. He researches and identifies best practices. This webinar presents all the data to date that Zarrella has studied. It covers three marketing mediums businesses use for inbound marketing: social media, email and blogging. This article focuses on blogging specifically.
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The Science of Timing: Emailing
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The Science of Timing: Social Media
How many times a day or week should you tweet? Do you know what time of day is best for tweeting? What about posting on Facebook? Does it matter? The answer is simple: social media is not a haphazard activity anymore. It has evolved into a science. If you are interested in promoting yourself and your business online, it is well worth your time to invest in learning some of the research behind what social media gurus are calling the "science of timing." HubSpot social media scientist Dan Zarrella discussed his research on timing. He has conducted research on the Internet for the last 2-3 years. Of all the subjects he researches, the science of timing is the number one piece of data consumers want to know. He researches and identifies best practices. This webinar presents all the data to date that Zarrella has studied. It covers three marketing mediums businesses use for inbound marketing: social media, email, and blogging. This article focuses on social media specifically.
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Back to the Basics: Advocacy Marketing for Real Estate Professionals
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Meeting Gen Y's Demand for Online Transparency and Information
I interviewed a top-producing agent in San Francisco a few days ago. We were talking about the role of technology in the real estate process. It was a fascinating discussion. She is on the top of her game. Many listings, many successful transactions with buyers this year and yet she struggles with how to stay relevant with her younger clients. She told me:   “I am absolutely frightened of new technologies, and yet I KNOW I need to communicate and provide information differently than I used to. I believe it is much more difficult to create a deep personal relationship with younger consumers because they don’t want to sit down and talk about what their real needs are. They want me to provide information on my website so they can do their own research and then tell me what they’ve found. They require that the agent provide as much information as they can to empower the consumer to get comfortable with the information themselves.”
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Don’t Ignore Client Needs, Instead Become the Educator
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Idaho Valley Foreclosures Down 25% in October!
The peaks and valleys of local NOD filings continue. After a 21% increase in September with775 filings in Ada and Canyon Counties, defaults are back down 25% for the month of Octoberwith 582 filings. The 582 filings is the second lowest monthly total in 2010 only behind June when 557 defaults were recorded.Since January of 2010 Ada County has averaged 418 default starts a month and Canyon County has averaged a total of 280 default starts. Together Ada and Canyon Counties have averaged 697 foreclosure filings a month to date in 2010.
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How Much is a Facebook Fan Worth?
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Confused by Social Media Lingo?
By 2010 Generation Y has come to outnumber Baby Boomers and 96% of them have not only joined a social network, but also spend considerable time using it. We also wanted to share some of our thoughts and experiences in using social media for our business. As you read through this guide, we hope that you will find the information useful in forming your business's social media plan. Why do I take the time to use social media like Twitter and Facebook? Because after spending considerable time learning and using social media, I can safely say that we should expect our lives to radically and exponentially be changed by social media and social networks over the next few years. Many traditional forms of media that we have been using for decades are being eclipsed with a growth in membership numbers and adoption rates that we have never experienced before. Consumers no longer want or trust advertising to the same levels they did a decade ago.
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Have 2 Minutes? Take a Short Smartphone Survey!
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Tell Us! How Do You Use Social Media to Further Your Business?
Hello RETechnology agents! I am working on a project with Chris Brogan for Human Business Works, it is a project specifically for the real estate industry and we are seeking real estate professionals top share their personal success stories of how they are using a variety of social media platforms to build their real estate business. Especially awesome are multiple and continued success stories! The idea is to give great examples of best practices and processes that are working, in the words of the agent who is doing it and credited to that person. We want to share your social media success stories!!! Some of the suggested platforms: LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Blogs, Posterous, SEO, anything you want to add. The advantage to the real estate professional, if selected to be used in the project, is that your story will also help build your credibility as an area expert and add to your resume. And don't forget the exposure you will get! Show those clients who the best agent is!! If you are interested please send your success story to Maya ([email protected]), and try to put it in the format requested, or as closely as you can. If selected we may need additional some additional information form you. And please share it with anyone you know! Any small success is great to share, or a large one!
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Early Bird Gets the Lead!
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Target Practice: Aim for Gen Y
The disconnect between the couple looking to buy a car and the car sales person is painfully obvious.  While humorous, it demonstrates the point that understanding your audience is paramount to closing a deal.  For real estate agents today, understanding Generation Y (a.k.a. Gen Y) is the key. Why? Gen Y is the next big wave of homebuyers. As a group Generation Y, is larger than the Baby Boomers – there are 80 million of them compared to about 60 million Baby Boomers. Plus, they have more earning power than the generation before it, about $200 billion compared to $125 billion of Generation X. According to Terrye Underwood, senior principal at real estate research firm RCLCO in Los Angeles, “Generation Y stands to create the biggest wave of first-time home buyers ever in 2012. With this generation, we might naturally grow ourselves out of the current housing slump.” According to Terrye, Generation Y is “a label attributed to people born during the 1980s and early 1990s. Members of Generation Y are often referred to as “echo boomers” because they are the children of parents born during the baby boom(“baby boomers”).  Children born during this time period have had constant access to technology (computers, cell phones) in their youth."
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Don't Be Late for That Very Important Date!
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Sex, Lies and Texting
The average adult racks up 10 text messages in a day. Teens average 50 per day, or 1,500 per month, so says a new study just published. Although Americans once lagged in text messaging, U.S. teens have zoomed right past many other countries says Rich Ling, a professor at IT University of Copenhagen. Many are even predicting that texting will soon be more popular than calls. So whether you’re President Obama, sports legend Tiger Woods or a hardworking Realtor® texting could be something you will be dealing with more extensively in the not too distant future. We all know that digital data is notoriously hard to destroy. So the explosion of texting is creating a new concern regarding privacy. Even the Supreme Court is already struggling with this issue in a case involving a police SWAT member. Is this concern real or only to those who have something to hide. What are your options?
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Step 5: Your Social Network is Still Your #1 Profit Center
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The Real Estate Confidence Index and One Big Prize
Over the past year, many of have received emails from Point2 seeking feedback about the real estate market in your area. This has allowed them to track current market trends, and long term outlooks – ultimately providing real estate professionals insight into what is happening in the market and where it may be headed. By participating each month, Point2 was able to gather data from some of the best in the field (like you!) and develop an informative document called The Real Estate Confidence Index. This June marks a bit of a milestone…it was one year ago they first created the Real Estate Confidence Index. The past year has seen some pretty cool things, including being featured in some of the industry’s highest profile publications, such as INMAN News, REALTOR Magazine Online, and RIS Media. While there has been market ups and downs, Point2 can only hope for more positive change in the real estate market.  They enjoy reading agent and broker feedback each and every month. They’ll admit – they have it pretty good here in Saskatchewan – and the opportunity to hear about what’s going on in other parts of North America can certainly be enlightening. Not only are they able to take your valuable input, compile it into a digestible format and provide it back to you – but hearing your thoughts and concerns about the real estate industry in general helps them continue to grow and understand their members. Continue reading to learn how to access the research ...
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Local to National, Traditional to Digital: Advertising Trends
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Add a Picture and Twitter Will Follow!
Adding a picture to your Twitter account is an easy, effective way to actually gain a followwing. Dan Zarella of HubSpot hit on an interesting social media tip this morning. When publishing Twitter statistics, one of the most common questions I'm asked is about the effect of setting a profile picture in your Twitter account. I dug into Twitter Grader data and analyzed nearly 9 million Twitter profiles to produce the graph below. It doesn't take much, but if you want to get followers on Twitter, it's a good idea to upload a picture of yourself. To view the original HubSpot blog post, click here. Top 10 Reasons to Go Paperless Steer Clear of a Tax Audit for 2010 Fire Up Your Social Network on Zillow
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Desire For Video Content Drives Online Searches
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Middle Aged Women Dominate Mobile Social Networking
Press Release from Neilson: Women and people between 35 and 54 are most apt to perform social networking activities via mobile device, according to data from The Nielsen Company. Since Women are a core audience for REAL Estate Marketing, it would seem that social mobile networking would be a good strategy for agents and brokers today. Mobile Social Networking Gender GapA clear gender gap exists in social networking activity on mobile devices. In December 2009, Nielsen research indicates that women were responsible for 55% of mobile social networking activity, compared to 45% performed by men. Forty-five percent of all mobile internet users go online to post comments on social networks, with 91% of mobile internet users going online to socialize, according to a recent study from Ruder-Finn. The Ruder-Finn study also indicates a gender gap in mobile social networking. Women are much more likely than men to personally express themselves (49% vs. 35%), and entertain others (70% vs. 58%) via mobile internet.    
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Stop Advertising, Start Edutizing
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Digital SLR Cameras on a Shoestring
Remember when it was common to drop $500 to $700 on a nice digital point-and-shoot? These days, with the same money, you can pick up a digital SLR camera. These aren't professional models or the very best that current technology has to offer, but for the photo enthusiast on a budget—or even the avid family photographer—they can be a big leap forward. With larger sensors and generally faster performance than snapshot models offer, these cameras provide plenty of tools to photographers who prefer a camera with more than one button. And if you save your pennies, you can increase their flexibility and image quality in the future with additional lens and accessory purchases. But which to buy from this year's models, continue reading for my take. 
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